Mayor Duggan Hints at Another Term During Policy Conference in Detroit

January 30, 2020

Fox 2 Detroit

Charlie Langton

It was early on at a Detroit policy conference that Mayor Mike Duggan made a quip about any political ambitions for the future.

“You know, if the people of this city are as much behind me at the end of this year as they are right now, I would see doing this one more time,” he said.

Duggan, who was first elected in 2012 as the first white mayor of the majority-black city since 1970, has maintained strong approval ratings since his tenure began.

That bit of news was dropped at the Motor City Casino Wednesday morning, during a preview of the Mackinac Policy Conference, which is hosted every year in May.

That wasn’t all Duggan had to talk about, however. The mayor also brought up jobs and minority-owned businesses – specifically the ones over on Livernois Avenue.

“If you haven’t been to Livernois – you guys all covered Livernois when it was all dug up in mud – you outta go there this Saturday night,” he said.

In 2019, a stretch of road near 7 Mile on Livernois was completely torn up, its median was taken out and more sidewalk space was added. While businesses suffered at the time, most are hoping to see a return to success now that construction is complete.

“And I love to see the foot traffic, foot traffic to Detroit and business is very important,” said Christal Franklin, owner of CFranks.

Franklin said it was difficult to start a business due to finding funding and keeping customers engaged. But as she’ll tell anyone – she’s from Detroit.

“…because I’m a Detroiter and one thing about Detroiters, we hustle,” she said.

Franklin wasn’t the only business owner in attendance on Wednesday. Another was Moses Shepherd, of Ace Petroleum A, a national wholesale fuel distributor based out of the city’s west side.

“You got a lot of strong minorities out here having challenges with doing business with the city,” he said.

Also in attendance was Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter, who was pushing for more robust public transportation in the region.

“I think there’s almost nothing else more important that we could do as a region than to fix our transit issues,” he said.

View the original article here

Duggan Urges Participation in Census, Celebrates GM Plant

January 29, 2020

The Detroit News 

Christine Ferretti

Detroit— Mayor Mike Duggan is continuing his call for residents to step forward this spring and be counted in the 2020 Census, a response that sets the city’s long-term trajectory.

“Our representation, our funding for the next decade matters,” Duggan said. “We’re saying to everybody, ‘fill it out honestly.’ And where you sleep at night April 1, don’t be afraid to say ‘I’m a Detroiter.'”

The mayor covered the importance of the Census turnout, neighborhood revitalization and General Motor Co.’s newly announced plans for Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly during a 30-minute talk with Dennis Archer Jr. at the Detroit Regional Chamber’s Detroit Policy Conference on Wednesday at the MotorCity Casino Hotel.

Detroit is in the midst of an aggressive $1.7 million campaign to boost response rates.

In 2010, only 64% of households submitted their forms prior to the U.S. Census Bureau sending out doorknockers, the lowest of any major city.

Duggan estimated the poor response cost the city about $300 million over the last decade, and he said Wednesday that the average person who isn’t counted amounts to a loss of about $18,000 to schools and other programs.

The mayor also celebrated plans formally unveiled this week by GM for a $2.2 billion plan at Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly. The site last year had been targeted for closure but instead will become the automaker’s first fully dedicated electric vehicle assembly plant.

Duggan said Wednesday that automakers are making a big bet on the cars of the future and he urged General Motors CEO Mary Barra to do that here.

“GM absolutely believes in the future,” Duggan told Archer. “I am just really pleased with the fact that they changed course and they made the investment here.”

Duggan, a Democrat, also discussed the importance of the upcoming presidential election and said he’s “campaigning hard” for Vice President Joe Biden.

There have only been two times in the last 50 years, he said, when there was a Democrat in Lansing and Washington, D.C. That type of alignment would allow for a meaningful urban agenda.

“If we could get that alignment,” he said, “the next term as mayor could be a historic time.”

The Duggan administration also is continuing its push to create more vibrant neighborhood districts.

