Detroit Regional Chamber Announces Plunkett Cooney’s CEO, Henry B. Cooney, As 2014 Mackinac Policy Conference Chair

MACKINAC ISLAND, May 31, 2013 Today, the Detroit Regional Chamber announced Plunkett Cooney President and CEO Henry B. Cooney as Chair of the 2014 Mackinac Policy Conference. Cooney will succeed 2013 Conference Chair Joseph L. Welch, chairman, president and CEO of ITC Holdings Corp., and help lead the Chamber’s efforts in planning and hosting the 2014 Conference.

“Plunkett Cooney has been a long-time supporter of the Mackinac Policy Conference because it’s a one-of-kind program which also happens to be one of the preeminent policy events in the nation,” Cooney said. “The Conference has evolved into a statewide conversation where leaders from throughout Michigan come together to discuss the critical issues facing our state. I’m honored to be the 2014 Chair and look forward to help driving that conversation.”

Cooney has served as president and CEO of Plunkett Cooney since 1998.  Plunkett Cooney, which is celebrating its centennial anniversary this year, employs over 150 attorneys in nine Michigan cities, Columbus, Ohio and Indianapolis, Indiana. The firm provides a range of transactional and litigation services.

“Hank Cooney is one of the leading attorneys in Michigan, is president of a very well respected law firm, Plunkett Cooney, and has a long history of commitment to Detroit and the region,” Detroit Regional Chamber President and CEO Sandy K. Baruah said. “I am honored that he will lend his perspective and leadership to the 2014 Mackinac Policy Conference.”

“Hank will add a new and different perspective to the Mackinac Policy Conference. I’m delighted that he has accepted the chair role and am looking forward to working with him. I’m confident he’ll enjoy the experience – I know I did,” Welch said.

Following the announcement of Cooney as Conference Chair, the Chamber released the dates for the 2014 Mackinac Policy Conference, which will take place from Wednesday, May 28 through Friday, May 30.

Detroit Regional Chamber 2013 Mackinac Policy Conference
The Mackinac Policy Conference – the Detroit Regional Chamber’s annual event brings together business and government to re-energize Michigan. Since 1981, the Conference has provided access to Michigan’s top business professionals, legislative leaders, corporate CEOs, entrepreneurs and veteran regional champions. Approximately 1,600 attendees gathered for the 2013 Conference, held May 29 – May 31 at the historic Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island.

About the Detroit Regional Chamber

With over 20,000 members and affiliates, that employ over three quarters of a million workers, the Detroit Regional Chamber is one of the largest chambers of commerce in the country. The Chamber’s mission is carried out through business attraction efforts, advocacy, strategic partnerships and providing valuable benefits to members. For more information, please visit detroitchamber.com.

Detroit Chamber Study: More College Grads Staying In Michigan

From CBS Local

By Matt Roush

May 30, 2013

MACKINAC ISLAND (WWJ) – An increased number of recent graduates of Michigan’s public universities are remaining in the state after graduation, according to preliminary survey results released by the Detroit Regional Chamber at the Mackinac Policy Conference Thursday.

The survey indicated that 63 percent of the targeted group of graduates remained in the state, a 12 percentage point increase from a survey of a comparable group in 2007.

“Talent retention is a key driver of economic vitality,” said Benjamin Erulkar, vice president of economic development for the Detroit Regional Chamber. “States that continue to lose their talented graduates will fall behind in the global economy. While this survey is clearly good news, there is a lot of work to do to increase Michigan’s success in talent retention and development.”

The targeted group identified by the survey consisted of single students younger than 28 who had graduated in May 2012 and were no longer in school. The survey results showed that:

• Jobs — either having one or desiring to have one — are the driving factor in keeping recent graduates in Michigan.
• Those graduates who leave Michigan generally do so for higher-paying jobs than jobs held by those who stay in the state.
• A majority of those who left Michigan did so in search of other urban experiences or areas with more public transportation.

