Dickinson Wright Recognized by Managing Intellectual Property IP Stars 2016

Dickinson Wright PLLC is pleased to announce that the firm has been recognized for its Intellectual Property practice in Michigan by Managing Intellectual Property. Four attorneys within the firm were also named 2016 IP Stars by the publication as well.

Dickinson Wright’s Intellectual Property practice in Michigan was ranked as a “Recommended” Practice by Managing Intellectual Property. The publication stated that in the sphere of patent filing and prosecution the firm is highly knowledgeable regarding the automotive industry and the technology involved. They also refer to the firm as a “quality firm that offers a range of services” and that the firm has “good attorneys” that cover “all fronts”.

In addition to the firm’s ranking, Attorneys John S. Artz, Fred W. Hathaway, William H. Honaker, and Daniel D. Quick were selected to Managing Intellectual Property 2016 IP Stars.

John S. Artz is a Member in the firm’s Troy, Mich. office. He has been lead counsel for many companies in intellectual property and commercial litigation matters. He is co-chair of the firm’s Intellectual Property Litigation practice and focuses on patent, trade secret, trademark and copyright litigation. He also actively counsels clients on patent and trademark prosecution as well as clearance matters. Mr. Artz is a past president of the Michigan Intellectual Property Law Association and is currently co-chair of the Intellectual Property Section of the Federal Bar Association for the Eastern District of Michigan.

Fred W. Hathaway is a Member in the firm’s Washington, D.C. office. His practice is focused on domestic and international trademark counseling, clearance and prosecution, trademark litigation before the TTAB, and trademark and domain name disputes and litigation. He is a member of the American Intellectual Property Association, the American Bar Association’s Intellectual Property Law Section, and the Adjunct Professor Special Interest Group of the International Trademark Association.

William H. Honaker is a Member in the firm’s Troy, Mich. office. He has extensive knowledge and expertise in all aspects of patent, trademark, trade secret and copyright matters including litigation in a broad range of technologies/industries. He evaluates patents, trademarks, and copyrights on behalf of clients along with advising clients on the protection of inventions, trademarks and copyrightable subject matter. He is the former Chairman of the State Bar of Michigan’s Intellectual Property Law Section and is a member of the American Intellectual Property Law Association and the International Trademark Association. He is recognized as a leader in his field by Best Lawyers in America and Dbusiness Top Lawyers. He was also listed as a Finalist for Outstanding IP Litigator in Michigan by Managing Intellectual Property Magazine.

Daniel D. Quick is the Practice Department Manager for the firm’s Commercial Litigation, Antitrust & Trade Regulation, Alternative Dispute Resolution and Sports & Entertainment Practice Groups. He served as lead counsel for Universal Music Group and related entities and associated artists in copyright litigation, commercial disputes and defamation actions in several states. He has also served as lead counsel in a variety of other copyright, trade secret and patent litigation matters. Mr. Quick is the former co-chair of the American Bar Association’s Intellectual Property Litigation Committee and is currently the co-chair of the Intellectual Property Subcommittee of the Commercial & Business Litigation Committee.

Managing Intellectual Property’s IP Stars 2016 is the most comprehensive and authoritative guide to leading IP firms and lawyers. Managing Intellectual Property’s researchers in London, New York and Hong Kong collected market information, analyzed it and ranked firms in tiers, based on the feedback received from thousands of practitioners. To learn more, visit www.managingip.com.

About Dickinson Wright PLLC
Dickinson Wright PLLC is a general practice business law firm with more than 400 attorneys among more than 40 practice areas. Headquartered in Detroit and founded in 1878, the firm has fifteen offices, including six in Michigan (Detroit, Troy, Ann Arbor, Lansing, Grand Rapids, and Saginaw) and eight other domestic offices in Columbus, Ohio; Lexington, Ky.; Nashville, Tenn. (2); Las Vegas, Nev.; Phoenix, Ariz.; Reno, Nev.; and Washington, D.C. The firm’s Canada office is located in Toronto.

