11TH ANNUAL THE GARDEN PARTY SUPPORTS PROFESSIONAL TRADE SCHOLARSHIPS

Fantastic food, fabulous cars and fine wine will be served up at the eleventh annual Garden Party, a fundraising event to provide professional trade scholarships to disadvantaged young adults. The event will be held on Sunday, June 9, 2019, from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM on the beautiful grounds of Meadow Brook Hall in Rochester, Michigan.

The Garden Party will feature fare from 30 of Michigan’s best restaurants including Big Rock Chophouse, Detroit Athletic Club, Grey Ghost, Roberts Restaurant Group, among others. New additions to this year’s event include Antihero, Hazel, Ravines & Downtown, Lady of the House, and Shewolf, to name a few. The exquisite cuisine offered during the affair will be paired with 100 of the finest wines provided by Great Lakes Wine & Spirits, classic car display and live entertainment by Detroit’s own award-winning vocalist, Tosha Owens.

“The Garden Party is pleasant, if not pleasing. It is one of the few charities that our industry, Hospitality, embraces…” said Sydney L. Ross, co-founder of The Garden Party Foundation and co-owner of Great Lakes Wine and Spirits, based in Highland Park. “We are giving the children and later young adults the opportunity to learn skills that WILL allow them to be self-sufficient and prosper – vocational training.”

Tickets for The Garden Party are $150 per person. Attire is traditional Garden Party chic. The hosts request that ladies wear hats. Guests must be 18 to attend. Tickets can be purchased by visiting www.thegardenpartymichigan.org.

2019 Sponsors include: Atlas Oil Company (along with Atlas Cares and Sam & Nada Simon Foundation), Barton Malow Company, Celani Family Vineyards, Charity Motors, Crain’s Detroit Business, Dickinson Wright PLLC, dbusiness, HOUR Detroit, Huntington Bank, JP Morgan Chase, Kelly Services, MP Tool & Engineering, News/Talk 760 WJR, Peter Basso Associates, Plum Market, Ryder, The Suburban Collection, The Tyranski & Totonchio Group – Merrill Lynch, TMP Architecture, and UHY Advisors, Inc.

Along with The Garden Party Southeast Michigan, the fourth annual Garden Party Northern Michigan will be held on September 7, 2019 from 3PM – 6PM in The Harris Gardens on North Central Michigan College’s campus in Petoskey, MI.

About Oakland Community College Professional and Skilled Trades
Oakland Community College’s mission is built on meeting community need. Essentially, what talent does Southeast Michigan need to maintain a strong economy and a great quality of life? How do we meet that need with today’s students? At OCC, this translates into the rebirth of professional and skilled trades. According to the state’s employment website, Talent Connect, there are more than 8,300 professional trades job openings across all industries in Michigan, and more than 6,200 expected to be available each year through 2022.
Today, careers in the professional trades offer high demand, highly skilled, well-paying jobs. OCC’s commitment to filling this talent gap means working with businesses, agencies and our expert faculty to meet the need for skilled, career-ready employees in Advanced Automobile Servicing, Criminal Justice, Culinary Arts, EMS, Fire Fighter Technology, Machine Tool Technology, Robotics and Welding,

About The Garden Party Foundation
The Garden Party Foundation was founded by The Ross Family and The Cooper Family. The purpose of The Garden Party is to create a pleasant Sunday afternoon that is pleasing to the eye, the palate, and for its charitable aspect – pleasing to the soul. The Garden Party Foundation’s mission is to provide trade school scholarships to underprivileged young adults. TGPF believes that the purpose of education is to teach students skills allowing them the opportunity to create their own self-sustainable life, which goes hand in hand with TGPF’s intention…to help one student at a time reach their dreams.

Walsh Offers Free Accounting Courses to Community

TROY, Mich., April 10, 2019 — Walsh is offering a free four-week basic accounting course on April 13 and 27 and May 4 and 11 from 1-4 p.m. at their location at 3838 Livernois in Troy. The Strunk Accounting Fundamentals courses are taught by Walsh accounting faculty and are open to the community. Topics include transaction analysis, debits and credits, trial balance, adjusting entries, financial statements and error analysis. A free course book will also be provided. Students should bring a calculator and pencils to class.

This complimentary course is made possible by a Walsh College Foundation endowment established by The Strunk Foundation, in memory of Arthur Strunk, who graduated from the Walsh Institute in 1957.

“This is an excellent opportunity for people starting or running a business, or anyone who needs to sharpen their basic accounting skills,” said Susan Foley, Vice President and Chief Advancement Officer at Walsh. “Walsh is proud to provide this financial education to the community and we are grateful to The Strunk Foundation for helping to make it possible.”

