Eastern Michigan University 2018 Internship Fair

The 2018 Internship Fair is an opportunity for EMU freshmen through graduate students and alumni from a variety of majors to speak with employers offering internships for the current semester, summer, or later semesters. The event will be on Thursday, Feb. 1, 2018 from 1 pm – 4 pm in the Student Center Ballroom on EMU’s main campus in Ypsilanti, MI.

Employer registration and sponsorship information can be found on Handshake at https://app.joinhandshake.com/career_fairs/3979/employer_preview.

Please contact Mary Jane Fallot at mfallot@emich.edu or 734-487-5621 for more information.

5 Reasons Why You Should Hire a Digital Marketing Intern

By Lucia Seprino
Oakland University

If you or your Digital Marketing company hasn’t hired your first intern yet, there is no better time than NOW. It might be time to ask yourself why you haven’t taken advantage of the opportunity. The increasing amount of pros outweigh the cons when it comes to hosting an internship program and these are the top five reasons why you need an intern.

1. Shape Your Future Employee

It’s likely that you will be providing one of the very first experiences that your intern will have in the digital marketing field. There are two ways you could look at this scenario. You could view this as an annoyance – you have to go over the basics with them, spend extra time being a mentor, etc. But you have here a golden opportunity to shape and guide a young mind into your dream employee. Most interns are in their junior or senior year of college, with hopes to attain a position in the field after graduation. The National Association of Colleges and Employers has consistently reported that 20-25% of new hires are sourced from the employer’s own internship program.

If you look at your intern as a potential future employee, things become much simpler. Take this time to teach them how to do things correctly the first time. They will be looking to you as an industry leader. If you guide and teach them the ins and outs of the business, it will make your job easier in the long run because you will know that you taught them (almost) everything they know! Your techniques, strategies, and company values will become the backbone of their real-world education. So shape those young minds and skip the hours of going through endless resumes. You have your future employee right here!

2. Give Back to the Community

You were once in the shoes of these eager students. In a competitive job market, it’s not unusual for companies to require new hires to have experience in the field before they will even be considered for an entry level position. The only problem is this has also caused a competitive internship market. Open up your company’s doors – you have the power to create an opportunity that will give someone the skills to succeed in their career. Bonus: It serves as a great public relations technique for strengthening relationships in the local community.


MORE: Hear more about ways to improve your digital marketing strategy at the Digital Marketing Boot Camp, Feb. 15.


3. The College Student Perspective

Students are social media savvy! Always on top of the latest trends, college students will let you know what’s “in” and what’s not. Their insight can be very valuable if your target market happens to be in their age range. Not to mention, they will keep you up to date on all of the events going on campus that could be useful for promotional purposes.

4. Increase Productivity

We’ve all heard of the stereotypical intern tasks – coffee runs, paper shredding and filing. Don’t fall into the trap of forgetting about your intern and shooing them away with meaningless tasks. If you find yourself having less time to focus on your top priorities because you are so busy crossing everything off of your to-do list, have your intern help lighten the load. Students are excited to learn every aspect of the job. Sometimes we feel like we need to take on the responsibility for every task but there is nothing wrong with handing the baton over to a newbie. As long as they are trained properly, this will create less stress. Time management is extremely important, and instead of always being “busy” you need to refocus to make sure you are being productive. Use your intern as a helpful tool to make the company stronger.

5. Word of Mouth Advertising

As soon as word gets out that a digital marketing company is offering an internship program, word spreads FAST. Did I mention it’s a competitive market out there? Local colleges will soon reach out to you to offer tables at internship mixers, job fairs, and to have your employees offer seminars or be guest speakers on campus. Career service centers and related department chairs keep close tabs on local internships that are available because it is their responsibility to help students find them. Some colleges even require students to have at least one internship completed before they are able to graduate. It won’t be long before you’re one of the most sought after companies to work for by post-grads with a great reputation and relationship with several local colleges and universities.

Tip: Many universities have websites with internship listings that are only accessible to view with a student login. Reach out to college career service centers and they do the hard part for you! Send in your position description and they will be sure to spread the word and post on student pages that would otherwise be inaccessible.

Your new intern will be your biggest brand advocate. If they enjoy their time as an intern, they are going to tell everyone about it. Never underestimate the power of connections. You never know to whom your last intern is going to gush about your company. It very well may turn into your next big client. Having a new intern (or a few) cycling through each semester brings in a lot of new faces. It’s important to check in with them periodically throughout the internship to make sure they are comfortable and they are feeling fulfilled throughout their time with your company.

←Back to Digital Marketing Boot Camp

What is the difference between an unpaid internship and an unpaid employee? Nemeth Law attorney says “Use six legal criteria as a guideline”

Detroit, Mich. —March 18, 2014—The hunt is on for full or part-time employment or summer internships for Michigan college students and soon-to-be graduates. As these young adults update their resumes and seek meaningful employment, how can they determine if an opportunity deemed an unpaid internship isn’t a euphemism for an unpaid job? Employment attorney Patricia Nemeth, founder of Detroit-based employment law firm Nemeth Law, P.C. says there are legal guidelines as to what defines a legitimate internship position.

“There are six criteria outlined by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division that help clarify and determine whether an intern is truly a trainee or an employee under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA),” says Nemeth. “College students, recent college grads and employers should consider these criteria to determine if a position should be categorized as a paid position or does not require payment.”

1. The training, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to what would be given in a vocational school or academic educational instruction;
2. The training is for the benefit of the trainees;
3. The trainees do not displace regular employees, but work under their close observation;
4. The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the trainees, and on occasion the employer’s operations may actually be impeded;
5. The trainees are not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the training period;
6. The employee and the trainees understand that the trainees are not entitled to wages for the time spent in training

Nemeth says the critical determinant implicit in the criteria is the emphasis on training and not task completion.