The firm offers clients a distinctive combination of superb client service and exceptional quality. Dickinson Wright lawyers are known for delivering commercially-oriented advice on sophisticated transactions and have a remarkable record of wins in high-stakes litigation. Dickinson Wright lawyers are regularly cited by Chambers, Best Lawyers, Super Lawyers, and other leading independent law firm evaluating organizations.

Dickinson Wright Attorneys William Honaker and Hal Milton, Jr. Named to National Law Journal’s IP Trailblazers List

Dickinson Wright PLLC is pleased to announce that Attorneys William H. Honaker and Hal Milton, Jr. have been selected for National Law Journal’s 2016 Intellectual Property Trailblazers. The Intellectual Property Trailblazers celebrates the achievements of 50 IP attorneys and others who are innovating in the field, helping to change the way copyright, patent, trademark or licensing law is practiced, or how IP is protected and managed. They will be featured in the May issue of the National Law Journal.

Mr. Honaker is a Member in the firm’s Troy office. With over 25 years of experience, he has extensive knowledge and expertise in all aspects of patent, trademarks, trade secrets and copyright matters including litigation in a broad range of technologies/industries. For his clients, he evaluates patents, trademarks and copyrightable subject matter. His representation includes Fortune 500 clients, small to mid-size privately held companies and startups. He is a member of the State Bar of Michigan, the American Bar Association, the American Intellectual Property Law Association, the International Trademark Association, and the Licensing Executive Society. He is recognized as a leader in his field by Best Lawyers in America, Dbusiness Top Lawyers, and Managing Intellectual Property Magazine. He was also listed as a Finalist for Outstanding IP Litigator in Michigan by Managing Intellectual Property Magazine. Mr. Honaker received his B.S.M.E. from the University of Toledo and his J.D. from the University of Toledo College of Law.

Mr. Milton is Of Counsel in the firm’s Troy office. He manages the Dickinson Wright Intellectual Property Academy to produce high quality patent applications by blending experience and training tools with the enthusiasm of law students and recent law graduates who are also degreed engineers or scientists. He has mentored over 200 new attorneys into the practice of patent law through his training program during the last 45 years. In addition, he serves as lead trial counsel in successfully litigating various patented technologies, assisting new enterprises in protecting their technology to entice investment or the sale of the enterprise, and overseeing the creation of patent, trade secret and trademark portfolios during periods of significant growth for several large corporations. Mr. Milton has taught patent prosecution at a number of law schools and currently teaches the preparation of a patent application at the University of Notre Dame. He is a member of the State Bar of Michigan, the American Intellectual Property Law Association, and the Michigan Intellectual Property Law Association. He received his B.S. from Purdue University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law School.

The Dickinson Wright intellectual property team includes more than 40 attorneys who offer in-depth experience in all aspects of intellectual property, including patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets, employment relationships and intellectual property litigation. Our lawyers regularly counsel clients on IP portfolio management, technology acquisitions, transfers and licensing arrangements, regulatory compliance and legislative developments. Each of our patent lawyers has significant industry experience and technical degrees, and is registered to practice before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Dickinson Wright is one of the very few law firms in the country with its own “Intellectual Property Academy” where practicing lawyers train law students with technical and engineering degrees to become intellectual property attorneys. To learn more about our intellectual property practice, please visit us at www.dickinsonwright.com.

About Dickinson Wright PLLC
Dickinson Wright PLLC is a general practice business law firm with more than 400 attorneys among more than 40 practice areas. Headquartered in Detroit and founded in 1878, the firm has fifteen offices, including six in Michigan (Detroit, Troy, Ann Arbor, Lansing, Grand Rapids, and Saginaw) and eight other domestic offices in Columbus, Ohio; Lexington, Ky.; Nashville, Tenn. (2); Las Vegas, Nev.; Phoenix, Ariz.; Reno, Nev.; and Washington, D.C. The firm’s Canada office is located in Toronto.