Space is still available and advanced registration is required. To register, contact Diane Barrantes at dbarrant@walshcollege.edu

For information about Walsh degree programs and certificates, visit www.walshcollege.edu/future-students

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ABOUT WALSH
Walsh is an all-business, private, independent, not-for-profit, fully accredited college offering undergraduate and graduate business and technology degrees, as well as certificate programs. Founded in 1922, Walsh is one of the region’s largest business schools and Michigan’s third largest graduate business school, offering classes in several locations as well as online. Our nationally ranked programs integrate theory and application to prepare graduates for successful careers. Walsh degree programs include accounting, finance, information technology, management, marketing, taxation and other fields. For more information, please visit www.walshcollege.edu.

Walsh is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (www.hlcommission.org) and the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (www.acbsp.org).

Walsh President Delivers Keynote Address at Leadership Luncheon

Walsh President & CEO Marsha Kelliher delivered the keynote address at the Lebanese American Chamber of Commerce’s 14th Annual Fall Civic Leadership Luncheon & Global Business Economic Forum on October 31. The theme was A Tribute to Women: Profiles in Public Service as part of the C4 Series: Courage, Conviction, Confidence and Character.

President Kelliher’s address followed opening remarks by U.S. Representative Debbie Dingell and highlighted the many ways public servants improve our communities, the value of their civic duty, and the fact that everyone, from individuals to global organizations, plays a role in caring for our communities.

“It was an honor to speak to an audience of such dynamic individuals, particularly about a subject that resonates so strongly with me – honoring women in public service,” said Kelliher.

The event also highlighted The Pink Fund in honor of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

ABOUT WALSH

Walsh is an all-business, private, independent, not-for-profit, fully accredited college offering undergraduate and graduate business and technology degrees, as well as certificate programs. Founded in 1922, Walsh is one of the region’s largest business schools and Michigan’s third largest graduate business school. Walsh has locations in Troy, Novi, Clinton Township, Farmington Hills and Port Huron, as well as online. Our nationally ranked programs integrate theory and application to prepare graduates for successful careers. Walsh degree programs include accounting, finance, information technology, management, marketing, taxation and other fields. For more information, please visit www.walshcollege.edu.

Walsh is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (www.hlcommission.org) and the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (www.acbsp.org).

Walsh Leadership Awards Dinner Exceeds Fundraising Goal

TROY, Mich., October 19, 2018 —Fundraising that exceeded expectations, moving testimonials from Walsh scholarship recipients and the presentation of an inaugural award, the President’s Award for Outstanding Partner in Education, to the DeRoy Testamentary Foundation, highlighted Walsh’s 2018 Leadership Awards Dinner on October 11 at the Townsend Hotel.

Nearly 300 guests, including Senator Marty Knollenberg and Oakland County Executive, L. Brooks Patterson, attended the Leadership Awards Dinner, which was emceed by Brad Galli of WXYZ-TV. Sponsors included Presenting Sponsor Chemical Bank and Platinum Sponsor Plastipak.

Merrill Lynch kicked off scholarship fundraising with a matching gift challenge, which was met and then exceeded by another matching challenge from the DeRoy Testamentary Foundation. Chemical Financial Corporation President and CEO David Provost then spontaneously announced a gift from Chemical Financial to meet the stretch goal for the evening. In total, attendees raised more than $90,000 to fund two new full-ride scholarships and add to the Jeffery W. Barry Endowed Scholarship and the Leadership Awards Endowed Scholarship.

Other awards of the evening included Walsh Distinguished Lifetime Service honoree Richard Aginian, Walsh Trustee and Retired President & Publisher, Observer & Eccentric Newspapers; David Provost, President and CEO, Chemical Financial Corporation, for the Jeffery W. Barry Award for Educational Excellence & Community Service and Alan C. Young (MST, Walsh ’85), Founder, Managing Director & CEO, Alan C. Young & Associates, P.C., for the Walsh Distinguished Alumni Award.

A live auction included two original works created during the event by speed painter Jared Emerson. Raffle prizes included custom-designed jewelry from Astrein’s Jeweler and an overnight stay in the Presidential Suite at The Townsend Hotel. Since it began in 2000, Walsh’s Leadership Awards Dinner has raised more than $1.5 million in scholarship funds.

