Butzel Long attorneys named to DBusiness magazine’s Top Lawyers in metro Detroit 2020

DETROIT, Mich. – Seventy Butzel Long attorneys have been named Top Lawyers in metro Detroit 2020 by DBusiness magazine. The list appears in the November/December 2019 edition. The attorneys and their practice areas are listed below:

Ann Arbor office

— Jennifer A. Dukarski
Copyright Law
Information Technology Law

— Ashley Glime
Copyright Law

— Mark W. Jane
Employee Benefits Law

— Nancy Keppelman
Employee Benefits Law

— Lynn F. McGuire
Employee Benefits Law

— Claudia Rast
Copyright Law
Information Technology Law

— Angela Emmerling Shapiro
Information Management & Discovery Law

— Andrew Stumpff
Employee Benefits Law

Bloomfield Hills office

— Stephen A. Bromberg
Litigation – Real Estate

— Jennifer E. Consiglio
Corporate Law

— Carey A. DeWitt
Labor and Employment Law
Litigation – Labor Employment Benefits

— Damien DuMouchel
White-Collar Criminal Defense

— Theodore R. Eppel
Legal Malpractice Law
Litigation – Antitrust

— Debra A. Geroux
Health Care Law

— Amy L. Glenn
Trusts and Estates

— Beth S. Gotthelf
Energy Law
Environmental Law

— David W. Hipp
Banking & Financial Service Law

— Robert A. Hudson
International Trade Law
Securities Law

— Laura E. Johnson
Corporate Law
Mergers & Acquisitions Law

— Susan L. Johnson
Environmental Law

— Thomas A. Kabel
Banking & Financial Service Law
Real Estate Law

— Kaveh Kashef
Litigation – Real Estate

— Sheldon H. Klein
Antitrust Law
Litigation – Antitrust

— Bushra A. Malik
Immigration Law

— Suzanne M. Miller
Tax Law

— Max J. Newman
Bankruptcy and Creditor /Debtor Rights Law

— Neil Patel
Corporate Law

— Robert P. Perry
Trusts and Estates

— Tom B. Radom
Bankruptcy and Creditor/Debtor Rights Law

— Joseph E. Richotte
Appellate Law

— Craig S. Schwartz
Labor and Employment Law

— Robert H. Schwartz
Health Care Law

— Thomas L. Shaevsky
Employee Benefits Law

— Thomas C. Simpson
Litigation – Real Estate

— Daniel B. Tukel
Labor and Employment Law

— Roxana Zaha
Real Estate Law

Detroit office

— Geaneen M. Arends
Mergers and Acquisitions Law
Real Estate Law

— Linda J. Armstrong
Immigration Law

— Frederick A. Berg, Jr.
Insurance Law

— James C. Bruno
Arbitration
Commercial Law
International Trade Law
Mergers and Acquisitions Law

— Joshua J. Chinsky
White-Collar Criminal Defense

— Maura Corrigan
Appellate Law

— Michael C. Decker
Construction Law
Litigation – Construction

— David J. DeVine
Insurance Law
Litigation — Commercial

— George B. Donnini
White –Collar Criminal Defense

— Arthur Dudley, II
Corporate Law
Mergers & Acquisitions Law

— David F. DuMouchel
Professional Malpractice Law
White-Collar Criminal Defense

— Eric J. Flessland
Construction Law
Litigation – Construction

— Bernard J. Fuhs
Franchise Law
Trade Secrets

— Michael R. Griffie
Labor and Employment Law

— Cynthia J. Haffey
Litigation – Commercial

— Ziyad I. Hermiz
Franchise Law
Litigation – Commercial

— Justin G. Klimko
Corporate Law
Mergers & Acquisitions Law

— Phillip C. Korovesis
Trade Secrets

— Mark R. Lezotte
Health Care Law
Nonprofit/Charities Law

— Clara DeMatteis Mager
Immigration Law

— Paul M. Mersino
Construction Law
Litigation – Commercial
Trade Secrets

— Brett J. Miller
Franchise Law
Labor and Employment Law

— Donald B. Miller
Product Liability

— Reginald A. Pacis
Immigration Law

— James S. Rosenfeld
Labor and Employment Law
Litigation – Labor Employment Benefits

— George Schooff
Intellectual Property and Patent Law
Litigation – Patents

— Bruce L. Sendek
Litigation – Antitrust
Litigation – Commercial

— Ivonne M. Soler
Family Law

— Nicholas J. Stasevich
Commercial Law
Corporate Law
International Trade Law

— Hannah E. Treppa
Labor and Employment Law

— John C. Valenti
Product Liability

— Kurtis T. Wilder
Appellate Law
Arbitration

— James E. Wynne
Product Liability

Lansing office

— James J. Urban
Litigation – Construction

For the list, DBusiness magazine polled 19,000 attorneys in Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw and Livingston counties among 50 legal specialties.