“The better we understand the relationship between mobility, employment and place as it pertains to the decisions people make after graduation, the better positioned Michigan will be to retain and attract the talent it needs to compete globally,” said Michael A. Finney, president and CEO of the MEDC. “Graduates are one of our state’s greatest resources and we need to continue to showcase to them the great professional and personal opportunities in our state.”

The survey was convened by the Detroit Regional Chamber with funding support from the Michigan Economic Development Corp, the Presidents Council of State Universities of Michigan, and the Michigan Municipal League. iLabs, the University of Michigan-Dearborn’s Center for Innovation Research, surveyed 7,054 graduates of Michigan public universities in response to over 41,000 emails sent between late-January and March 2013.

Michigan Future Inc. conducted the 2007 study, providing the basis for comparison to the survey of 2012 graduates. The state’s 15 public universities have conferred more than 60,000 degrees over each of the past five years with increases each year.

“Our universities continue to produce top-notch graduates and we lose out on several fronts when they leave our state,” said Dr. Michael A. Boulus, executive director, of the Presidents Council of State Universities of Michigan. “Highly trained graduates bolster our communities and workforce, and define our future. We look forward to studying this issue further to ensure more of our graduates stay right here in the Great Lakes state.”

U.S. facing crisis in education, reformer says on Mackinac Island

From Detroit Free Press

By Kathleen Gray and Matt Helms

May 30, 2013

MACKINAC ISLAND — At a time when the nation is spending a record amount of money on public education, the results in student achievement are disappointing at best, education reformer Michelle Rhee said today at the Detroit Regional Chamber’s Mackinac Policy Conference.

“We are facing a crisis as a nation,” she said. “The children who are in school today will be the first generation who are less well educated than their parents.”

Rhee, who was chancellor of the Washington, D.C., public schools and now heads the StudentsFirst group in California, calls herself a lifelong Democrat; but she’s been a controversial figure in education circles, especially among teachers because of her support for vouchers and the Educational Achievement Authority.

“We have to begin to see education as a bipartisan issue — one that we can all come together on,” she said. “The politics of education have become more polarized than anything else.”

Three things are needed to help boost public education and student achievement, she said: valuing teachers for their performance, not their seniority; developing education policy with children, rather than politics, in mind, and giving children realistic goals instead of rewarding them just for showing up.

“We spend more time trying to make our children feel good about themselves, that we’ve lost sight of actually making them good at anything,” Rhee said.

Michigan has become a leader in education reform, she said, ranging from a recent bill that would base teacher salaries on performance, to turning failing schools over to the state-run Education Achievement Authority.

“As we look across the nation, Michigan has been one of the most aggressive states on education reform,” Rhee said. “These are some of the innovations and initiatives that are going to lead the country in the next few years.”

Also on Mackinac Island:

Westland mayor tests a run for county exec

The annual Detroit Regional Chamber policy conference has launched many a political career, and 2013 is no exception.

Westland Mayor Bill Wild, a 45-year-old Democrat, was up on the island this week testing the waters for a possible run against Wayne County Executive Robert Ficano.

“We’re getting organized. We’re getting our team together,” Wild said. “There are a lot of people looking for an alternative.”

Wild isn’t the only one thinking about a new job. Detroit Mayor Dave Bing didn’t discount a run for county executive during a session Wednesday on the island.

“I’m putting a committee together to explore a run for Wayne County executive,” he said. “I’m open-minded. And I’m healthy, physically, anyway.”

Wild has been the mayor of Westland for seven years and was a city councilman for six years before that. He also ran an auto recycling shop in Wayne for more than 20 years.

“We’ve been really successful in Westland, and a lot of things we’re doing would translate well to the county,” he said.

Ficano, whose administration has been embroiled in a corruption controversy for the past two years, also is up on the island and made the rounds of radio programs today. Although he hasn’t officially announced it, he is expected to run for re-election.

