Hooah!

By: Tammy Carnrike

Chamber COO Tammy Carnrike participated in the Joint Civilian Orientation Conference (JCOC), a program sponsored by the Secretary of Defense for civilian public opinion leaders interested in growing their knowledge of the military and national defense issues. JCOC is the oldest existing Department of Defense outreach program having been held more than 81 times since its inception in 1948. Tammy spent five days in the Western U.S. visiting each branch of the U.S. military and learning about the readiness of the armed forces and our nation’s defense policies.

Day four was spent with the army and what a day it was. I was specifically excited for this day because it was my Army friends at TACOM that nominated me for the JCOC experience.

We left San Diego and flew to Seattle to visit Join Base Lewis McChord, a joint Air Force and Army base.

Upon arrival and being greeted by Lt. General Thomas Brown, we put on protective body gear and were taken to watch a live fire demonstration. Here, tanks and infantrymen showed their skills in leadership, teamwork and strategy in battlefield engagement.

Then came the part we had been looking forward to all week — eating MRE’s (meals ready to eat) for lunch. I’ve always heard about the field meals for soldiers and I had an expectation that they would be cold and tasteless. I was wrong. My pack included beef, ravioli, cheese and crackers, oatmeal, a cookie, orange drink, coffee and a pop tart. 

 

There is a bag with a heating element in the bottom and you pour a small amount of water into it for activation. You simply add your main meal and set it aside to heat while you enjoy the rest of your snacks. It was delicious! The average MRE has between 2,000 and 4,000 calories and is full of protein and other essentials. After wearing heavy body gear during all of these physical activities, you understand the need for these nutritious meals.

We spent the afternoon learning about the many capabilities the Army has from heavy equipment to build roads and demolish buildings to laundry facilities that wash 750 lbs. of laundry at one time. It was all very impressive.

 

To break up the afternoon with some interactive experience, we were taken to a shooting range where I learned the power of an M4 rifle.

At that point, we had been in the hot son atop a mountain in heavy body gear all day. This made us realize the hardships that our troops have to endure.

With our full body gear on, it was time to board a Stryker to travel to a team training course. Standing through the roof hatch, observing soldiers operate the the Stryker functions traveling along the road alongside five other Stryker tanks was an amazing experience.

At the team training course, Team Army was able to complete the challenge given to them in less than 30 minutes. We then received an evaluation of our work from a team of lieutenants and sergeants.

Lt. General Brown hosted us for a salmon bake and a presentation on the importance of leadership. The Lt. General speaks regularly on leadership nationally and internationally including the Blanchard Forum.

It was another long, exhausting day but I learned so much about the strength and depth of our Army. These soldiers are dedicated, strong and talented on many levels. A majority of them are between the ages of 19 and 29 with experience and expectations beyond my understanding. Like the other services I visited this week, the soldiers love what they do.

Leadership Detroit at JCOC

By: Tammy Carnrike

Like I said earlier, reminders of Michigan are everywhere. Here is a photo of Jonathan Smith, a Leadership Detroit graduate who is now President and CEO of OneLead, based in New Jersey. He currently resides in New York City.

Camp Pendleton

By: Tammy Carnrike

Chamber COO Tammy Carnrike participated in the Joint Civilian Orientation Conference (JCOC), a program sponsored by the Secretary of Defense for civilian public opinion leaders interested in growing their knowledge of the military and national defense issues. JCOC is the oldest existing Department of Defense outreach program having been held more than 81 times since its inception in 1948. Tammy spent five days in the Western U.S. visiting each branch of the U.S. military and learning about the readiness of the armed forces and our nation’s defense policies.

After concluding our Marine recruit experience in the morning, it was off to Camp Pendleton where Marines are trained.

We started with lunch and were joined by Marines at our tables. It was so impressive to talk with them about their careers, their deployment experiences, their families and their future. These young men love being Marines and, in fact, cannot imagine not being there.

Then it was off for an interactive ammunition range experience. I had the chance to shoot different weapon types used by Marines in the field.

Getting to Know the Marines and Looking for My Advil

By: Tammy Carnrike

Chamber COO Tammy Carnrike participated in the Joint Civilian Orientation Conference (JCOC), a program sponsored by the Secretary of Defense for civilian public opinion leaders interested in growing their knowledge of the military and national defense issues. JCOC is the oldest existing Department of Defense outreach program having been held more than 81 times since its inception in 1948. Tammy spent five days in the Western U.S. visiting each branch of the U.S. military and learning about the readiness of the armed forces and our nation’s defense policies.