The firm offers clients a distinctive combination of superb client service and exceptional quality. Dickinson Wright lawyers are known for delivering commercially-oriented advice on sophisticated transactions and have a remarkable record of wins in high-stakes litigation. Dickinson Wright lawyers are regularly cited by Chambers, Best Lawyers, Super Lawyers, and other leading independent law firm evaluating organizations.

Brooks Kushman Senior Attorney to Discuss Intellectual Property Law for the Growing Business

Brooks Kushman Senior Attorney Timothy Clise will provide an overview of common intellectual property legal issues for growing businesses at Automation Alley on Tuesday, June 14, 2016.

In his presentation, Clise will discuss how changes in IP law over the last 10 years have left companies of all sizes faced with a variety of challenges to maintain a current IP strategy that maximizes protection. He will address critical intellectual property issues, how to overcome common obstacles and strategies to maximize IP protection, while providing practical guidance on trademarks, patents and licensing agreements.

Automation Alley is a technology business association dedicated to growing the economy of Southeast Michigan and enhancing the region’s reputation around the world. The presentation is part of the Automation Alley 7Cs™ program, an initiative aimed at accelerating the growth of manufacturing startups using a customized seven-step process including intense coaching and access to investment and resources.

Clise’s practice at Brooks Kushman focuses on U.S. and international patent preparation and prosecution in the electrical, mechanical and electromechanical arts. He also advises his clients on design, trademarks and trade secrets for developing meaningful, worldwide intellectual property portfolios. As a recognized leader in intellectual property law, Clise has been invited to speak on internal best practices, how to develop meaningful patent portfolios, and routinely speaks in Asia and Europe on various US patent law topics.

Clise holds a Juris Doctor from the University of Dayton and a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from Michigan State University. Prior to joining Brooks Kushman he was an Intellectual Property Attorney for a major wireless communications corporation and Managing Partner of his own Minnesota-based firm.

About Brooks Kushman P.C.
Brooks Kushman P.C. is a leading intellectual property (IP) and technology law firm with offices in Michigan and California, and represents clients nationally and internationally with respect to protection, enforcement and monetization of IP, including patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. The firm has more than 90 intellectual property professionals specializing in various technical disciplines, and has a reputation for providing leading IP counseling with a focus on the business objectives of their clients.

Brooks Kushman counts a number of Fortune 100 companies across a variety of industries among its clients. The firm is also recognized by leading legal publications and rankings, including Corporate Counsel magazine, U.S. News & World Report, Law360, Intellectual Asset Management, Managing Intellectual Property, World Trademark Review, and Intellectual Property Today.

For more information, please visit www.BrooksKushman.com.

The future of Detroit’s schools should take center stage at Mackinac

Michigan Radio

By Jack Lessenberry

May 31, 2016

The Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce’s annual Mackinac Policy Conference starts later today.

A year ago, I would have assumed the election would be center stage. A few months ago, I thought everyone might be talking about infrastructure and Flint. But instead, it’s education.

Detroit is the big elephant filling the Grand Hotel.

The Speaker of the House indicates he and his minions won’t show up on the island unless and until they finish a deal on saving Detroit Public Schools.

Education has indeed become center stage, and not only in Detroit.

There’s a lot of buzz over an Education Trust-Midwest report that shows Michigan schools are on their way to becoming about the worst in the country. Some grumble that the Education Trust data is suspect, that things aren’t quite as bad as they believe.

But nobody is claiming Michigan schools are anything but worse than those of most states.

To quote Sandy Baruah, who heads the Detroit Regional Chamber, “We are going the wrong direction. The world is getting smarter and Michigan is getting dumber.”

He thinks the business community needs to press for tougher new standards, especially for better science, technology, engineering and math education – even if that takes more money.

The first priority, however, has to be Detroit, where the schools have been hemorrhaging money and students for years.

The Chamber of Commerce leaders back the governor’s $715 million plan to fix the schools, as does the state Senate.

