Debt Forgiveness Programs Coming To Three Major Colleges In Metro Detroit

April 30, 2019

WWJ News Radio

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Both Wayne State University and Oakland University are willing to waive up to $1,500 off of the debt owed, while Henry Ford College will forgive up to one half of a students debt.

Detroit Regional Chamber Vice-President Greg Handel says they want to improve the region’s post-secondary attainment rate, which now stands at 40 percent.

“We wanted to being a survey of our business members in the near future,” said Handle, “to start to find out what kind practices they have in place in terms of tuition support for their employees, and encourage more companies to offer tuition supports and other kind of supports to help their employees to get degrees.”

Wayne State has used a debt forgiveness program called ‘Warrior Way Back’ which has benefitted the 100 or so students involved, leaving University President M. Roy Wilson encouraged.

“I think that once it’s up to scale, said Wilson, “that it could be thousands, maybe tens of thousands of students, could benefit.”

View the full article here

Walsh Named Gold-Level Status Veteran-Friendly School

TROY, Mich., Dec. 14, 2018 – Walsh has been recognized by the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency for its commitment to helping student veterans succeed in college.

This is the eighth consecutive year that Walsh has been named a Veteran-Friendly School and the third consecutive year that the college has received Gold-level status — the agency’s highest distinction.

“Veterans represent an important talent pool for our state,” said Dr. Michael Rinkus, Executive Vice President and Chief Academic Officer at Walsh and U.S. Army veteran. “About 7.5 percent of Michigan adults are military veterans, according to the last U.S. Census. Our goal at Walsh is to provide personal, dedicated support to veterans so they have a clear pathway from education to successful careers.”

Walsh is committed to helping veterans transition from military service to a college degree to successful career. The college waives the application fee for veterans and offers personalized assistance to help with education benefits. Walsh also has licensed professional counselors on staff to assist during the transition process.

“The hard work and sacrifice you put in for this country make you incredibly deserving of an education,” said Kyle Richardson, a 2017 Walsh accounting alumnus who served in the military. “Many veterans believe there is not enough time, they have to go back to work full-time after starting a life based on full-time military pay, or they do not know how to utilize their benefits. Walsh helps you with all these areas to ensure you are set up for success.”

While at Walsh, veterans have access to veteran-specific scholarships, extended payment due dates for GI Bill® users and personalized help with education benefits. Walsh’s Troy location also has a dedicated space for veterans.

“Walsh made me feel like I was more than just ‘another student,’ Richardson said. “Since I served four years in the military, I was older than most college students. I knew I wanted a college program that I could finish efficiently, and Walsh’s four-semester school year made this a reality.”

The Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency recognizes academic institutions of higher learning committed to supporting the needs of student veterans and dependents. The program awards Gold-level, Silver-level or Bronze-level status to institutions that offer veteran-centric services and programs.

To learn more about Walsh’s veteran services, visit www.walshcollege.edu/veterans.

About Walsh

Walsh is an all-business, private, independent, not-for-profit, fully accredited college offering undergraduate and graduate business and technology degrees, as well as certificate programs. Founded in 1922, Walsh is one of the region’s largest business schools, offering classes in several locations as well as online. Our nationally ranked programs integrate theory and application to prepare graduates for successful careers. Walsh degree programs include accounting, finance, information technology, management, marketing, taxation and other fields. For more information, please visit www.walshcollege.edu.

Walsh is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (www.hlcommission.org) and the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (www.acbsp.org).

MICPA Honors Walsh Leadership, Alumni and Students

The Michigan Association of Certified Public Accountants (MICPA) has announced the 2018 MICPA Award Winners, and many have a Walsh connection. Honorees are recognized for outstanding commitment and leadership, both to the CPA profession and their communities, and will be celebrated at the MICPA Awards Dinner on October 3.

Robert M. Johnson, BAC ’85 and MSF ’92 is the newly elected Chair of the Board. Former Walsh Finance Department Chair Leon C. LaBrecque will receive the Chair’s Service Award. Alan C. Young, MST ’85, will be recognized as the outgoing Chair of the Board and Walsh President Emerita Stephanie Bergeron will be recognized as an outgoing Board Officer. Young’s firm, Alan C. Young & Associates, P.C. will receive the Firm Appreciation Award.