Private foundation raises $60 million to help EAA

From The Detroit News

By Chad Livengood

May 30, 2013

Mackinac Island — Gov. Rick Snyder and leaders of a private foundation said Thursday $59.7 million has been raised to help the Education Achievement Authority’s takeover of persistently failing schools, create a new college scholarship for Detroit students and fund other initiatives in the city.

Snyder announced the new fundraising total here at the Detroit Regional Chamber’s annual policy conference, where supporters of the EAA were praising the school reform district’s efforts to turn around 15 chronically failing Detroit schools.

“This is a big deal folks, changing the lives of those kids,” Snyder said. “(The EAA) is at the forefront of education innovation.”

The announcement comes as the Snyder administration is struggling to get the Legislature to codify the EAA in state law and make it a freestanding school district with a process for taking over schools on the state’s list of 140 persistently failing schools.

Before the announcement Thursday, school groups launched a new website, InsideTheEAA.com, making public EAA records obtained by Democratic lawmakers, the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan and education researchers through Freedom of Information Act requests.

Snyder’s announcement also comes less than a week after The Detroit News reported on the EAA’s early funding problems as well as inflated claims the authority made to win a $35.4 million federal grant for a five-year merit pay program.

The Michigan Education Achievement Foundation, a charity Snyder’s office set up to raise private money for the EAA, has a goal of raising $100 million, foundation Chairman Steve Hamp said.

“Forty million is still a big number,” said Hamp, former president of The Henry Ford and a former Ford Motor Co. executive.

While most of the money comes from foundations and private donors, $10 million of the sum includes money the Legislature appropriated last summer to assist the EAA in bringing 15 Detroit schools up to code before the authority took them over in September. Lawmakers used money from a settlement with banks over mortgage foreclosure practices to provide EAA capital improvement funds.

Detroit native and philanthropist Eli Broad’s foundation has pledged $10 million to the EAA, Snyder said Thursday. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s foundation has given a $10 million challenge grant that requires the MEEF to raise matching funds.

“So those of you who haven’t given and were about to come up, bring your checkbook,” Snyder said.

Carol Goss, chair of the EAA board, said the fundraising effort will underwrite a new two-year scholarship program for any graduate of a public school in Detroit to attend one of five community colleges in southeast Michigan.

Approximately $5 million is being set aside from the $100 million fundraising goal to fund the Detroit Scholarship Program for three years, Hamp said.

Since being formed in 2011, the MEEF has raised approximately $23 million in cash donations, with the remainder being pledged over the next five years, Hamp said.

Hamp said $78 million of the $100 million goal has been earmarked for the EAA and about $14 million was transferred to the EAA this school year to help with startup costs.

The remaining $17 million will go toward funding the Michigan Future Schools’ development of new high schools in Detroit for charter schools and Detroit Public Schools and hiring Teach for America teachers to work in city schools, Goss said.

Some of those Teach for America teachers will work in EAA schools, said Dan Varner, CEO of Excellent Schools Detroit.

Not an experiment

Because of a shortfall in federal funds, the EAA has struggled with cash-flow issues and has relied on $12 million in loans and $2 million advancement of its state aid. The $12 million in loans were facilitated through Detroit Public Schools, although the cash-strapped school district made money through process fees, records show.

Despite the financial struggles, EAA boosters point to the authority’s internal test scores that show students are learning more this year than they did when DPS ran the schools through a different learning style, longer school day and academic year.

“This is not an experiment, this works,” Hamp said.

Goss, president and CEO of The Skillman Foundation in Detroit, said the EAA must be given a chance to turn around failing schools and “correct any missteps that are made.”

“This presents the best opportunity to change education outcomes for all of our children,” Goss said.

clivengood@detroitnews.com
(517) 371-3660
Twitter.com/ChadLivengood

Snyder launches website for statewide volunteer initiative

From The Detroit News

By Gary Heinlein

May 30, 2013

Gov. Rick Snyder has launched a website where Michiganians can find opportunities to become “ambassadors” for the state by volunteering for activities such as community projects and student mentoring.