Today, we started at 4:30 a.m. and were taken to the Marine Corps recruiting center in San Diego. We were warned ahead of time to come prepared with an open mind. From the time we arrived, we were treated the same as marine recruits when they first arrive for training. (Well, not completely, but enough to get your attention and sharpen your discipline.)

I screamed back commands to my commanding officer, filed in formation, marched a mile, endured drill sergeants, ate a mess hall and best of all, I free roped 20 feet, rappelled 65 feet and completed a bayonet course in full combat gear. The bayonet course was extremely challenging for me, especially when it came to jumping in and out of fox holes since I am a bit vertically challenged.

Now I’m digging in my backpack searching for my Advil before our next destination :).

Seriously, this was an amazing experience and I have a better understanding of why Marines are so tough on their recruits. One officer said it best: “We make Marines and win wars.” They work on their minds and bodies constantly to build strength, confidence and discipline. A drill sergeant helped us by describing how commands relate to scenarios in battle situations.

When I was preparing to rappel, I gained understanding as to why their training methods are designed to build confidence. As I climbed up the 65 foot tower and looked down, I felt my heart rate increase and my head get light. I got through it and even wanted to do it again!

Off now to the second half of our day getting to know the Marines.

More later.

By the way, no photos this time because they wouldn’t allow us. Professional photographers were capturing our experiences.

Submarine Rescue Unit

By: Tammy Carnrike

Chamber COO Tammy Carnrike participated in the Joint Civilian Orientation Conference (JCOC), a program sponsored by the Secretary of Defense for civilian public opinion leaders interested in growing their knowledge of the military and national defense issues. JCOC is the oldest existing Department of Defense outreach program having been held more than 81 times since its inception in 1948. Tammy spent five days in the Western U.S. visiting each branch of the U.S. military and learning about the readiness of the armed forces and our nation’s defense policies.

Our naval base experience ended with a briefing on the submarine rescue unit, which provided an amazing experience and learning opportunity.

The United States Navy has the ability to rescue submarine passengers, anywhere in the world, within 72 hours – that’s right, 72 hours is our goal.

Based on the briefing we received, the Navy has a unit that can rescue individuals in a submarine as deep as 2,000 feet. In order to provide the necessary relief, components are flown via aircraft to the closest air field. Then the components are assembled like a giant Tinkertoy. It is truly impressive.

Being available for rescue within 72 hours means flying with all the component parts and equipment and then assembling on site. once equipment is in place, the team can submerge and assess the situation. There is a dive suit that weighs more than 1500 pounds worn by a member of the team to be effective in the mission. The submarine rescue unit is primarily focused on humanitarian relief.

You will see by the photos below, equipment used to assist in the rescue and the equipment necessary to transfer people out of the sub.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m learning so much about our military services personnel that I never realized before.

Navy’s Innovation, Entrepreneurialism Stands Out

By: Tammy Carnrike

Chamber COO Tammy Carnrike participated in the Joint Civilian Orientation Conference (JCOC), a program sponsored by the Secretary of Defense for civilian public opinion leaders interested in growing their knowledge of the military and national defense issues. JCOC is the oldest existing Department of Defense outreach program having been held more than 81 times since its inception in 1948. Tammy spent five days in the Western U.S. visiting each branch of the U.S. military and learning about the readiness of the armed forces and our nation’s defense policies.

While day one was such an intriguing look into the Air Force, day two provided me with a valuable learning experience about the efforts of the Navy. I was happy to be able to share several photos and short descriptions of Naval Base San Diego, the USS Makin Island and the submarine rescue team.

What I maybe didn’t fully have time to address was the priority the Navy places on providing a good quality of life for their military personnel and families. The message was consistently voiced in every briefing, experience and personal interaction. From services and support to family and individual needs, the Navy truly goes the distance.

What also stood out to me was the level of innovation and entrepreneurialism that the Navy demonstrates in order to provide the quality of life. Appropriation dollars are only about 70% of their revenue, so it requires creativity and innovative business thinking to be successful in building the environment so important to their goal.

Today is a look inside the Marine Corps. They’ve already indicated no photography, so today’s blog might be photo-light.

Thanks for checking in.

 

Talking Michigan and Police Escorts at the Pentagon

By: Tammy Carnrike

Chamber COO Tammy Carnrike participated in the Joint Civilian Orientation Conference (JCOC), a program sponsored by the Secretary of Defense for civilian public opinion leaders interested in growing their knowledge of the military and national defense issues. JCOC is the oldest existing Department of Defense outreach program having been held more than 81 times since its inception in 1948. Tammy spent five days in the Western U.S. visiting each branch of the U.S. military and learning about the readiness of the armed forces and our nation’s defense policies.