But the lower House and Speaker Cotter are adamantly opposed. They want to provide less money – but the major sticking point is the governor’s plan for a Detroit Education Commission. It would have a say in where any new public schools, conventional or charter, could open in the city.

Most educators strongly support this, including some responsible charter school operators, who recognize that some charters are substandard. They also know that cannibalistic and destructive competition has left some areas underserved.

And tens of thousands of students have left for schools entirely outside the city. Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan, a master fixer and compromiser, has rallied a number of charter operators who support the concept of the DEC.

But Dan Quisenberry, the president of the Michigan Association of Public School Academies, the main charter lobbying organization, is no more moderate about charters than the NRA is about gun control.

He demands no restrictions whatsoever.

But he’s beginning to lose some of his more reasonable members, who agreed with Mayor Duggan when he told the Detroit Free Press that education in the city was “a failure all around.”

Personally, I think it was a mistake for the Speaker not to come to Mackinac. It provides a rare opportunity for members of different parties and ideologies to talk to each other.

Once, opposing lawmakers met each other after hours over a glass or on the golf course. Less of that happens in today’s polarized world, and that’s too bad.

The Mackinac Conference is sometimes criticized for seldom producing any lasting or meaningful agreements. That may not be entirely fair. Progress often starts with relationship building.

In today’s term-limited world, that’s harder than ever, and anything that jump-starts the process has to be worth its weight in complimentary cocktail party shrimp.

Jack Lessenberry is Michigan Radio’s senior news analyst. Views expressed in his essays are his own and do not necessarily reflect those of Michigan Radio, its management or the station licensee, The University of Michigan.

View the original article here: http://michiganradio.org/post/future-detroits-schools-should-take-center-stage-mackinac#stream/0

The next 10 years are going to be awesome

The Detroit News 

By Brian David Johnson

May 30, 2016

The future isn’t an accident. The future doesn’t just happen. The future is built every day by the actions of people.

Organizations, governments, corporations and communities build the future. We cannot be passive. We cannot sit back and let the future happen to us. It’s of vital importance that everyone be an active participant in the future. This is especially true as we think about the future of the state of Michigan.

It’s my job to help organizations develop a vision for the future 10 years out. This might sound like science fiction but it’s actually quite pragmatic. The design, planning and development of communities and infrastructure can span a decade of more. Because of this it is of essential today for groups to have a deep understanding and vision for tomorrow.

The process I use to do this is called “futurecasting.” I don’t predict the future. Futurecasting is a framework to develop an actionable vision for tomorrow. Combining social science, technical research, economics, trends, cultural history, expert interviews, and even a little science fiction, futurecasting models what it will feel like to be a human and live a decade from today. Prediction is a fool’s game. But futurecasting allows us to develop an actionable vision for the future and also what needs to be done to design, develop and build that vision.

The next 10 years are going to be awesome. We will see advances in artificial intelligence, robotics, autonomous vehicles, data science, synthetic biology and an interconnected world of sensors and computational intelligence. But all of these advances will mean nothing if we don’t use them to make the lives of people better.

That’s why when we think about the future of Michigan one of the most important questions must ask ourselves is: What kind of future do you want? and also What kind of future do you want to avoid? Because you see when people have an opinion about the future, it matters. These dreams for tomorrow and all the tomorrows of the next generation mean something. They are actually how we change the future.

Over the past two decades as a futurist I’ve learned that the way we change the future is to change the story people tell themselves about the future they will live in. It’s a simple thing but it can have massive effects. If you can change the story that people tell themselves about the future that they will live in—then they will make different decisions. They will take different actions. They will bring about a very different tomorrow.

Our science, technology, communications networks, collaborative tools and funding mechanisms have progressed to the point where today we are only constrained by the limits of our imaginations. Stories are mechanisms for change. Imaging a radically different tomorrow for Michigan is how we change the state’s future and then begin to bring that vision into being.

Brian David Johnson is futurist-in-residence at Arizona State University’s Center for Science and the Imagination.