Snyder announced the initiative, “Let’s Do Something, Michigan!”, Thursday during the Detroit Regional Chamber’s annual Mackinac Island policy conference.

The website where opportunities will be listed is DoSomethingMichigan.com.

Those who sign up on the website will be directed to volunteer projects compiled by D:hive Detroit, the Michigan Community Service Commission and more than 100 other organizations, Snyder said.

Jeanette Pierce, community relations director for D:hive Detroit, said volunteers can improve the state.

“Whether it is sharing your favorite good news fact or getting connected with the volunteer opportunities in your neighborhood, I encourage everyone to become a Michigan Ambassador,” she said in a statement.

Would-be volunteers also can text “ACTION” to 25827 or call (855) 440-6424. Snyder said his staff will help them get matched up with volunteer opportunities.

“Every Michigander can make a difference in their community and in our state,” he said.”This new initiative makes it easy for people to take that first step to get involved.”

gheinlein@detroitnews.com
(517) 371-3660

Donors boost EAA $59.7M

From The Detroit News

By Jennifer Chambers and Chad Livengood

May 31, 2013

Mackinac Island — Gov. Rick Snyder and national school reformer Michelle Rhee urged policymakers and financial donors Thursday to help improve Michigan’s education system.

The Republican governor and leaders of a private foundation announced Thursday at the Detroit Regional Chamber’s policy conference that $59.7 million has been raised to help the Education Achievement Authority’s takeover of persistently failing schools and other initiatives. They include creating a college scholarship for Detroit students.

“This is a big deal, folks, changing the lives of those kids,” Snyder said at the conference, where supporters praised the school reform district’s efforts to turn around 15 chronically failing Detroit schools.

“(The EAA) is at the forefront of education innovation,” he said.

Before the announcement, school groups critical of the EAA launched a website called InsideTheEAA.com, making public records of the district obtained through Freedom of Information Act requests by Democratic lawmakers, the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan and education researchers.

The Snyder administration is struggling to get the Legislature to codify the EAA in state law and make it a free-standing school district with a process for taking over schools on the state’s list of 140 persistently failing schools. Last week, The Detroit News reported on the EAA’s early funding problems, as well as inflated claims the authority made to win a $35.4 million federal grant for a teacher merit-pay program.

The Michigan Education Achievement Foundation — a charity Snyder’s office set up to raise private funds for the EAA and other efforts — has set $100 million as its goal, said Steve Hamp, the foundation chairman.

While most of the money comes from foundations and private donors, $10 million comes from funds the Legislature appropriated last summer to assist the EAA in bringing 15 Detroit schools up to code before the authority took them over in September. Lawmakers used money from a settlement with banks over mortgage foreclosure practices to provide the EAA with capital improvement funds.

Detroit native and philanthropist Eli Broad’s foundation has pledged $10 million, Snyder said Thursday. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s foundation has given a $10 million challenge grant that requires the MEAF to raise matching funds.

“So those of you who haven’t given and were about to come up, bring your checkbook,” Snyder said.

Carol Goss, president and CEO of The Skillman Foundation in Detroit, said the EAA must be given a chance to turn around failing schools and “correct any missteps that are made.”

“This presents the best opportunity to change education outcomes for all of our children,” said Goss, who also chairs the EAA board.

Rhee, a former Washington, D.C., schools chancellor and a Democrat who embraces school choice and vouchers, praised Michigan’s educational reform efforts as a possible model for the nation.

“Michigan … has been one of the most aggressive states on education reform, with the governor and the Legislature leading the way with the EAA, taking over low-performing schools and work on teacher quality,” she said. “These are the innovations and initiatives that are going to lead the country. I’m actually very encouraged.”

Rhee, who runs the Students First reform group in Sacramento, Calif., also backed a merit-pay bill that is proceeding through the Michigan Legislature.