This morning started at 6 a.m. with a quick breakfast. Then, we were off to the Pentagon. We received a police escort from the hotel into the Pentagon and were met by members of the Honor Guard representing Army, Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps. I don’t believe I’ve ever had a police escort – pretty cool!

We received three hours of briefing on the structure of the Department of Defense, various defense policies and the strategic planning and operations that go into protecting our nation. Everywhere I turn Michigan is always with me!In my group is an entrepreneur from New Jersey who is a Leadership Detroit graduate. Today, our briefing was kicked off with a video produced in cooperation between Kid Rock and the Department of Defense – some of you may know the song, “Warrior.” The song and the video is a very moving recognition of the importance of our men and women in uniform and the role they play.

Further into the briefing, we heard from the director of operations for the Joint Chiefs of Staff who immediately showed his pride in the Detroit Tigers being in first place in their division after sweeping the White Sox this weekend. In meeting my fellow participants, I’ve been talking about the great things happening in Detroit and Michigan, and have already made a connection for a business attraction opportunity for the Chamber’s Maureen Krauss.

We’re now on our way to Andrew Air Force Base to be loaded onto a C-17 for our first destination – and it’s going to be hot!

Stay tuned!

Henry Ford Health System’s Nancy M. Schlichting to Lead Chamber Board, New Directors Announced for 2012-2013 Program Year

DETROIT, July 20, 2012 – The Detroit Regional Chamber has announced the election of Nancy M. Schlichting, CEO of Henry Ford Health System, as chair of its Board of Directors for the 2012-2013 program year. She succeeds Chip McClure, chairman, CEO and president of Meritor, Inc, who remains on the Chamber’s Board as immediate past chair.

“What an honor it is to serve this Board and this community as a part of the Detroit Regional Chamber,” Schlichting said. “It is a critical time for our region, state and country. I think the opportunities we have with the Chamber to make a big difference are exceedingly important. There’s momentum in this city and in this region that we haven’t had in a long time.”

Most recently, Schlichting served as chair of the Chamber’s 2012 Mackinac Policy Conference, the state’s premier public policy event, where approximately 1,500 top business, political and community leaders from across the state gathered to focus on creating a more globally and economically competitive Michigan. Under Schlichting, the Conference featured many prominent regional change-makers and national speakers and focused on collaboration, innovation and the 21st century global marketplace.

The 2013 Mackinac Policy Conference, which will be held from Wednesday, May 29 to Friday, May 31, will be chaired by the Chamber’s First Vice Chairman Joseph L. Welch, chairman, president and CEO of ITC Holdings Corp.

In addition to announcing the new chair, the Chamber welcomes the following new directors to the Board:

Brett Bernard, President, Michigan Market, Bank of America
Randall Book, Senior Vice President, Colliers International
Timothy Bryan, Chairman and CEO, GalaxE.Solutions
Mark Davidoff, Michigan Managing Partner, Deloitte LLP
John Fikany, Vice President, U.S. Commercial Sector, Microsoft, Inc.
Rick Going, President, Michigan Division, The Kroger Company
Tricia Keith, Vice President, Corporate Secretary and Services, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan
George Lenyo, Partner, Ernst & Young
Ryan Maibach, President, Barton Malow Company
Kevin McKervey, Shareholder of International Services, Clayton McKervey PLLC
Mike Miller, Director, Business and Industrial Markets and Ann Arbor Office, Google, Inc.
Patricia Mooradian, President, The Henry Ford
Brian O’Connell, Regional Director State Government Relations, General Motors
Heather Paquette, Managing Partner, KPMG LLP
Stephen Polk, Chairman, President and CEO, R.L. Polk

“We added some tremendous leaders to our Board. Their vision and commitment to our region will help drive the Chamber’s efforts to moving the economic needle in Southeast Michigan,” said Chamber President and CEO Sandy K. Baruah. “I look forward to working with them in the upcoming year to move our city and region forward.”

For a full listing of Chamber Board members, click here.

About the Detroit Regional Chamber
With over 20,000 members and affiliates, that employ over three quarters of a million workers, the Detroit Regional Chamber is one of the largest chambers of commerce in the country. The Chamber’s mission is carried out through business attraction efforts, advocacy, strategic partnerships and providing valuable benefits to members. For more information, please visit detroitchamber.com.