View the original article here: http://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/2016/05/30/next-years-going-awesome/85178494/

Statement From Detroit Regional Chamber President and CEO on the Need for the Detroit Education Commission

Detroit Regional Chamber President and CEO Sandy Baruah released the following statement on the need for the Detroit Education Commission.

“The Detroit Regional Chamber is a long-standing supporter of choice and charter schools. We know that charters are the most successful and produce the best results in cities where there is a mechanism like the Detroit Education Commission to hold all schools accountable and contribute to the rational opening and closing of schools. The Commission is absolutely necessary to provide Detroit children and their parents the real choice in education they deserve.”

Need for Transit Grows

RTA plan connects region, critical to economic future

By Paul Hillegonds

Leaders from Southeast Michigan and across the state convene at this conference to take on issues vital to our future. Few topics have been on our agenda longer than building a modern, coordinated regional transit system for a more competitive and prosperous region.

This year, the pieces are in place to make history and finally make regional transit a reality for Southeast Michigan, truly connecting Macomb, Oakland, Wayne and Washtenaw counties. In late 2012, county and city leaders, lawmakers, the governor, and business and community leaders came together to create the Regional Transit Authority (RTA). And this week, after nearly two years of public engagement, planning and analysis, the RTA released a cost-effective, achievable and visionary plan that can be put before voters in November.

Since the conversation began decades ago, the need for regional transit has only grown.  Few modern trends rival mobile young talent selecting communities with high-quality transit – with businesses and investment following. A study of 500 corporate relocations found better transit and walkability to be a near universal factor. A survey of 350 national CEOs ranked transit near the top of qualities that matter in considering our region. And Crain’s Detroit found 73 percent of millennials put regional transit at the top of their wish list. If we want to grow our economy and keep our young people here, regional transit is a must.

Transit is about creating and connecting people to opportunities – with jobs, education, and vital services like health care. We are the only major region in the country without true regional transit, and we invest dramatically less in transit than any peer region. Each of our existing providers do the best they can, but these constraints mean only limited connections between Detroit and our suburban communities, and virtually no connections between Metro Detroit and Ann Arbor – or to the airport.  Entire areas – key job centers – are unserved by transit altogether. Service is not frequent enough on key routes to meet community needs.

The impacts are real and profound. Nearly 80 percent of jobs can’t be reached within 90 minutes using public transit. We all know the story of the Walking Man; the reality is similar challenges affect too many fellow Michiganders daily as they strive to get to work, school or the doctor.

The RTA’s master plan will change all of this and move our region into the future. It’s a smart and balanced approach, serving the region equitably and investing resources wisely.

It will deliver Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) on Woodward, Michigan and Gratiot Avenues – providing light rail features, including powerful economic development effects, at a fraction of the cost.  The plan uses existing infrastructure to finally deliver commuter rail between Detroit and Ann Arbor, connecting two major hubs of the regional economy at 1/15th the cost of new rail projects in other cities. And it delivers new, coach-quality express service to the airport.

The RTA plan will also ensure frequent, seamless service on major regional corridors and key connectors instead of today’s fragmented and limited options.  It does this by building on current services and providing the funding and coordination for our existing providers to work together to deliver regional service. This, coupled with targeting investment to routes with the greatest demand, ensures the best use of every cent.

Critically, seniors and people with disabilities will benefit from increased funding for specialized transit, helping advance their independence and quality of life.  And the plan includes opportunities for partnerships with companies like Lyft and Uber, necessary for a forward-thinking system to harness new mobility technologies and address critical challenges like first and last mile service and hard-to-get-to areas.

We have long agreed that regional transit is vital to Southeast Michigan’s ability to grow, compete and meet the needs of our citizens. The way to make it happen is now before us. It is my hope that everyone reading this and attending this conference will get behind this effort. We can make history – if we do it together.

Paul Hillegonds is the chairman of the Regional Transit Authority of Michigan’s Board of Directors and a strong proponent of frequent, reliable and connected regional transit to help bolster economic growth and quality of life for the Southeast Michigan region.