ABOUT WALSH

Walsh is an all-business, private, independent, not-for-profit, fully accredited college offering undergraduate and graduate business and technology degrees, as well as certificate programs. Founded in 1922, Walsh is one of the region’s largest business schools and Michigan’s third largest graduate business school. Walsh has locations in Troy, Novi, Clinton Township, Farmington Hills and Port Huron, as well as online. Our nationally ranked programs integrate theory and application to prepare graduates for successful careers. Walsh degree programs include accounting, finance, information technology, management, marketing, taxation and other fields. For more information, please visit www.walshcollege.edu.

Walsh is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (www.hlcommission.org) and the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (www.acbsp.org).

OCC Receives Highest Marks for Audit Controls

The Fiscal Year 2018 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report presented to the Oakland Community College Board of Trustees at its October board meeting found the college continued to stay on top of its bottom line. The independent auditing firm Plante Moran awarded OCC a clean audit with an “unmodified” opinion.

In essence, OCC maintained its strong internal controls, with no material weaknesses according to Dana Coomes, CPA and partner at Plante Moran, the college received the best opinion possible with excellent results. She congratulated the audit committee for their preparation, involvement, hard work and tough questions.

The OCC 2018 audit committee comprises three elected trustees and four community members. They are Trustees Susan Anderson, committee chair, Royal Oak; Shirley Bryant, Farmington Hills; and Pamala Davis, Clawson; and community members Michael Carroll of Farmington Hills, Helen Kieba-Tolksdorf of Warren, Peggy Scheske of Milford and Sara Voight of Bingham Farms.

The committee helps the Board of Trustees fulfill its oversight responsibilities for financial reporting, internal controls, audits and compliance with related regulations. This includes external review of the audited financial statements as well as risk management and internal controls.

OCC receives revenue from three major sources: local property taxes, state appropriations and tuition.
According to OCC Vice Chancellor for Administrative Services Roberta Remias, while property taxes are slowly catching up to pre-recession levels, state appropriations have remained flat over the past 10 years and have not kept up with inflation or costs. Oakland Community College remains steadfast in offering quality programs while maintaining affordable tuition for the benefit of students and the community.

Since 2015, OCC has been recognized for its financial excellence through the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report program — one of only two community colleges in Michigan to employ CAFR — going beyond the minimum requirements of financial reporting and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles for public entities. In tandem with the annual award, Plante Moran also has recognized the college and prior board audit committees for their excellence in fiscal oversight.

About OCC
With five campuses in Oakland County, OCC is Michigan’s No. 1 transfer institution, offering nearly 100 degrees and certificates. The College empowers academic and developmental experiences, allowing students to reach their potential and enhance their communities. More than 1 million students have enrolled in the college since it opened in 1965. A seven-person Board of Trustees governs OCC. Board members are elected on a non-partisan, at-large basis, serve as volunteers and are not paid.Learn more at oaklandcc.edu.

Empower Yourself—and Your Future—at OCC Open House

It has never been easier for prospective students, their family members and the community to learn how an education from Oakland Community College can empower the future. Call it OCC 101—a one-stop shopping opportunity.

OCC’s Open House will be Saturday, Oct. 6, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the college’s Auburn Hills campus. Attend workshops, live presentations and demonstrations designed to help prospective students make their decision to choose OCC. Besides an opportunity to learn, the open house is an opportunity to vist the campus for tours and information.

Presentations will include:

  • Parent workshop: Preparing your student for college
  • Student panel: Witness excellence in person
  • Financial aid workshop
  • Academic information tables with faculty and staff including:
    o Art
    o Criminal justice
    o Culinary
    o Diagnostic medical sonography
    o EMS
    o Graphic design
    o Health professions
    o Library technician program
    o Nursing
    o Respiratory therapy
  • Student Services representatives from counseling, financial aid, global education and workforce development
  • Plus, information about transferring your OCC education with representatives from Eastern Michigan University, Northwood University, Oakland University, Walsh College and Wayne State University

To register for the OCC open house, visit oaklandcc.edu/admissions


About OCC
With five campuses in Oakland County, OCC is Michigan’s No. 1 transfer institution, offering nearly 100 degrees and certificates. The College empowers academic and developmental experiences, allowing students to reach their potential and enhance their communities. More than 1 million students have enrolled in the college since it opened in 1965. Learn more at oaklandcc.edu.

Former OCC Theatre Student Reprises Classic DIA TV Commercial During Arts, Beats and Eats Kick-Off News Conference

Former Oakland Community College student Lillian Bishop knows how to take advantage of an opportunity.