About Butzel Long

Butzel Long is one of the leading law firms in Michigan and the United States. It was founded in Detroit in 1854 and has provided trusted client service for more than 160 years. Butzel’s full-service law offices are located in Detroit, Bloomfield Hills, Lansing and Ann Arbor, Mich.; New York, NY; and, Washington, D.C., as well as an alliance office in Beijing. It is an active member of Lex Mundi, a global association of 160 independent law firms. Learn more by visiting www.butzel.com or follow Butzel Long on Twitter: https://twitter.com/butzel_long

Seven Southfield Attorneys Listed in Best Lawyers®

Southfield, Mich. — Seven attorneys from Foster Swift’s Southfield office were selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America© 2020. Firm-wide, 42 attorneys were included. Each year’s new edition is launched for the following calendar year.

Since it was first published in 1983, Best Lawyers® has become universally regarded as the definitive guide to legal excellence. Best Lawyers lists are compiled based on an exhaustive peer-review evaluation. Lawyers are not required or allowed to pay a fee to be listed; therefore inclusion in Best Lawyers is considered a singular honor. For more information, visit www.bestlawyers.com.

Listed attorneys and their areas of practice are as follows:

Dirk H. Beckwith: Construction Law

Michael R. Blum: Employment Law – Management, Labor Law – Management

Julie I. Fershtman: Commercial Litigation, Insurance Law

Gilbert H. Frimet: Health Care Law

Paul J. Millenbach: Mass Tort Litigation/Class Actions-Defendants

Brian J. Renaud: Administrative/Regulatory Law

Bruce A. Vande Vusse: Medical Malpractice Law – Defendants

Dan Ammann and Julia Steyn Leverage General Motors’ Legacy of Innovation to Lead in a Bold New Technological Era

General Motors Reimagining Personal Mobility

By Daniel Lai

Imagine a world with no cars parked on the sides of streets, minimal traffic congestion, and picking up a friend from the airport is as simple as ordering an autonomous ride from the safety and comfort of your sofa. That reality is not so far off, automakers say.

Catalyzed by the influx of new technology, Michigan’s OEMs are working feverishly on innovative ways to stay ahead of the mobility game, especially as the face of consumers gets younger and preferences shift away from vehicle ownership in favor of convenience.

Recognizing these changing trends, General Motors Co. exploded out of the gate with a flurry of product and partnership announcements this past year. The strategy was led by GM President Dan Ammann, a former Morgan Stanley investment banker who cut his teeth on Wall Street. That experience coupled with a keen forward-thinking prowess has proven to be a golden ticket for the automaker.

Julia Steyn and Dan Ammann introduce GM's new car-sharing service, Maven, which provides customers access to highly personalized, on demand mobility services.

Julia Steyn and Dan Ammann introduce GM’s new car-sharing service, Maven, which provides customers access to highly personalized, on demand mobility services.

In January, GM announced a $500 million investment in San Francisco-based Lyft to put an integrated network of on-demand autonomous vehicles on the roads in the United States. The partnership leverages GM’s deep knowledge of autonomous technology and Lyft’s capabilities in providing a broad range of ride-sharing services. Three months later, GM and Lyft launched a short-term rental program called Express Drive, which provides vehicles to Lyft drivers for a weekly rate. The service rolled out in Chicago, Baltimore, Boston and Washington, D.C.

GM’s increased focus on personal mobility solutions signals a new culture and bold leadership shift to position Michigan’s automotive industry as a formidable leader in autonomous technology research and development.

“We want to make sure that we’re in position that when (customers) think about mobility, they think about us every single step of the way. We are investing very heavily to define the future of personal mobility in the areas of connectivity, car- and ride-sharing, autonomous driving, alternative propulsion, and of course, all of the new technologies that are required to underpin those developments,” Ammann said during keynote remarks at the 2016 Mackinac Policy Conference.