Dickinson Wright Receives Top Rankings by Chambers USA; 34 Attorneys in Michigan Recognized as Leaders in their Fields

Dickinson Wright PLLC is pleased to announce that Chambers USA, publisher of the world’s leading guides to the legal profession, has named Dickinson Wright’s Banking & Finance, Corporate/M&A, Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation, General Commercial Litigation, Labor & Employment, and Real Estate practices as “Top Ranked” in Michigan. Twenty-four attorneys from Dickinson Wright’s Michigan offices were named “Leaders in their Fields”.

London-based publisher Chambers & Partners conducts research into the strengths and reputations of U.S. law firms by state, through in-depth interviews with peers and competing firm attorneys, in-house counsel and significant purchasers of legal services.

Of the “Top Ranked” practices, Dickinson Wright’s General Commercial Litigation practice in Michigan received a Band 1 ranking. Of the 24 attorneys in Michigan ranked by Chambers, the following attorneys received a Band 1 ranking: Steven G. Howell, Banking & Finance: Bankruptcy; Edward H. Pappas, General Commercial Litigation; William P. Shield, Jr., Banking & Finance; and Robert W. Stocker, II, Gaming & Licensing.

Below is a list of Dickinson Wright attorneys in Michigan who were listed in Chambers USA 2016:

Banking and Finance
Craig W. Hammond, Detroit
Colleen M. Shevnock, Ann Arbor
William P. Shield, Jr., Detroit

Banking and Finance: Bankruptcy
Steven G. Howell, Detroit
James A. Plemmons, Detroit
Theodore B. Sylwestrzak, Detroit

Corporate/Mergers & Acquisitions
Richard M. Bolton, Detroit
Mark R. High, Detroit
Michael T. Raymond, Troy

Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation
Cynthia A. Moore, Troy
Jordan Schreier, Ann Arbor

Gaming & Licensing
Robert W. Stocker, II, Lansing

Labor & Employment
Timothy H. Howlett, Detroit

General Commercial Litigation
Kathleen A. Lang, Detroit
Kenneth J. McIntyre, Detroit
Thomas G. McNeill, Detroit
Edward H. Pappas, Troy
Daniel D. Quick, Troy

Real Estate Law
John G. Cameron, Jr., Grand Rapids
James N. Candler, Jr., Detroit
Stephen E. Dawson, Troy
Monica J. Labe, Troy
Leslee M. Lewis, Grand Rapids
Katheryne L. Zelenock, Troy

Chambers USA: America’s Leading Lawyers for Business 2016 is available online at www.chambersandpartners.com/usa.

About Dickinson Wright PLLC
Dickinson Wright PLLC is a general practice business law firm with more than 400 attorneys among more than 40 practice areas. Headquartered in Detroit and founded in 1878, the firm has fifteen offices, including six in Michigan (Detroit, Troy, Ann Arbor, Lansing, Grand Rapids, and Saginaw) and eight other domestic offices in Columbus, Ohio; Lexington, Ky.; Nashville, Tenn. (2); Las Vegas, Nev.; Phoenix, Ariz.; Reno, Nev.; and Washington, D.C. The firm’s Canada office is located in Toronto.

The firm offers clients a distinctive combination of superb client service and exceptional quality. Dickinson Wright lawyers are known for delivering commercially-oriented advice on sophisticated transactions and have a remarkable record of wins in high-stakes litigation. Dickinson Wright lawyers are regularly cited by Chambers, Best Lawyers, Super Lawyers, and other leading independent law firm evaluating organizations.

Butzel Long attorneys named to Chambers USA 2016: Detroit-based law firm increases attorney rankings and recognition in Chambers’ “America’s Leading Lawyers for Business 2016 – The Client’s Guide”

Butzel Long attorneys and practice areas have been recognized by Chambers USA 2016. – America’s Leading Lawyers for Business 2016 – The Client’s Guide.

“We’ve added several attorneys to our listing in Chambers USA, this year,” said Justin G. Klimko, President and Managing Shareholder, Butzel Long. “This recognition is a testament to the caliber of our team of attorneys and their depth and breadth of experience.”