Several additional Walsh alumni will also be recognized:

Bailey Altman, BAC ’11 – Outstanding Task Force, Emerging Leaders
Tony Burdick, MSA ’94 – Outgoing Task Force Chair, Educators
Joanne M. Candela, MSF ’92 – Outstanding High School Teacher
Alex J. Drost, MSF ’16 – Emerging Leader Award; Outstanding Task Force, Emerging Leaders
Paul L. Gimbutis, MAC ’08 – Outstanding Task Force – Emerging Leaders
Victoria A. Mundinger, BAC ’11 – Outstanding Task Force – Emerging Leaders
Bradley P. Perry, MAC ’14 – Outstanding Task Force – Emerging Leaders
Earl J. Poleski, MST ’86 – Outstanding CPA in Government Impact
Jonathan Satterfield, BAC ’16 – Outstanding Task Force – Emerging Leaders
Audrey M. Victor, BAC ’91 – Outgoing Task Force Chair, Federal Tax
Andrew F. Zaleski, MST ’99 – Outgoing Task Force Chair, Mergers & Acquisitions

Current Walsh BAC student Joslyn Le will also be honored as part of the Outstanding Task Force as an Emerging Leader.

“We are so proud of the accomplishments of our alumni in the field of accountancy,” said Walsh President and CEO Marsha Kelliher. “Walsh was founded on our Accountancy program and these individuals are a strong reflection of our values of excellence, integrity and collaboration. We join the MICPA in honoring all of the 2018 award winners.”

For more information about Walsh Accountancy programs, visit https://www.walshcollege.edu/bachelors-ba-degree-accountancy.

OU takes the next step in furthering higher education availability

The Oakland Post 

Laurel Kraus

November 28, 2017

As of 2015, around 60 percent of Americans had not obtained an associate’s degree or higher, according to Forbes. Oakland University has entered a full partnership with the Detroit Promise Program beginning fall of 2018 to provide Detroit students with the opportunity to combat that statistic.

“We’re trying to create a culture and an understanding in Detroit that if you graduate high school, there is a pathway for you to go on to higher education,” said Greg Handel, vice president of education on the Detroit Regional Chamber.

The Detroit Promise Program, established in 2013, is a scholarship program in which Detroit students are offered the ability to attend either two or four years of college tuition-free.

“Most of our students come from Oakland and Macomb County,” said Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost at Oakland, James Lentini. “We’d like to actually expand our opportunities for Wayne County students, and Detroit students in particular with the Detroit Promise, to be able to attend Oakland.”

For the previous two years, Oakland has participated through accepting up to five students in the program each year, but with the full partnership it will now be accepting an unlimited number.

“We are trying to increase our presence in the Detroit area,” Director of Financial Aid Cindy Hermsen said. “I think this is another step toward Oakland University expressing our interest in providing access to students throughout the entire state.”

Students who have lived in the city all four years of high school and have graduated from a Detroit school, achieved a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 and earned a minimum score of either 21 on the ACT or 1060 on the SAT, are automatically eligible for the scholarship but must register with the Detroit Chamber of Commerce.

Since Michigan Governor Rick Snyder announced the idea for such a program in 2011, the Detroit Regional Chamber has been responsible for managing it, with funding from the Michigan Education Excellence Foundation.

The Detroit Promise Program is considered a last dollar scholarship, which means that Oakland will first accept and apply all other scholarships and/or grants that a student is eligible for before utilizing the program’s scholarship to pay any remaining tuition balance.

“We build on existing sources of support so that we’re really leveraging our resources in a way that allow us to be sustainable,” Handel said.

While the Detroit Promise Program fully covers tuition costs, it does not aid in books or housing.

“We understand that there are still barriers to students being able to continue, but we’ve removed a major one,” Handel said.

Under the program, five classes have graduated from high school and moved into the community college program and two classes have moved into the four-year university program, according to Handel.

As similar scholarship offered at OU is The Wade H. McCree Scholarship Program, which holds the same academic requirements as the Detroit Promise Program, but awards full tuition to students in Detroit, Pontiac and Royal Oak who are nominated by their school districts.

 

View the original article here.

MICHauto Student Forum Offers Glimpse of Exciting, In-Demand Careers

By Daniel A. Washington 

Helping to debunk common myths about the auto and mobility industry, MICHauto, in partnership with Ford Motor Co., Oakland University and Planet M, hosted its “Opportunity Auto.Mobility” student career forum on Feb. 16 that included a keynote and networking reception for more than 70 students. The event aims to better engage prospective talent with auto industry experts and employers.

“Auto manufacturers are looking for people who will bring a fresh perspective to the table,” said Jessica Robinson, director of city solutions (Ford Smart Mobility) for Ford, during her keynote address.