“That’s really important because as we look at consumer behavior, we see a very clear trend where customers are willing to wait for the right vehicles, for the right level of connectivity before they make their purchase decision, we’re seeing increasing evidence of that every day,” Ammann added.

In addition to the Lyft partnership, GM announced a collaboration with MobileEye to crowd-source advanced mapping data for self-driving cars, introduced the Chevrolet Bolt, the first long-range, consumer-friendly electric vehicle, and unveiled its personal mobility brand, Maven.

Currently in 13 markets throughout the United States, the car-sharing service provides access to highly personalized, on-demand vehicles. Maven customers use its app to search for and reserve a vehicle by location or car type and unlock the vehicle with their smartphone.

“With more than 25 million customers around the world projected to use some form of shared mobility by 2020, Maven is a key element of our strategy to changing ownership models in the automotive industry,” Ammann said.

The Maven team is made up of professionals from Google, Zipcar and Sidecar and led by former Alcoa vice president, Julia Steyn. The Detroiter recently sat down with Steyn to talk about Maven, the future of car-sharing, and GM and Detroit’s next steps in the new mobility era.

How would you describe a Maven user?

It is actually really interesting how Maven customers are very different from the traditional way how we sell cars. First of all, it is very simple because in traditional car sales, it is a one-time transaction and you really market a product. With Maven, we want as much repeat use and as often of a repeat use as possible. We are marketing an overall service and the experience to the customers. Just based on the numbers, Maven customers’ average age is 30 and the average income is above $80,000. We’re talking to the customers that we would not have had in the GM brand family. That’s where Maven is so additive to our traditional brands.

What makes Maven unique in the exploding next-generation mobility scene?

We are, as Maven, building on GM’s competitive strength. That comes first and foremost with the breadth of our portfolio. We have anything from Corvettes and the luxury vehicles and Escalades on one end, to the trucks. We are very fortunate that we can tailor the portfolio to our customers regionally.

Secondly, we obviously have the ability with the connection to the vehicle. We have been doing this with OnStar for a long time to create this very on-demand service. It is not only the app, it is the whole experience … how you interact through the phone and the app, and the same phone opens the vehicle and you kind of bring your whole digital life through what we have put through OnStar in the vehicle as well as the dedicated concierges who can curate anything from safety and finding directions to booking your restaurant or booking your hotel. They are specifically trained to interact with Maven customers.

We are also positioning vehicles where the demand is. Through our two services, Maven Home and Maven City, we track very closely whether these spots are the right ones. We understand where our Maven users are going and how to really tailor the services toward that. I believe that we are quite unique in elevating the whole car-sharing experience to a very different level.

Maven sits at the intersection of “traditional” automotive companies and next-generation mobility and technology firms. In your viewpoint, are traditional OEMs and suppliers ready for this transformation that is upon us?

It is happening as we speak. You kind of have to follow where the customer wants to go with that. I firmly believe that a company like GM has so many assets that are so crucial to the new space. First of all, looking traditionally at our scale, which we are able to do, we can finance the cars. We can obviously build the cars. We understand how to deal with insurance. We actually have been in the forefront of consumer marketing for over a hundred years. It comes in sort of a variety of innovation that has to happen, but the base is there, we are just doing it in a different way.

Technology is the table stakes right now. What is fascinating to me, what is happening in the industry right now in automotive, is a really big convergence of the technology that is just software and app creation with real assets. The consumers need both. They are not just consuming an app, they are consuming a service. They want something that is relevant to their lifestyle. That is why it is so important for us to take the Maven brand to be relevant to that lifestyle. We have customers who have taken Maven (vehicles) almost a hundred times in different geographical areas, so we want to be relevant. Where do they want to go? What do they want to see?

It is almost re-teaching this next generation how to interact with a vehicle in a fun way. The reality is, whether OEMs are ready for it or not, we are ready and we are very aggressively pursuing this strategy.

Major cities across the globe are competing to own next-generation mobility. Assess Detroit’s strengths and weaknesses in this competition.

I’m actually very excited about Detroit. It is clearly a story of revival and renaissance in a very young and modern way. If you look back at where Detroit has been, when you look a hundred years ago, it really was the industrial Silicon Valley. It is coming back. I actually strongly believe that it is important for Maven to ground itself in where we are, and Detroit just has this amazing energy not to give up and be really out there in trying new things. At some level, the city itself doesn’t have much to lose.