The mayor gave an overview of the $17 million streetscape improvements along the Avenue of Fashion. The project to widen the sidewalks, add bike lanes and improve a 1.5-mile stretch of roadway began in May and wasn’t without construction pains for businesses.

“We put $17 million into that streetscape … this is the kind of city we’re trying to build,” he said.

View the original article here

Mayor Duggan: Detroit Depends on 2020 Census and Growth of Neighborhoods

Mayor Mike Duggan stopped by the 2020 Detroit Policy Conference for a conversation with Conference Chair and CEO of Ignition Media Group Dennis W. Archer Jr. before heading to Lansing to watch Gov. Gretchen Whitmer give her second annual State of the State address. Duggan talked General Motor Co.’s recent announcement, Detroit’s neighborhoods, and the 2020 census during his interview with Archer. 

The pair discussed the change in direction for General Motors with the reveal of its $2.2 billion investment in its Detroit-Hamtramck plant, to create 2,200 jobs, a turnaround from its plant closings that took place last year. Duggan shared that he spoke to General Motors CEO Mary Barra on the phone during news of the closings and told her that he thought the company needed to make an investment somewhere, even with the risk involved. 

“You are going to have to make a big bet on the cars in future automated vehicles that come in,” Duggan reiterated from his phone conversation with Barra. “It’s going to be a scary, risky time for General Motors. Why wouldn’t you want it in the city of Detroit where you’ve been headquarters a hundred years?” 

Duggan said he was pleased when General Motors changed course and made the investment in the Detroit-Hamtramck plant, its first all-electric devoted plant set to build the autonomous Cruise Origin shuttle and an all-electric pickup. These technologies guarantee reduced gas emissions and accidents on the road, Duggan noted.  

Along with the influence of corporate investment in the city, Duggan also emphasized the importance of entrepreneurship in its neighborhoods, and how Detroit can better foster businesses just starting out. 

“We’ve got FCA, we’ve got Ford, we’ve got GM with billion-dollar investments in thousands of jobs, but what about the entrepreneur?” asked Duggan. “Particularly the African American entrepreneur from the city of Detroit.” 

There was once a time where the city’s neighborhoods had shopping districts that people could walk or bike to, Duggan recalled, adding that he wants to continue building vibrant commercial districts. 

“In the last 12 months 13 new businesses have opened – every one of them black owned.” 

While Detroit’s success is dependent on the health of its neighborhoods, it is also reliant on Detroiters themselves. With estimates that Detroit was undercounted in the 2010 census by around 30,000 people, ensuring an accurate count for 2020 is a top priority. Undercounting Detroit means losing money for school lunches, Medicaid, development programs, and more. 

“The minority undercount is very real, which means that our community has to have that much more effort,” Duggan added. “You need trust across the city.” 

Thank you to MotorCity Casino Hotel for sponsoring this session.

Read more about this session on Fox 2 Detroit and The Detroit News.

 

Whitmer, Duggan unveil campaign to boost interest in skilled trades

July 8, 2019

The Detroit News

Christine Ferretti

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer joined Monday with Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan to announce a new campaign aimed at helping Michigan employers fill an estimated 545,000 skilled-labor jobs opening up through 2026.

The public-private partnership, Going PRO in Michigan, is spearheaded by the Talent and Economic Development Department of Michigan, an office focused on professional skilled trade occupations and industries, officials said.

The effort, unveiled at a news conference at the Wayne County Community College’s northwest campus, will seek to dispel stigma surrounding the trades and highlight career options including welders, millwrights and electrical line workers, anesthesia and surgical technologists, web developers and industrial mechanics.

The Detroit chamber is among eight regional chambers of commerce — along with Lansing, Traverse City, Flint, Saginaw County, Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, Southwest Michigan and Grand Rapids — that support Going PRO.

The campaign is also supported by organized labor groups, including the Operating Engineers Local 324, IBEW Local 58 and the Michigan Regional Council of Carpenters and Millwrights, among others.

“While fields like healthcare and information technology weren’t historically considered a part of the professional trades, that’s no longer the case,” SEIU Heathcare Michigan President Andrea Acevedo said. “These are well-respected careers.”

