Butzel Long attorneys named to Crain’s Detroit Business’ ‘Notable Women in IT/Tech in Michigan’

Butzel Long attorneys Jennifer Dukarski and Angela Emmerling Shapiro have been named to Crain’s Detroit Business’ “Notable Women in IT/Tech in Michigan.” They are among about 25 women to receive this prestigious recognition.

Jennifer Dukarski

Dukarski focuses her practice at the intersection of technology and communications with an emphasis on emerging and disruptive issues: digital media, cybersecurity, infotainment, vehicle safety and connected and autonomous cars.

In her practice, she has negotiated contracts for autonomous vehicle components, reviewed contracts involving wireless updates to in-vehicle technology, assisted companies in achieving successful Petitions for Inconsequential Noncompliance with NHTSA and has addressed multiple vehicle component recalls. Dukarski has become a national leader in legal issues facing emerging automotive technology and is the leader of Butzel Long’s connected car working group. She also has spearheaded the reporting efforts for national data breaches and focuses on the threat vectors facing automotive component design.

A self-titled “recovering engineer,” Dukarski serves as Counsel to the OESA’s Product Development Council and has spoken on First Amendment issues ranging from newsgathering in the digital age to the impact of the FBI iPhone strategy. She has been a panelist at the North American International Auto Show for the last two years, covering a broad variety of legal concerns focused on the autonomous and connected car and most recently addressed the emerging regulatory scheme as a speaker and panelist at the Center for Automotive Research’s prestigious Management Briefing Seminar in Traverse City.

Prior to joining Butzel, she gained automotive manufacturing and design experience as a result of high-level quality management and engineering positions. She has worked extensively on successful automotive product launches, managing vendors and Tier One manufacturing facilities. A Six Sigma Master Black Belt, Dukarski applies her experience to create innovative approaches to the protection of IP assets and disruptive technology.
Notably, Dukarski has attained the distinction of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Senior member status, the highest grade for which IEEE members can apply.
Further, she was named a “2016 Honoree for Michigan Women in the Law” by Michigan Lawyers Weekly. She also is among Michigan Super Lawyers “Rising Stars” and DBusiness “Top Lawyers.” She is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). She is the IEEE Southeastern Michigan Vehicle Technology Society Treasurer and serves as a Working Group member with IEEE PAR 1912 (Privacy and Security Architecture for Consumer Wireless Devices) which is focused on setting standards for privacy and security protocols and IEEE P7011 which is focused on the trustworthiness of news sources. She also coaches and mentors’ women engineers.

At the same time, she is a co-Chair of the Women in Communication Law committee of the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Forum on Communications Law and serves on the Forum’s Governing Committee. Dukarski is an adjunct professor at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law teaching “The Law of Emerging Mobility Technology.”

Angela Emmerling Shapiro

Shapiro is a litigation attorney with a focus on electronic discovery. She helps clients overcome the technological and legal challenges presented during civil litigation and governmental investigations where large volumes of potential evidence have been electronically created and stored.

Electronic discovery is a constantly-evolving field and companies face serious legal consequences when evidence is not adequately preserved or when preserved data is not defensibly collected and reviewed during the litigation discovery process. Shapiro works with clients to meet these challenges efficiently and cost effectively. She also works with multi-national clients to navigate complex data privacy laws that impact the preservation, collection and use of electronic evidence during U.S. litigation.

Shapiro was one of the first attorneys in the state to develop a deep practice in the area of electronic discovery. She is an advocate for using technology, including predictive analytics and artificial intelligence where appropriate, to efficiently and effectively assess Terabytes of data and to find the key records necessary for successful legal advocacy.

Notably, Shapiro has achieved the Certified Electronic Discovery Specialist certification. CEDS certification is earned by individuals who pass a comprehensive four-hour examination that provides a tough and objective measure of an individual’s mastery of all aspects of electronic discovery.