I think GM is also a bit like that. I’ve been with the company for close to five years and when I came it was the story of restructuring and survival. Now we are looking at a very different dialogue. I’m very thrilled. Frankly from a talent standpoint, our Maven team comes from all over the world. We speak 20-plus languages and between our team, we have more than 40 startups under our belts, so it is a very entrepreneurial team. Detroit has been an attractive place to come and work. We never lost a single candidate because we were in Detroit. People love the city.

The automotive industry has traditionally had a perception problem. The mobility industry offers technology to solve global issues. What can we do to change the old perceptions with millennials to attract more talent?

I think that Detroit is very much on the way there. I see the revival of some art, the revival of the food culture, and more companies that we have on the cutting edge, whether it is automotive or other industries. Real estate is dramatically changing Detroit and what has been happening; we are very linked with this. I think giving Detroit more credit is good. It needs to continue to be marketed as a destination — as a destination for travel and leisure, as a destination for new companies and new ideas. Nobody should be shy about putting a stake in the ground in that.

How important is it for the startup ecosystem to be in Detroit and around these automotive companies, and what can we do to foster that?

Personally, it has been a very fascinating experience for me to open and start a startup within a 100-year-old company. From the outside it might appear as a very daunting task. In reality, on every level of the corporation we have received tremendous support because I think it permeates not just the senior leadership team but also everybody who sees the industry that we are in the cusp of tremendous changes. People are excited to explore opportunities. In fact, most of the folks who supported our Maven startup did it not as part of their main job, but as something that they really wanted to put their fingerprint on.

I think getting the culture back, you have to move fast. You have to be able to experiment. You have to take ownership of what that looks like in a real commercial way. We at Maven are not about running experiments. We are running a new commercial business, and we are learning tremendous amounts through this and building very new capabilities for the company. I don’t know what can be more exciting. I think it is true for anybody who is going to start something new in Detroit.

What is next for Maven and General Motors?

This year our big push was to really launch a brand and get the exposure and the on the ground operation. We are very much happy with how the year went and how quickly we accomplished that. Next year we are going to be focused on growing our customer base and really deepening the relationships that we have developed throughout the country. A lot of exciting opportunities, a lot of exciting ways to grow.

What do you love most about Detroit and Michigan?

I definitely will not say the weather. I just like the attitude and the grit of the city and the energy and the vibe. I have seen that in New York, but many, many years ago when Brooklyn was hustling and bustling. Now I live downtown in Detroit and even in the past five years I have seen the amazing change in the restaurant scene and a change in who my neighbors have become; it is so cool. I just want to contribute to the growth of the city. I think anything from the art scene to the fashion scene, all of that is so honest and so raw and so sincere that you just have to be amazed in what happens next, so I’m watching.

Daniel Lai is a communications specialist and copywriter at the Detroit Regional Chamber. 

As Vehicles Become Smarter, Traditional Suppliers Ramp Up Focus on Driverless Tech

By James Amend

Automakers have a map to future  mobility, and the industry’s long roster of suppliers will play a major role in getting them there with a plethora of connected and autonomous vehicle technologies.

It is estimated that innovations from auto parts makers will account for 69 percent of value-added content in 2025, up from 30 percent in 2012. Delphi CEO Jeff Owens said his company examines the challenges confronting its customers and then composes a portfolio of solutions to choose from, either an à la carte or a system-wide option.

“We think about it in terms of what (OEMs)  need. What types of problems are they trying  to solve, and how can we be of value?” Owens said.

A view of hands-free driving from inside a vehicle using Magna International-developed technology.

A view of hands-free driving from inside a vehicle using Magna International-developed technology.

The approach led Delphi to recently acquire Ottomatika, a spinoff out of Carnegie Mellon University, to strengthen its advanced autonomous driving products. The automaker also bought Control-Tec, an expert in
telematics and cloud-hosted analytics to help OEMs find elusive quality bugs during late-stage vehicle testing.

Delphi is also working with MobilEye, an Israeli company focused on computer vision systems and mapping, on a fully autonomous technology package slated for commercialization in 2019-2020. The partnership underpins a large-scale, one-of-a-kind pilot program Delphi is conducting on the streets of Singapore.