Bishop, of Ferndale, Mich., jumped on the rare opportunity to showcase her singing chops at a news conference Tuesday to kick-off the Arts, Beats and Eats festival during Labor Day Weekend in Royal Oak. She sang the iconic song in the classic Detroit Institute of Arts’ 1976 TV commercial “You Gotta Have Art” at the end of Oakland Community College Chancellor Peter Provenzano’s opening remarks, adapted* for the kickoff event. (*Lyrics provided below)

OCC is a first-time major sponsor of the festival dedicated to promoting the arts in Oakland County and beyond.

“It was an honor and pleasure to be asked to participate,” said Bishop, who is the lead singer for Chateau, one of Detroit’s top-ranked bands, and performs voiceover and promo work locally. “I love the arts, I love performing and I love supporting my college. I had a great time doing it.”

At OCC, Bishop starred in many theatre productions, including All I Need To Know I Learned In Kindergarten, Great American Trailer Park Musical, Our Town, MacBeth, and most recently in Peter And The Starcatcher.

Provenzano was tickled with the idea to empower a former student.

“We have excellent music, theatre and arts programs, facilities, faculty, students and graduates,” he said. “It was a delight to watch her belt out this legendary song to demonstrate to the world the importance of art in our community, the high caliber of excellent students who attend OCC, and pay homage to one of our outstanding partners in the DIA.”

For more information about Arts Beats and Eats, visit artsbeatsandeats.com.

For more information about OCC, visit oaklandcc.edu.


About OCC
With five campuses in Oakland County, OCC is Michigan’s number one transfer institution, offering nearly 100 excellent degrees and certificates. The College empowers academic and developmental experiences, allowing students to reach their full potential and enhance the communities they serve. More than a million students have enrolled in the College since it opened in 1965. Learn more at oaklandcc.edu.

Brooks Kushman Named One of Michigan’s Best and Brightest in Wellness

Intellectual property and technology law firm Brooks Kushman has been named one of Michigan’s Best and Brightest in Wellness for the first time.

Best and Brightest in Wellness identifies and honors organizations that excel in making their workplace, their employees and their community a healthier place to live and work through health and wellness initiatives. The winning organizations are evaluated by an assessment tool created and administered by SynBella, the leading wellness provider in the nation.

“We are proud to be recognized among the 101 Best and Brightest in Wellness,” said Mark Cantor, President of Brooks Kushman. “We believe the health and well-being of our employees and community is vital. We look forward to continuing to develop our company culture to create a healthy and positive workplace environment conducive to best serving our clients and the greater community.”

As an award recipient, Brooks Kushman will be honored at Michigan’s Best and Brightest in Wellness symposium and awards gala on October 20, 2016 at The Henry Autograph Collection Hotel in Dearborn.

The Best and Brightest in Wellness provides education, benchmarking, assessment tools and interaction among top employers throughout Michigan all year long. This encourages companies to continue to strive to improve the health of their employees and the greater community making Michigan an even better place to live and work.


About Brooks Kushman P.C.

Brooks Kushman P.C. is a leading intellectual property (IP) and technology law firm with offices across the nation, and represents clients nationally and internationally with respect to protection, enforcement and monetization of IP, including patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. The firm has more than 90 intellectual property professionals specializing in various technical disciplines, and has a reputation for providing leading IP counseling with a focus on the business objectives of their clients.

Brooks Kushman counts a number of Fortune 100 companies across a variety of industries among its clients. The firm is also recognized by leading legal publications and rankings, including Corporate Counsel magazine, U.S. News & World Report, Law360, Intellectual Asset Management, Managing Intellectual Property, World Trademark Review, and Intellectual Property Today. For more information, please visit www.BrooksKushman.com.

Chemical Bank Promotes Financial Literacy Month by Teaching Children to Save

Chemical Bank employees used their banking knowledge last month to encourage and inspire more than 8,800 students in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana to become life-long savers as part of National Financial Literacy Month and National Teach Children to Save Day.

As part of Teach Children to Save Day, Chemical Bank Representatives provided basic financial education to second graders at schools across the Midwest. In celebration of their 100th Anniversary and the 20th Anniversary of the Teach Children to Save Program, Chemical Bank also ran a contest through social media where they gave out $100 gift cards for teachers to purchase schools supplies with.

“It is a pleasure working with local elementary schools to educate and inspire students to become regular savers,” stated James Robinson, Chemical Bank’s Southeast Region President. “Our Teach Children to Save Program introduces children to the concept of saving in addition to developing skills for financial success as our employees work to improve the overall quality of life in the communities we serve.”

The classroom visits involved reading and discussing a storybook about Dollar the Silver Squirrel, Chemical Bank’s mascot. Activities following this lesson included sharing money related goals and learning how money grows with time. After the session, students were encouraged to save their money at home in a piggy bank or container and when it is full, bring it to their local Chemical Bank and deposit it into their youth savings account.