Research from the state’s talent department, officials said, showed interest in professional trades varies by region, with 8% of individuals in southeast Michigan expressing interest in pursuing a training certificate.

Detroit Regional Chamber CEO Sandy Baruah said without sufficient workers with the skills employers need, businesses and regions like Detroit can’t stay competitive.

“Going PRO is a key element that we need to fix that gap,” he said.

View the full article here

Mayor Mike Duggan Proclaims Oct. 7-12 Mobility Week in Detroit

Mayor Mike Duggan has joined businesses across the city and region to celebrate Detroit’s global leadership in automotive next-generation mobility technology by issuing a proclamation that recognizes this week, Oct. 7-12, “Mobility Week” in Detroit.

Through collaborative efforts by the Detroit Regional Chamber’s MICHauto initiative, Quicken Loans Community Fund and the Michigan Economic Development Corp. and PlanetM, TechStars Mobility and Henry Ford Health System, a number of events will take place across Detroit to showcase the industry highlighting career opportunities, the cross-section between health care and mobility, and the transformational technology being developed.

“Detroit has historically been the center of the automotive universe, and now our city is leading the way into the next generation of the industry,” said Mayor Mike Duggan. “It makes perfect sense to shape the future of mobility right here in Detroit, and I’m proud to proclaim this week as Mobility Week.”

Many of the region’s assets will be on display, including Detroit’s growing startup ecosystem, technology development of the region, and the work Detroit’s Transportation and Mobility Office is engaging in the city and neighborhoods around transportation solutions.

“This proclamation calls attentions to the diverse players in mobility to celebrate our leadership in next-generation mobility,” said Glenn Stevens, executive director of MICHauto and vice president of Automotive and Mobility Initiatives for the Chamber. “We have come so far, and it is important to share and celebrate the new technology the industry offers with the public.”

Learn more about some of the Mobility Week Detroit events, including the 2018 MICHauto Summit below or visit www.mobilityweekdetroit.com.

MICHauto Summit: Explore Your Automobility Future

Oct. 10
The Beacon at One Woodward

MICHauto’s signature event engages automotive industry leaders with students and interns from regional universities, colleges and trade schools for a full day of programming. The Summit offers a unique opportunity to discuss the evolution of the automotive industry and its career pathways. Automotive and mobility industry professionals will share the career pathways with more than 160 students and interns. Conversations and topics will examine the future of the automotive, mobility and technology fields and how the industry is rapidly changing from decades past.

 

Henry Ford Health System all for you logo

The Eye, The Brain & The Auto
Oct. 7-9
MotorCity Casino

 

The 8th World Research Congress on Vision and Driving is focusing on the autonomous vehicle technology and its impact on health care. The three-day world congress will look at the way mobility technology is disrupting the way IT, big-data management and health care does business. Sessions will touch on how vision and cognition will play a key role in connected and autonomous vehicles, their development and how users interact with them. It also will highlight how the medical field can contribute and benefit from the development of driverless cars, trusts and other forms of transportation.

 

TechStars Demo Day 
Oct. 9
Detroit Film Theater

 

 

The 2018 Class of startups enrolled in the Techstars Mobility Accelerator will be center stage as they graduate from this unique mentoring program. More than a thousand investors, community members, students and representatives from the automotive and transportation industries will be in the audience to hear about new technology, autonomous advances and mobility answers from the Techstars participants. The event is the largest single-day startup and innovation event nationwide, organizers say, giving these up-and-coming entrepreneurs a venue to share their ideas and network with industry executives in real and substantial ways. Techstars with its worldwide network that focusing on helping entrepreneurs succeed offers its mobility program solely in Detroit. Its current class of 11 companies is the most diverse to date, has businesses that span a wide array of mobility solutions and comes from countries across the globe, including Hong Kong and London.