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Michigan governor finalizing plan to raze empty Detroit homes

From Reuters
July 18, 2012
By: Julie Halpert 

(Reuters) – As the next step in an April deal between financially strapped Detroit and the state of Michigan, Governor Rick Snyder is finalizing a plan to tear down thousands of abandoned houses in a bid to make the city safer.

Detroit has been hard-hit over the past four decades by a steep drop in population, a steadily eroding tax base and crippling budget deficits, resulting in countless barren streets punctuated by vacant lots and burned-out buildings.

The state plan, likely to be announced early next month, is part of a financial stability agreement reached in April that headed off the appointment of an emergency city manager, which Detroit had opposed.

Detroit Mayor Dave Bing’s administration already has demolished 4,500 “dangerous and abandoned buildings,” according to press secretary Naomi Patton, and plans to tear down another 1,500 vacant structures by the end of September — part of Bing’s pledge three years ago to demolish 10,000 derelict buildings by the end of his term in late 2013.

In a statement, the mayor said, “We welcome the governor’s efforts . . . Tangible assistance from the state is critical to our efforts to transform Detroit.”

As Detroit struggles with a $197 million budget deficit, Snyder has looked at a variety of state actions to support the city. The financial stability agreement outlined a plan to improve the quality of life and safety for Detroiters, including demolition as a way to address blight.

“We’re working with a variety of state departments and agencies to coordinate in an unprecedented way the work that gets done,” said Sara Wurfel, Snyder’s press secretary.

In addition to razing houses, she said, the governor is considering better public lighting and coordination between the state and city police departments on an ongoing “safe routes to schools” program.

“This is more than tearing down structures. We’re trying to develop a community approach to making sure there are safe, stable neighborhoods” in Detroit, Wurfel said of the plan, which she called a “work in progress.”

The governor is in the process of identifying pilot neighborhoods for the effort, Wurfel said, with the initial focus on the city’s east, southwest and northwest sides.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is compiling a geo-mapping and coding effort to detail information on the structures to help guide decisions on which buildings will be demolished and provide a better estimate of the costs involved, Wurfel said. She said the governor is exploring multiple funding options.

Snyder appointee Roy Roberts, emergency manager of Detroit’s public schools, said the governor’s plan coincides with his work to make schools the “hub of the community.”

Sandy Baruah, CEO of the Detroit Regional Chamber, said the actions will help give Detroit a more vibrant urban core.

“The effort really aligns with what the mayor is doing to accelerate the clearing of dilapidated buildings,” Baruah said. But he added that tearing down buildings is not enough. The newly cleared land must be usable for community gardens or other public projects.

Among the state agencies involved are the Department of Treasury, the Michigan Land Bank, the Michigan State Housing Development Authority, the Department of Human Services and the Michigan State Police. Also involved are the Detroit mayor’s office, Detroit Public Schools and a variety of private sector, nonprofit and neighborhood organizations.

(Reporting by Julie Halpert in Ann Arbor, Mich.; editing by Matthew Lewis)

Enhancing the Talent Pipeline: Near-term and Long-term solutions to fill your talent needs

MICHauto hosted “Enhancing the Talent Pipeline:  Near-term and Long-Term solutions to fill your talent needs” on Monday, July 9, 2012 at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago – Detroit Branch.

Since its launch in January, MICHauto has been hard at work building a coalition of industry executives, developing Michigan-centric promotional materials, engaging in business attraction activities, and connecting stakeholders to address the industry’s engineering talent shortage.  The Detroit Regional Chamber’s MICHauto program hosted an event focused on increasing the number of engineers in the talent pipeline and introducing new programs that assist private industry in solving their immediate engineering needs.  Attendees were educated on four topics: private industry involvement in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education reform; corporate immigration assistance and foreign-born recruitment; the utilization of academia’s research and development capabilities; and a unique engineering internship program.

Find presentations from the event below (Click the presentation name to view in PDF Format):

Athena Trentin, Program Director, Global Talent Retention Initiative of Southeast Michigan

Dennis Atkinson, Director of Corporate Engagement/Michigan Corporate Relations Network, Wayne State University

Rebecca Wenglinski, Program Manager, Talent Enhancement, Michigan Economic Development Corporation

Dr. Joachim Wolschendorf, CTO and Vice President of the Vehicle and Drivetrain Engineering Division, FEV, Inc.

For more information on MICHauto, contact Rob Luce at 313.596.0383.    This event was presented in strategic partnership with the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) with presenting sponsorship from Warner, Norcross, and Judd, LLP.