In addition to achieving her CEDS certification, Shapiro has been named a DBusiness Magazine “Top Lawyer” in the Information Management and eDiscovery category repeatedly since the category was first introduced in 2014. In 2018 she was also named a “Top Lawyer” in the Information Technology Law category.

Shapiro is actively involved with local politics in her community and has served on the boards of two community theaters. She serves as the chair of Butzel Long’s Women’s Leadership Committee and in that role has organized multiple fundraisers for Gleaners Community Food Bank, including a “PBJ & Wine” event that benefited Gleaners’ Hunger Free Summer Program.

Shapiro was a proud recipient of the 2015 Michigan Defense Trial Counsel (MDTC) “Volunteer of the Year Award” and just completed her final term as an MDTC board member. She is a member of the national and Detroit chapters of the Academy of Certified E-Discovery Specialists (ACEDS) and serves on the Technology Committee for the Federal Bar Association in the Eastern District of Michigan. She is a member of the State Bar of Michigan, the American Bar Association, the Oakland County Bar Association, and the Federal Bar Association and is admitted to practice in all Michigan state and federal courts, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, and the Supreme Court of the United States of America.


About Butzel Long

Butzel Long is one of the leading law firms in Michigan and the United States. It was founded in Detroit in 1854 and has provided trusted client service for more than 160 years. Butzel’s full-service law offices are located in Detroit, Bloomfield Hills, Lansing and Ann Arbor, Mich.; New York, NY; and, Washington, D.C., as well as alliance offices in Beijing, Shanghai, Mexico City and Monterrey. It is an active member of Lex Mundi, a global association of 160 independent law firms. Learn more by visiting www.butzel.com or follow Butzel Long on Twitter: https://twitter.com/butzel_long

Butzel Long attorney Jennifer Dukarski will discuss biometric data during Autonomous Vehicle Safety Regulation World Congress

Jennifer Dukarski, Butzel Long attorney, shareholder and leader of the firm’s connected car working group, will be a featured speaker during the Autonomous Vehicle Safety Regulation World Congress from October 23-25, 2018 at The Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi.

She will participate in the Product Liability session (October 23, 2018) on the “Litigating Automated Vehicle Product Liability Cases: Tackling the Tough Issues” panel discussion and will be a keynote speaker at the Privacy and Cybersecurity session (October 24, 2018). The title of her keynote is, “Protecting Data Privacy including Bioprivacy) and the Liabilities if You Don’t.” Dukarski says that designing for various levels of autonomy and user experiences has led to an explosion of biometric data collection. Designing these technologies implicates a new moving target: bioprivacy. She will emphasize the importance for engineers and designers to take note of these trends to incorporate the proper protections mandated by law that will result in leaving a privacy-oriented fingerprint on the design.

Dukarski focuses her practice at the intersection of technology and communications with an emphasis on emerging and disruptive issues: digital media, cybersecurity, infotainment, vehicle safety and connected and autonomous cars.

In her practice, she has negotiated contracts for autonomous vehicle components, reviewed contracts involving wireless updates to in-vehicle technology, assisted companies in achieving successful Petitions for Inconsequential Noncompliance with NHTSA and has addressed multiple vehicle component recalls. Dukarski has become a national leader in legal issues facing emerging automotive technology and is the leader of Butzel Long’s connected car working group. She also has spearheaded the reporting efforts for two national data breaches and focuses on the threat vectors facing automotive component design.

A self-titled “recovering engineer,” Dukarski serves as Counsel to the OESA’s Product Development Council and has spoken on First Amendment issues ranging from newsgathering in the digital age to the impact of the FBI iPhone strategy. She has been a panelist at the North American International Auto Show for the last two years, covering a broad variety of legal concerns focused on the autonomous and connected car. She has appeared on several television programs, including Autoline and AutoBeat, and in many print interviews (including CIO Magazine, PC World, Bridge Magazine, Computer World and Automotive News) discussing automotive technology and its related legal issues.