But the United Kingdom-based supplier, which operates a sprawling R&D campus in Troy, continues to focus on more traditional customer demands, too. For example, it will begin offering a plug-and-play mild electrification option next year for an efficiency gain of up to 15 percent at a fraction of the cost of full-hybrid technology. Together with a next-generation cylinder deactivation technology under testing, fuel savings could rise to 25 percent.

Japan-based Denso, one of the world’s four largest automotive suppliers, is working on arguably the most critical element of autonomous vehicles: keeping the person behind the vehicle attentive, or “in the loop,” as its researchers say.

IAV Automotive Engineering is partnering with Microsoft and its connected highly automated driving (CHAD) vehicle to test vehicle-to-infrastructure connection.

IAV Automotive Engineering is partnering with Microsoft and its connected highly automated driving (CHAD) vehicle to test vehicle-to-infrastructure connection.

“Understanding attention is critical in  determining if the driver is in the loop. If we can sense when a driver is out of the loop, we can alert them to get back in the loop,” said Pat Bassett, vice president at Denso’s North American Engineering Center in Southfield.

Denso has established an entire laboratory dedicated to gaining a deeper understanding of driver attention levels and designing an interface that will safely disengage and reengage drivers during autonomous operation.

The company has also partnered with Detroit’s NextEnergy, a technology accelerator, to help the supplier scout out advanced mobility and smart city technologies still under development. The collaboration also will create networking, startup engagement and relationship-building opportunities with NextEnergy clients.

IAV Automotive Engineering, a Northville engineering house historically associated with engine development services, has its hands in the autonomous vehicle space through a partnership with Microsoft and its connected highly automated vehicle driving (CHAD).

CHAD combines Microsoft Azure and Windows 10 technologies for a forward thinking vehicle-to-infrastructure connection, where data can be gathered from connected vehicles, traffic-light sensors and wearable devices worn by pedestrians to enhance safety.

Andy Ridgway, president of IAV, said the technology will “pave the way for a safer, more intelligent vehicle of tomorrow.”

Other suppliers aggressively bent on filling future technology demands from automakers include American Axle & Manufacturing, BorgWarner, Brose North America, Magna International and Visteon.

A year ago, American Axle opened its Advanced Technology Development Center in Detroit. Now with more than 200 employees, the Center allows for greater synergy and collaboration in technology benchmarking, prototype development and advanced technology development in electrification and light-weighting.

“We are trying to drive mobility innovation here. We want to stay out in front of the competition and put our customers in the lead. We are deeply invested in Detroit, the mobility capital of the world. We never stopped believing that,” said Bill Smith, AAM executive director of government affairs and community relations.

Denso is dedicated to getting a deeper understanding of driver attention levels and designing an interface that will safely disengage and re-engage drivers during autonomous operation.

Denso is dedicated to getting a deeper understanding of driver attention levels and designing an interface that will safely disengage and re-engage drivers during autonomous operation.

The Brose product portfolio fulfills and anticipates current industry trends. The mechatronics specialist for doors, seats and drives continuously develops smarter and lighter versions of its solutions. Brose developed an expertise in its drives business division, supporting the electrification of drivetrain and demanding emission regulations. The company received a lot of interest when introducing its hands-free vehicle access solution since technologies related to autonomous driving require a combination of systems and sensors, as well.

BorgWarner of Auburn Hills has become a one-stop shop for automakers seeking vehicle efficiency gains. It offers a suite of advanced combustion technologies; hybrid vehicle systems spanning mild to full hybrid solutions; fully electric propulsion units; electrically operated turbochargers to boost efficiency; and all-wheel-drive systems that require less energy.

Canada-based Magna International, an industry leader in powertrains, safety systems and other big-ticket components, is developing a technology that monitors a driver’s heart rate to determine if they are becoming drowsy. The innovation, which relies on sensors embedded in the seat cushion and back rest, has not come to market yet, but is seen as an integral piece of safe autonomous driving.

Van Buren Township-based Visteon is redefining the driving experience with innovative instrument panel technologies such as SmartCore, which integrates advanced infotainment, instrument clusters, head-up displays and advanced driver assistance system domains.

The company’s dual organic light-emitting diode display technology saves automakers money by allowing them to retain existing human-machine interfaces — or the connection between the driver and the car — while adding the portable-device functionality drivers increasingly expect.

James Amend is a senior editor at WardsAuto in Southfield.