“Teachers matter. They matter tremendously. We need to think of what we do to make sure there is a highly effective teacher in front of every classroom every day,” said Rhee, a former teacher. “Michigan has begun to make big strides in this area … with the merit-pay bill. Those are the kinds of policies we need to put in place to make sure teachers are valued in society in the right way.”

Rhee backed Snyder by encouraging Michigan’s GOP-dominated Legislature not to stall the implementation of the Common Core curriculum standards.

“I believe public education is supposed to be the great equalizer in our country … so every single kid can have an equal shot in life,” Rhee said. “That is not the reality for the vast majority of kids living in inner cities. If you live in Bloomfield Hills and Detroit, you are getting two wildly different educational experiences. That’s an injustice.”

jchambers@detroitnews.com
(313) 222-2269

Michigan retaining more recent college grads, survey finds

From The Detroit News
By Kim Kozlowski
May 30, 2013

More young people are staying in Michigan after graduating from college, with job opportunities driving the brain gain, according to a preliminary survey released today at the Mackinac Policy Conference.

The study, convened by the Detroit Regional Chamber, showed that 12 percent more graduates are staying in the state after graduation compared with five years ago. Fifty-one percent of recent college graduates stayed in Michigan in 2007 when a similar study was done. The latest study shows 63 percent are now staying.

Jobs were the main reason graduates remained in Michigan, the study showed. Those who leave generally land higher-paying positions outside of Michigan, or are searching for a vibrant urban environment such as Chicago, which is a top destination for Michigan graduates.

“Talent retention is a key driver of economic vitality,” said Benjamin Erulkar, senior vice president of economic development for the chamber. “States that continue to lose their talented graduates will fall behind in the global economy.”

The survey included students younger than 28, who had graduated in May 2012 and were no longer in school.

It was conducted with financial support from the Presidents Council, State Universities of Michigan, the Michigan Municipal League and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, which is actively trying to lure Michigan natives living elsewhere back to the state.

Among those who are staying in Michigan is Philip Lewis, who graduated with a sociology degree from Michigan State University earlier this month. Lewis will be teaching in Detroit Public Schools as part of Teach for America, a nonprofit that enlists college graduates and professionals to teach in urban and rural schools for two years. A native Detroiter, Lewis said he wanted to stay in Michigan.

“I felt like I needed to be here to help the youth,” said Lewis, 22. “I felt like it was my responsibility as a Detroiter to help however I can, and education is probably the best place to start.”

Some out-of-state students, such as Kayla Thompson, also plan to stick around in the Great Lakes State after graduation.

Thompson, 22, is originally from a suburb south of Chicago. She graduated earlier this month from Western Michigan University with a degree in business administration and landed a job at ad agency Campbell Ewald. She will start working for the company in Warren and then in downtown Detroit when the company moves its headquarters early next year.

“There were a lot more opportunities here than in Chicago,” said Thompson. “There was more of a need for younger people who want to be in the city. I definitely want to move to Detroit. It’s just more alive down there. It’s kind of like a mini-Chicago.”

The survey comes as more business and political leaders are clamoring for Michigan to make a bigger investment in higher education so it can become a top state for jobs, personal income and economic growth.

“It’s no great surprise that when the economy comes back, we are keeping more kids in Michigan,” said Doug Rothwell, CEO and president of Business Leaders for Michigan, an organization of top leaders from the state’s largest companies and universities. “Our diversification is happening … and these are the jobs that are doing terrific here in Michigan and kids are going into today.”

But Michigan is still fighting the lure of Chicago, which attracts many Michigan graduates such as Ryan Van Bergen. He moved there in January to take a position as an account manager for a manufacturing company after graduating from the University of Michigan in December 2011.

Van Bergen, 24, likes Chicago, and all that it has to offer. But he wouldn’t mind moving back closer to Whitehall, his hometown on the west side of Michigan.