Robinson shared her journey leading up to her current role at Ford that included stops at Zipcar, one of the first ride-sharing companies in Detroit, and startup accelerator Techstars.

Robinson reiterated that in today’s industry, anyone with an interest can find a niche for their skills to thrive.

“Starting my career with Zipcar helped me understand the number of opportunities the auto industry can provide,” said Robinson.  “Who would have ever thought an anthropology major would work in the auto and mobility space?”

In addition, a panel of former Oakland students who currently work in the automotive industry discussed the possibilities of international travel, positive work culture and upward career mobility that their jobs offer.

“The autonomous tech space is exploding right now and is offering a number of opportunities to those in a number of fields to work and thrive in a creative and innovative way,” said Robinson.

The panel was moderated by MICHauto’s Rob Luce and included panelists: Mike Dudek, manager of commodity purchasing for Faurecia North America Inc.; Samantha Roberts, communications co-op for Yazaki North America Inc.; Elise Smith, manager of human resources and business partner for American Axle & Manufacturing Inc.; and Cassandra Traynor, manager of human resources for Brose North America Inc.

Following the presentations, students discussed employment opportunities with 16 auto-related companies at the networking reception. Companies in attendance represented a number of counties across the region showcasing the diversity and vibrancy of the industry.

Daniel A. Washington is a marketing and communications coordinator at the Detroit Regional Chamber.

Michigan Coalition for High Student Standards Testimony

This week, the Detroit Regional Chamber joined the Michigan Coalition for High Student Standards in support of maintaining rigorous career- and college-ready standards in order for Michigan to remain competitive in the 21st century. The Chamber’s government relations team testified against the passage of House Bill 4192, which would repeal and replace Common Core standards in classrooms across the state. Repealing Common Core would be detrimental to Michigan students and undo important progress made in recent years. The coalition includes statewide education and business leaders, parents, teachers, principals and military families.

Read the full testimony:

Thank you for the opportunity to testify today in opposition to House Bill 4192.

In addition to speaking to the views of each of our respective organizations, we are also testifying on behalf of the Michigan Coalition for High Student Standards. This coalition is a statewide partnership of education and business leaders, parents, teachers, principals and military families, committed to maintaining clear and rigorous academic standards for all Michigan students.

The ultimate goal of our K-12 education system is to prepare our students to succeed after high school graduation – no matter what their future holds. We oppose House Bill 4192 because it would be detrimental to Michigan students and undo important progress that we have made in recent years.

Our opposition comes down the three main factors. First, rigorous career- and college-ready academic standards are important for student success. Second, changing academic expectations for students and teachers now would undo recent progress. Finally, students and educators need certainty and consistency – not further change.

Career- and College Ready Academic Standards are important for student success.

Michigan moved to our current academic standards after recognizing that too many of our students did not have the skills and knowledge to succeed after high school. Far too many students graduate, but were unprepared to enter the workforce or begin credit-bearing coursework in training and degree programs.

Our current academic standards were designed to build seamlessly from kindergarten to 12th grade, preparing students to succeed in the next grade, and eventually in career, college and life. Unlike prior standards, they focus on real-world skills like critical thinking, problem solving and deep comprehension, rather than simple memorization.

Changing standards now would undo recent progress.

The shift from our old standards to our current standards was not easy and did not happen overnight. Our teachers have been asked to teach at much higher levels, and our student have had to learn at higher levels. Countless hours have been spent by teachers and districts preparing for this shift, implementing higher standards and developing standards-aligned curriculum.

All of this effort has paid off as students are graduating better prepared to succeed in their path after high school. Over the next several years, we expect this progress to accelerate.

Students and educators need certainty and consistency.

Finally, over the past several years, there has been tremendous change within Michigan education, including the challenging work of implementing much more rigorous academic standards. While these changes have been difficult for our school and teachers, they have been absolutely necessary for preparing our students to succeed in the next grade, and eventually in careers, college and life.

Michigan educators and students have stepped up to this challenge and we are beginning to see these efforts pay off. Now, students and educators need consistency and time to meet – and exceed – our higher expectations.

Unfortunately, this legislation would stall the progress that has been made over the past several years and add volatility and uncertainty for our students, educators and families. As a result, we are strongly opposed to this legislation.

Our broad and diverse coalition recognizes the importance of having clear and rigorous academic standards that help students build toward future success. We are making important progress and need to continue doing so. For the reasons discussed today, we are opposed to House Bill 4192.

Thank you for your time.

Michigan Coalition for High Student Standards

 

For more information, please contact Lindsay Case Palsrok at lcase@detroitchamber.com.