Butzel Long practice areas included in Chambers USA are:

— Corporate/ Mergers and Acquisitions – Michigan

— Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation –Michigan

— Labor and Employment – Michigan

— Litigation: General Commercial – Michigan

Butzel Long attorneys ranked and highlighted in Chambers USA 2016 include:

— Justin G. Klimko – Corporate/ Mergers and Acquisitions

— Stephen A. Bromberg – Real Estate

— David F. DuMouchel – Litigation, White-Collar Crime & Government Investigations

— John P. Hancock, Jr. –Labor and Employment

— Mark Jane – Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation

— Thomas Kabel – Real Estate

— Nancy Keppelman – Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation

— James S. Rosenfeld – Labor & Employment

— Robert B. Stevenson – Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation

— Andrew Stumpff – Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation

— Daniel B. Tukel – Labor and Employment

Other Butzel attorneys recognized by Chambers USA 2016 include:

– Arthur Dudley II

– Nicholas J. Stasevich

– Carey A. DeWitt

– Lynn McGuire

– James Bruno

Justin G. Klimko is President and Managing Shareholder of Butzel Long and serves on the firm’s Board of Directors. He is based in the firm’s Detroit office. Klimko has extensive experience in securities regulation, corporate financing, mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance and general corporate matters, fields in which he has practiced since 1980. Klimko has substantial experience in securities regulation matters for publicly and privately held companies.

Stephen A. Bromberg is Counsel to Butzel Long and based in the firm’s Bloomfield Hills office. He served as a Director and President of Butzel Long. Bromberg has represented borrowers and institutional lenders, purchasers and sellers, non-profit entities and contractors and owners in all kinds of office, commercial shopping center, apartment and subdivisions matters, major construction and zoning matters and workouts, reorganizations and foreclosures, with years of specialization in real estate transactions and litigation.

David F. DuMouchel is a Shareholder practicing in Butzel Long’s Detroit office. He chairs the firm’s Corporate Compliance, Internal Investigations and Criminal Defense practice. DuMouchel’s practice includes white collar criminal defense, professional licensure and criminal health care, criminal IRS investigations of both taxpayers and professionals, SEC enforcement of corporate executives, public corruption, as well as grand jury investigations, internal corporate investigations and compliance.

John P. Hancock, Jr. is a shareholder based in Butzel Long’s Detroit office. His practice focuses on collective bargaining negotiations and arbitrations as well as counseling of both public and private employers. He also has performed extensive employment litigation and OSHA litigation. Hancock has served as chief negotiator in numerous collective bargaining negotiations. A good portion of his practice is devoted to counseling clients on employment issues.

Mark W. Jane is a senior attorney based in Butzel Long’s Ann Arbor office. He practices in the area of ERISA, employee benefits, and executive compensation. He is on the Board of Directors of the Washtenaw County Bar Association, and is a District Representative on the State Bar of Michigan Young Lawyers Section Executive Council.

Thomas A. Kabel is a shareholder based in Butzel Long’s Bloomfield Hills office. He is chair of the firm’s corporate and real estate departments. He concentrates his practice in the area of commercial real estate and real estate-related finance. Kabel has been involved in all facets of acquisition, disposition, leasing, financing and development of real property throughout his career.

Nancy Keppelman is Of Counsel and based in Butzel Long’s Ann Arbor office. She practices in the area of employee benefits and executive compensation law. became a fellow in American College of Employee Benefits Counsel (ACEBC) in 2002.

James S. Rosenfeld is a shareholder practicing in Butzel Long’s Detroit office. He practices in the area of labor and employment law and is the manager of the firm’s Labor and Employment Practice Group.

Bob Stevenson is Counsel and based in Butzel Long’s Ann Arbor office. He practices in the area of employee benefits and executive compensation. He is a charter fellow of the American College of Employee Benefits Counsel Best Lawyer 2013 (ACEBC).