“I could go and play a round of gold with my dad,” Van Bergen said.

kkozlowski@detroitnews.com
(313) 222-2024

Detroit Mayoral Candidates Discuss 2013 Election Issues During PAC Forum

Four candidates in the 2013 Detroit mayoral race gathered on the 2013 Mackinac Policy Conference stage this evening to discuss election issues with moderators Nolan Finley, editorial page editor, The Detroit News, and Stephen Henderson, editorial page editor, Detroit Free Press. Candidates included former Detroit Medical Center CEO Mike Duggan; State Rep. Fred Durhal Jr. (D-Detroit); former State Rep. Lisa Howze; and Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon.

The candidates discussed pressing election issues including the emergency manager, housing abandonment and blight, city crimes, insurance and taxes, and public safety. The candidates also focused on the importance of the neighborhoods and the role community and environment play in the city’s future. The candidates engaged in a lively discussion on all of these topics and voiced their views while sharing what they each feel they bring to the mayoral seat.

This session was sponsored by JP Morgan Chase & Co. Michigan PAC.

Michigan can’t let economic momentum slow

From The Detroit News

By Daniel Howes

May 29, 2013

Four years into Detroit’s automotive revival and two-plus years into a fiscal re-engineering in Lansing, the hard work is beginning to pay handsome dividends for Michigan and to buoy the confidence of its business community.

Job creation is up and the unemployment rate is down. Business investment in the state is growing, a budget surplus is expanding, and the downward arc of Detroit’s financial collapse now is under the unprecedented scrutiny of a Gov. Rick Snyder-appointed emergency manager and his high-priced team of restructuring experts.

Progress? Yes, particularly when the alternative is chronic dysfunction and denial accomplishing little. But as 1,600 of the state’s business and political convene on Mackinac Island today for the Detroit’s Regional Chamber’s Mackinac Policy Conference, the truth is that the long-overdue transformation of Michigan and its largest city into economically competitive forces only is just beginning — and it is not assured.

“Detroit is a city, a region, in transition,” Chamber President Sandy Baruah said in an interview. “Everything is in transition here. An inflection point? Absolutely. The state has done a lot of what the state needs to do to lay the groundwork for economic competitiveness.

“We know where we’re going to end up. The (auto) companies … have made that turn around the corner. The state is making the turn. The urban areas, especially Detroit, are further back in the train. We know we’re going to end up in a much better place.”

Getting there is the hard part. The restructuring of Detroit promises to be a painful, even embarrassing, process. To share sacrifice and satisfy creditors, the workout is potentially as likely to claim Belle Isle, the city’s Water and Sewerage Department or even gems held by the Detroit Institute of Arts as it almost certainly will claim chunks of pension and health care obligations to city employees.

Michigan and its largest city are at an inflection point, a pivot likely to determine whether Detroit can shed the bad habits and contention of the past to become something new that works. Will the state’s historic gambit to seize control of the city’s financials and operations with appointment of Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr culminate in a workout that delivers in ways the smart people envision?

Or will the process further beggar the services and assets of the poorest major city in America, sullying yet again the image of a metropolitan area that accounts for nearly half the state’s population and marking it globally as a cultural wasteland predisposed to making the wrong decisions?

Many answers are likely to come over the balance of the year, in the details of official EM orders and probable court filings of aggrieved parties. The consequences would have profound implications for the state’s business climate, as well as Detroit’s ability to leverage its incipient downtown renaissance into a force that benefits its neighborhoods and tax base.

“Detroit is the last large piece of the puzzle,” DTE Energy Co. CEO Gerry Anderson wrote in an email. “It is the one part of our state that is viewed by the outside world as ‘not yet working.’ Investors view Michigan far differently than they did five years ago.

“Our core industries have dealt with their legacy issues and are now more fundamentally competitive. Our state government addressed its structural deficit and Michigan is now viewed as among the most financially sound states.” Detroit “must deal with its legacy issues and put itself back on sound financial footing. The success of the EM process, therefore, is critical to the city’s future vibrancy.”