Prior to joining Butzel, she gained automotive manufacturing and design experience as a result of high-level quality management and engineering positions. She has worked extensively on successful automotive product launches, managing vendors and Tier One manufacturing facilities. A Six Sigma Master Black Belt, she applies her experience to create innovative approaches to the protection of IP assets and disruptive technology.

Dukarski has experience with field recalls and was a representative to the University of Michigan’s CIREN (Crash Injury Research & Engineering Network) and UMPIRE (University of Michigan Program for Injury Research and Education). Working as a design engineer, she received multiple Record of Invention Awards for contributions to patents and trade secrets.

Notably, Dukarski has attained the distinction of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Senior member status, the highest grade for which IEEE members can apply.

Further, she was named a “2016 Honoree for Michigan Women in the Law” by Michigan Lawyers Weekly. She also is among Michigan Super Lawyers “Rising Stars” and DBusiness “Top Lawyers.” She is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). She is the IEEE Southeastern Michigan Vehicle Technology Society Treasurer and serves as a Working Group member with IEEE PAR 1912 (Privacy and Security Architecture for Consumer Wireless Devices) which is focused on setting standards for privacy and security protocols. She also coaches and mentors’ women engineers.

At the same time, she is a co-Chair of the Women in Communication Law committee of the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Forum on Communications Law and serves on the Forum’s Governing Committee. Moreover, Dukarski is an adjunct professor in the Paralegal Program, teaching Intellectual Property at Baker College.

She is a graduate of the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law (J.D., magna cum laude, 2010). She’s also a graduate of the University of Detroit Mercy College of Engineering and Science, (B.S., Mechanical Engineering, summa cum laude, 1996).


About Butzel Long
Butzel Long is one of the leading law firms in Michigan and the United States. It was founded in Detroit in 1854 and has provided trusted client service for more than 160 years. Butzel’s full-service law offices are located in Detroit, Bloomfield Hills, Lansing and Ann Arbor, Mich.; New York, NY; and, Washington, D.C., as well as alliance offices in Beijing and Shanghai. It is an active member of Lex Mundi, a global association of 160 independent law firms. Learn more by visiting www.butzel.com or follow Butzel Long on Twitter: https://twitter.com/butzel_long

Butzel Long attorney Jennifer Dukarski appointed Co-Chair of the Women in Communication Law Committee in the ABA Forum on Communication Law

Butzel Long attorney Jennifer Dukarski has been appointed Co-Chair of the Women in Communication Law Committee in the American Bar Association (ABA) Forum on Communication Law. She will remain a member of the Governing Committee for the next three years.

Dukarski focuses her practice at the intersection of technology and communications with an emphasis on emerging and disruptive issues in
traditional and digital media, cybersecurity, infotainment, and connected and autonomous cars.

In her practice, she assists clients in traditional media issues including defamation, privacy, access, the Freedom of Information Act and Open Meetings Act issues. She has negotiated contracts for autonomous vehicle components, reviewed contracts involving wireless updates to in-vehicle technology, and has addressed multiple vehicle component recalls. Dukarski has become a national leader in legal issues facing emerging automotive technology and is the leader of Butzel Long’s connected and autonomous car working group. She also has spearheaded the reporting efforts for two national data breaches and focuses on the threat vectors facing automotive component design.

A self-titled “recovering engineer,” Dukarski serves as Counsel to the OESA’s Product Development Council and has spoken on First Amendment issues ranging from newsgathering in the digital age to the impact of the FBI iPhone strategy. She has been a panelist at the North American International Auto Show for the last two years, covering a broad variety of legal concerns focused on the autonomous and connected car. She has appeared on several television programs, including Autoline and AutoBeat, and in many print interviews (including CIO Magazine, PC World, Bridge Magazine, Computer World and Automotive News) discussing emerging technology and its related legal issues.