“Short-term positions where an individual is performing the same routine tasks and producing the same outcomes as paid employees likely do not meet the criteria for an unpaid internship,” said Nemeth. “Examples include tedious and lengthy assignments spent inputting data or compiling address lists where no valuable training is taking place. Of equally important consideration in these scenarios is the employer benefits from the completion of these assigned tasks because it is work that would typically be assigned to a regular employee.”

Another distinguishing factor is unpaid internships may often qualify for college credit.

“When an internship is offered for college credit, that internship opportunity has been vetted by the college or university and determined to have educational value and a training benefit for the student and may be appropriately categorized as unpaid,” said Nemeth.

There are several professions that rarely provide unpaid internships due to the competitive nature of the fields and to avoid issues regarding job classification or wages.

“The engineering and accounting professions generally require strong academic skills and offer only formal, paid internships, even though training is the focus. These fields compete within their industries for the top students, who tend to have multiple paid employment opportunities regardless of the economy,” said Nemeth.

About Nemeth Law, P.C.
Nemeth Law specializes in employment litigation, traditional labor law and management consultation for private and public sector employers. It is the largest woman-owned law firm in Michigan to exclusively represent management in the prevention, resolution and litigation of labor and employment disputes.

Auburn Hills Announces New Management Assistant

Auburn Hills, Mich.—Feb. 4, 2014— The city of Auburn Hills announces Samantha R. Mariuz has been selected as the city’s 2014 management assistant. The management assistant position is assigned to the City Manager’s office and assists with day-to-day operations and ongoing special projects. It is a year-long, paid internship position.

“We are pleased to have Samantha join us as a management assistant,” said Tom Tanghe, Auburn Hills’ assistant city manager. “In addition to providing assistance on the many tasks handled by the City Manager’s office, Samantha will obtain meaningful work experience and gain an appreciation for the responsibilities of local government managers that she can apply to her studies.”

Samantha is pursuing a master’s degree in public administration from Wayne State University, with an anticipated graduation in 2015. She holds a bachelor’s degree in political science with a concentration in criminal justice from Oakland University, where she graduated with honors and was a member of the Pi Sigma Alpha Nu Omega Chapter Honor Society, Alpha Lambda Delta Honors Society and the Gold Key International Honour Society. Prior to joining the city of Auburn Hills, Samantha worked as an intern for Crossroads for Youth in Oxford, Mich., a non-profit organization that works to strengthen families and youth with skills and tools to become valued contributors in the community.

About Auburn Hills
Celebrating 31 years as a city in 2014, Auburn Hills is home to 21,000 residents and also serves as Michigan’s global business address, with 40 international corporations from 32 countries housed here. Auburn Hills residents enjoy the amenities of city and suburban living with parks, a revitalized downtown district and a welcoming city complex with a library and community center. Additionally, the city has five colleges and universities, the award winning Palace of Auburn Hills entertainment complex and Great Lakes Crossing Outlets, one of the state’s largest destination shopping centers, providing a variety of cultural, social and educational opportunities to residents, workers and visitors. Learn more at www.auburnhills.org.

The Difference between an Unpaid Internship and an Unpaid Employee? Employment Attorney Says “The Law Attempts to Clarify Both”

Detroit, Mich. —April 10, 2013 — It’s that time of year again. Spring break memories are fading and the hunt for full or part-time employment or summer internships for Michigan college students and soon-to-be graduates is in full gear. As these young adults update their resumes and seek meaningful employment, how can they determine if an opportunity deemed an unpaid internship isn’t a euphemism for an unpaid job? Employment attorney Linda G. Burwell of Detroit-based employment law firm Nemeth Burwell, P.C., says there are clear cut guidelines as to what defines a legitimate internship position.

“The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division has outlined six criteria to help clarify and determine whether an intern is truly a trainee or an employee under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA),” says Burwell. “College students, recent college grads and employers can look to the following criteria to determine if a position does not require payment.”

  1. The training, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to what would be given in a vocational school or academic educational instruction;
  2. The training is for the benefit of the trainees;
  3. The trainees do not displace regular employees, but work under their close observation;
  4. The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the trainees, and on occasion the employer’s operations may actually be impeded;
  5. The trainees are not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the training period;
  6. The employee and the trainees understand that the trainees are not entitled to wages for the time spent in training

Ms. Burwell says the underlying theme among the criteria is the emphasis on training and not task completion.

“In short-term positions where an individual is performing the same routine tasks and producing the same outcomes as paid employees, the criteria is likely not being met,” explains Burwell. “Examples include hours-long data input of mundane information or compiling address lists where no valuable training is taking place. Further, the employer is benefitting from the completion of these assigned tasks – tasks that would typically be assigned to a regular employee.”

Another distinguishing factor is unpaid internships may often qualify for college credit.

“When an internship is offered for college credit, that internship opportunity has been vetted by the college or university and determined to have educational value and a training benefit for the student and may be appropriately categorized as unpaid,” offers Burwell.

There are several professions that rarely provide unpaid internships due to the competitive nature of the fields and to avoid issues regarding job classification or wages, notes Burwell.

“Professions such as engineering and accounting generally require strong academic skills and offer only formal, paid internships, even though training is the focus. These fields compete within their industries for the top students, who tend to have multiple paid employment opportunities regardless of the economy,” affirms Burwell.

About Nemeth Burwell, P.C.:

Nemeth Burwell specializes in employment litigation, traditional labor law and management consultation for private and public sector employers. It is the largest women-owned law firm in Michigan to exclusively represent management in the prevention, resolution and litigation of labor and employment disputes.
-end-