If there’s an unofficial theme to a Mackinac conference heavy on themes of education, entrepreneurship and global competitiveness, as well as a session devoted to Mayor Dave Bing riffing on the makings of his legacy at City Hall, it’s “What Will Orr Do?”

The Washington bankruptcy lawyer-turned-EM won’t be on the island to offer answers, despite repeated attempts by ranking chamber officials to woo him to the annual confab.

But speculation about his next moves and whether they might, in fact, include lightening the DIA of some of its works likely will fuel lots of nervous chatter on the Grand Hotel porch.

“So much depends on the emergency manager’s efforts,” Cynthia Pasky, CEO of Detroit-based Strategic Staffing Solutions Inc., wrote in an email. “He has the difficult task of trying to balance the city’s books while at the same time preserving essential services and putting us on a path to sustained fiscal stability.”

That won’t be easy, as a quick read of Orr’s 45-day report to the state Treasury Department makes depressingly clear. The good news is that many of the state’s business drivers, as well as state government, are on demonstrably more solid footing than they were just a few years ago — a potential backstop for Detroit’s worsening financial problems.

The challenge is for the state and its business community to retain a collective competitive edge honed under the duress of the global financial meltdown, the Detroit auto collapse and the national recession that exacerbated it. What’s the biggest threat to Michigan’s momentum, I asked Doug Rothwell, president of Business Leaders for Michigan?

“Complacency with being competitive, a satisfaction with the fact we’re no longer in turmoil” he said in an interview. “Being competitive gets you into the game, but it doesn’t mean you’re going to win. When you step back, there’s still a lot that needs to be fixed or won’t be fixed for some time to come. It’s a work in progress right now.”

daniel.howes@detroitnews.com
(313) 222-2106
Daniel Howes’ column typically runs Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.

Nemeth Burwelll Attorneys Discuss Timely Employment Topics

Nemeth Burwell Attorneys Discuss Timely Employment Issues

Detroit, Mich.—May 29, 2012— Attorneys with Nemeth Burwell, P.C., a Detroit-based law firm exclusively serving employers in the areas of labor and employment law, have been active recently in leading discussions on a variety of employment law topics.

  • Partner Linda Burwell presented Sex and Gender in the Workplace in Light of the EEOC’s 2013-2016 Strategic Enforcement Plan: Developments and Trends in EEO Law on May 10.
  • At the Nemeth Burwell Raising the Bar series on May 8, partner Terry Bonnette, presented 2013 Wage and Hour Boot Camp, highlighting the Department of Labor’s five-year plan.
  • Bonnette presented a Labor and Employment Update and led a discussion titled Legal Issues in Social Media at the Healthcare Association of Michigan (HCAM) UP Conference on May 2.
  • Senior attorney Cliff Hammond presented Labor Trends – Unions: Should I Care? at the Jackson, Mich. Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Conference on April 25.
  • Hammond explored the Right to Work changes in Michigan with Union Avoidance -Unions: Why Should I Care? and led the discussion on the changes the new law brings to employers in Michigan at the April 24 Human Resource Day in Lansing.
  • Partner Tom Schramm discussed Hiring and Firing: Do’s and Don’ts during a Detroit Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) webinar on April 18.
  • Bonnette visited Fox2 News on April 9 to discuss an emerging workplace trend during the Job Shop segment titled, Allergies at the Workplace.
  • Bonnette led the discussion titled Identifying and Dealing with Bullying at Work: A Mock Internal Investigation, at the ICLE in Plymouth on April 5.

About Nemeth Burwell, P.C.: Nemeth Burwell specializes in employment litigation, traditional labor law and management consultation for private and public sector employers. It is the largest women-owned law firm in Michigan to exclusively represent management in the prevention, resolution and litigation of labor and employment disputes.
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