In addition to the Teach Children to Save Program, Chemical Bank actively reaches out to our youth by regularly visiting local schools, hosting student tours, participating in Junior Achievement and offering a minor savings account designed to help children learn to save. Chemical Bank’s financial literacy efforts have also led them to be recognized by the Michigan Bankers Association as Financial Literacy Award Winners. To learn more, under the About Us tab click on the Financial Literacy link at ChemicalBank.com.

Chemical Bank encourages children and their parents to visit the “For Kids” page at www.ChemicalBank.com/aboutus/for-kids to download the free Banker Jr. financial literacy mobile app. Banker Jr. teaches young children ages 2 through 12 how to set savings goals, keep track of their accounts and other money concepts via a fun and interactive learning platform!

Chemical Financial Corporation is the largest banking company headquartered and operating branch offices in Michigan. The Corporation operates through its subsidiary bank, Chemical Bank, with 249 banking offices located primarily in Michigan, northeast Ohio and northern Indiana. At March 31, 2017, the Corporation had total assets of $17.64 billion. Chemical Financial Corporation’s common stock trades on The NASDAQ Stock Market under the symbol CHFC and is one of the issuers comprising The NASDAQ Global Select Market and the S&P MidCap 400 Index. More information about the Corporation is available by visiting the investor relations section of its website at www.chemicalbank.com. Member FIDC, Equal Housing Lender.

Economic Development Experts: Detroit’s Reinvention Must Extend to Neighborhoods

With development showing no signs of slowing, engaging Detroiters in thoughtful dialogue on the city’s long-term vision and building up neighborhoods is necessary to continue Detroit’s momentum panelists said in the session, “Strengthening Detroit: Partners in Economic Development.”

Citing the recently announced plans to create more public parkland on the city’s east riverfront development, Maurice Cox, planning director for the city of Detroit, said the decision to forego building more high-end apartments and condos followed extensive conversations with the public.

“The riverfront is home to an enormous diversity of people who use it. Our thought was that we need to give the riverfront back to the people. Private development will shape it, but the people will have an impact,” Cox said.

The topic kicked off a conversation on thoughtful inclusion and shared opportunity as projects come online across the city.
Detroit City Council President Brenda Jones said she would like to see more jobs for longtime residents who weathered the city’s economic collapse.

“We need to get our young people involved in the development taking place. It’s a great opportunity for those who want to do something downtown but in the communities as well,” Jones said, calling for more apprenticeship programs.

Moddie Turay, executive vice president of real estate and financial services for the Detroit Economic Growth Corp., added that the city’s economic progress must go beyond downtown and Midtown to truly be considered a renaissance.

32394390513_e732d2e104_o“There’s a lot that’s happening here. We’re just not there yet,” Turay said. “We have another five or so years to go.”

Cox said leaders should consider development taking place downtown as a “both and” scenario, suggesting that catalytic projects such as The District Detroit and the riverfront can be leveraged to positively impact downtown and the neighborhoods.

“The soul of this city is its neighborhoods. The heart of a city inadvertently always happens at its core and grows out. The challenge is a lot of American cities forget about the soul and forget about the neighborhoods.”


MORE: Read more about the innovative work that is being done to ensure Detroit’s comeback continues. 


That is not the case in the Motor City, Cox said, pointing to development taking place at anchor institutions like University of Detroit Mercy and Marygrove College that is helping create full-scale neighborhood recovery north of Six Mile Road.

In answering a question on the importance of talent, Justin Robinson, vice president of business attraction for the Detroit Regional Chamber, said it is the No. 1 asset investors from other states and countries look for when deciding to relocate.

“The availability, volume and quality of talent is a key part in attracting business. To do that, you have to have the neighborhoods that talent wants to live in,” he said. “When we have that, we’ll see the economic development flow in as a result.”

“There’s tremendous progress being made in Southeast Michigan and it’s important to understand that companies are looking at the labor of not just one community; they are looking at an entire region. We need to be better at communicating how Detroit and the region are collaborating around creating that workforce,” Robinson added.

Panelists also acknowledged that the business climate, including taxes and regulation, still is not as attractive as it could be, with Cox and Jones addressing the impact of the community benefits agreement (CBA) ordinance Detroiters passed in November of last year.

Still, Cox said: “We need to give it time to play out.”

Read more from the 2017 Detroit Policy Conference:

Christopher Ilitch: Teamwork, Collaboration Will Guide Detroit’s Bright Future