Andrew Stumpff is Of Counsel and based in Butzel Long’s Ann Arbor office. He practices in the area of employee benefits and executive compensation law. He is a Fellow of the American College of Employee Benefits Counsel.

Daniel B. Tukel is a shareholder practicing in Butzel Long’s Detroit office and serves as Chair of the firm’s Labor and Employment Law Department. His practice is devoted to representing both public and private employers in state and federal discrimination and wrongful discharge litigation, as well as traditional labor matters such as collective bargaining and union organizational drives.

About Butzel Long

Butzel Long is one of the leading law firms in the United States. It was founded in Detroit in 1854 and has provided trusted client service for more than 160 years. Butzel’s full-service law offices are located in Detroit, Bloomfield Hills, Lansing and Ann Arbor, Mich.; New York, NY; and, Washington, D.C., as well as alliance offices in Beijing, Shanghai, Mexico City and Monterrey. It is an active member of Lex Mundi, a global association of 160 independent law firms.

Learn more by visiting www.butzel.com or follow Butzel Long on Twitter: https://twitter.com/butzel_long

Brooks Kushman Attorneys Named “IP Stars” by Managing IP

Brooks Kushman is pleased to announce six of the firm’s shareholders have been named “IP Stars” by Managing Intellectual Property (IP) Magazine. This comprehensive guide to leading IP firms and lawyers covers more than 80 countries.

Brooks Kushman attorneys recognized as IP Stars by the publication are President Mark Cantor and Shareholders Frank Angileri, Elizabeth Janda, John LeRoy, Sangeeta Shah and Robert Tuttle.

• Cantor serves as the president of the Brooks Kushman and is one of the founders of the firm. His practices focusing on complex litigation matters in all technology areas, and has been named an “IP Star” since 2013.
• Angileri is co-chair of Brooks Kushman’s Post-Grant Proceedings practice, and focuses on IP litigation. He was also named as Michigan’s “IP Litigator of the Year” for 2015 & 2016.
• Janda serves as chair of Brooks Kushman’s Trademark practice, managing substantial trademark portfolios both domestically and internationally in a variety of industries. She has been on the list of “IP Stars” since 2013.
• LeRoy is chair of Brooks Kushman’s Open Source Compliance practice and focuses his practice on software and electrical patent litigation. He advises companies on the effective use of open source software in their products and creates customized strategies to help them comply with various license terms.
• Shah is Brooks Kushman’s co-chair of Post-Grant Proceedings and Chief Diversity Officer. Her practice is primarily focused on post-grant challenges and patent opinions. She represents several Fortune 500 clients for whom she provides strategic counseling and guidance on their global IP portfolios. She has been on the list of “IP Stars” since 2014.
• Tuttle’s practice at Brooks Kushman focuses on IP litigation. He works closely with clients across a variety of industries on litigation matters covering all aspects of IP strategy including patents, trademarks and trade secrets. Tuttle was named Michigan “IP Litigator of the Year” in 2013 and has been an “IP Star” since 2013.

According to Managing Intellectual Property magazine, IP Stars ratings are based on research of over 1,000 interviews and surveys completed by partners and law firms active in the United States. Additional research is conducted through discussions with clients and leading in-house counsel, while also reviewing public information and coverage.

About Brooks Kushman P.C.
Brooks Kushman P.C. is a leading intellectual property (IP) and technology law firm with offices in Michigan and California, and represents clients nationally and internationally with respect to protection, enforcement and monetization of IP, including patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. The firm has more than 90 intellectual property professionals specializing in various technical disciplines, and has a reputation for providing leading IP counseling with a focus on the business objectives of their clients.

Brooks Kushman counts a number of Fortune 100 companies across a variety of industries among its clients. The firm is also recognized by leading legal publications and rankings, including Corporate Counsel magazine, U.S. News & World Report, Law360, Intellectual Asset Management, Managing Intellectual Property, World Trademark Review, and Intellectual Property Today.

For more information, please visit www.BrooksKushman.com.