Prior to joining Butzel, she gained automotive manufacturing and design experience as a result of high-level quality management and engineering positions. She has worked extensively on successful automotive product launches, managing vendors and Tier One manufacturing facilities. A Six Sigma Master Black Belt, she applies her experience to create innovative approaches to the protection of IP assets and disruptive technology.

Dukarski has experience with field recalls and was a representative to the University of Michigan’s CIREN (Crash Injury Research & Engineering Network) and UMPIRE (University of Michigan Program for Injury Research and Education). Working as a design engineer, she received multiple Record of Invention Awards for contributions to patents and trade secrets.
Last year, she was named a “2016 Honoree for Michigan Women in the Law” by Michigan Lawyers Weekly. She also is among Michigan Super Lawyers “Rising Stars” and DBusiness “Top Lawyers.” She is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). She serves as a Working Group member with IEEE PAR 1912 (Privacy and Security Architecture for Consumer Wireless Devices) which is focused on setting standards for privacy and security protocols. She also coaches and mentors’ women engineers.

Moreover, Dukarski is an adjunct professor in the Paralegal Program, Intellectual Property, at Baker College.

She is a graduate of the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law (J.D., magna cum laude, 2010). She’s also a graduate of the University of Detroit Mercy College of Engineering and Science, (B.S., Mechanical Engineering, summa cum laude, 1996).


About Butzel Long

Butzel Long is one of the leading law firms in Michigan and the United States. It was founded in Detroit in 1854 and has provided trusted client service for more than 160 years. Butzel’s full-service law offices are located in Detroit, Bloomfield Hills, Lansing and Ann Arbor, Mich.; New York, NY; and, Washington, D.C., as well as alliance offices in Beijing, Shanghai, Mexico City and Monterrey. It is an active member of Lex Mundi, a global association of 160 independent law firms. Learn more by visiting www.butzel.com or follow Butzel Long on Twitter: https://twitter.com/butzel_long

Legal Experts: Liability, Privacy and Cybersecurity Challenges Ahead for Autonomous Technology Adoption

As more automated and driverless technologies are brought to market, questions regarding liability, privacy, data management and cybersecurity could present myriad legal challenges for automakers and suppliers in the not-so-distant future. That was a key message legal experts stressed in a candid conversation on “rights and regulations” on the Automobili-D stage at the North American International Auto Show on Thursday.

Kicking off the discussion, Patrick Seyferth, partner at Bush Seyferth & Paige PLLC, cautioned that the use of loaded language, specifically promoting autonomous vehicles as “saving lives,” should be used sparingly. Citing examples like the death of a Tesla autopilot driver, Seyferth said there is a common misperception that autonomous vehicles will totally eliminate human error and reduce accidents from texting, drunkenness, and other forms of distracted driving. In reality, according to Seyferth, automated vehicles shift human error from the driving to the programming and design.

“I’m not suggesting that autonomous technology is bad, I just think we need to pay a little more attention to what safety advocates are saying,” he said.

Tom Manganello, partner at Warner Norcross & Judd, disagreed with Seyferth’s analysis of safety, stating autonomous tech will be a key catalyst to improving safety on roadways across the world.

“Fatalities have gone up 6,000 per year at a time when cars are the safest they’ve ever been from a passive protection standpoint. So what’s the problem? The problem is people. Will automated vehicle technology prevent all deaths? No. What we will see is a rapid reduction in serious injuries and deaths the more the driver can be taken out of the system,” he said.

Discussion also focused on cybersecurity risk and data protection.

“When you think connectivity, you have to look at your vulnerabilities,” said Jennifer Dukarski, attorney with Butzel Long. “Imagine a nefarious person being able to hack a fleet of police vehicles to learn their exact location.”

Despite the challenges, Dukarski said Michigan is well-positioned to lead in the testing and development of connected and autonomous vehicles with the passage of the Safe Autonomous Vehicles (SAVE) Act.

The panel was moderated by Glenn Stevens, executive director of MICHauto.