 

Detroit Moves
Oct. 10-11
Spirit Plaza

 

This free and family-friendly two-day outdoor festival brings people together with mobility companies, industry leaders and the latest in technology at Detroit’s Spirit Plaza. Now in its second year, Detroit Moves is a showcase for connected and autonomous vehicles as well as the people who make these high-tech machines, organizers say. The festival also includes art exhibits, musical performances, food and family-orientated activities such as a mobility-themed scavenger hunt. Additional activities include an educational village featuring STEM careers and area universities such as Wayne State and the Center for Creative Studies, a startup village with mobility-related startup companies and a social hour featuring food, beverage and entertainment from 5-7 p.m. on Oct. 11. Some exhibitors included May Mobility, which has an autonomous transport that takes Bedrock Detroit employees around the downtown core, as well as MoGo, Maven, Chariot, Airspace and America’s Automotive Trust.

Destination Detroit Collaborating on Major Business Attraction Effort for Amazon’s HQ2

The Detroit Regional Chamber is a key part of a broad and inclusive leadership group working under the chairmanship of Quicken Loans’ Dan Gilbert to prepare a world-class proposal for Amazon’s second headquarters.

Amazon’s search for a second headquarters has sent economic developers across North America into overdrive vying for this coveted project.

The Chamber will bring its expertise in economic development, business attraction, regional transit, talent and next-generation mobility as well as research capabilities to the coalition.

The coalition is off to a fast and strong start. Detroit has significant assets to be very competitive in this project and a first-rate team assembled. Read some of the regional coverage here.

Mayor Mike Duggan: Detroit Must Grow and Move Beyond Racially Divided History

Returning to the Mackinac Policy Conference, Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan delivered a powerful keynote about the often-forgotten truths of Detroit’s racially charged history along with ideas of how to sustain America’s great manufacturing city by learning from its past.

“We were at a crossroads in the ’50s and ’60s,” Duggan said. “Now we are at another (crossroad), during this important time in the city’s history – we must create a Detroit for all.”

Key Takeaways

  • Detroit must be one city, for all of us.
  • Detroit is not a blank canvas; we must respect those who have lived in the city and contributed to the fabric of Detroit.
  • The government owes it to the people to prevent displacement of disadvantaged residents due to private investment.
  • Development will combat economic segregation; there will be a place for people of all incomes in all areas of Detroit.
  • Blight removal is a top priority that must continue, while preserving as many salvageable structures as possible.
  • Detroit must work to build neighborhoods of density, where daily needs of citizens can be met within walking distance.

Following Duggan’s keynote address, Paul W. Smith, host of WJR NewsTalk 760 AM, joined him on stage for a one-on-one conversation. The session was sponsored by DTE Energy and aligned with the Conference pillar of increasing economic opportunity.

W.K. Kellogg Foundation Gives Promise to Detroit Youth

  • WKKF awards $3.5 million to support Detroit Promise, a tuition free path to college available to all Detroit high school graduates.
  • The grant will support attendance to 22 participating 2-year and 4-year colleges and also will pay for “Promise Path” counselors to work with students to help ensure their academic success.
  • Students have until June 30, 2017, to apply at www.DetroitPromise.com.

DETROIT — A W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) grant to Detroit Promise will support thousands of Detroit high school graduates with tuition and services as they pursue a college education over the next three years.

The $3.5 million WKKF grant is part of a collaborative effort by the State of Michigan and the City of Detroit to help ensure that Detroit youth have the opportunity to pursue a college education and prepare for 21st century careers through the Detroit Promise, a program administered by the Detroit Regional Chamber Foundation. It is part of a $30 million campaign led by the Michigan Education Excellence Foundation (MEEF), which seeks to shepherd the program through a critical time of transition and development.

The grant will support the 2-year and 4-year scholarship program to meet anticipated growth in demand. It also will support efforts to enhance retention rates so that more students successfully obtain degrees and certificates.

“I greatly appreciate the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in leading efforts to fund scholarships for the Detroit Promise,” Gov. Rick Snyder said. “This community is providing increased educational opportunities that students here didn’t have previously, which is critical for their future success and for the future of Detroit.”

Under the leadership of Snyder, MEEF has raised nearly $10 million in seed money to initiate the scholarship program, established in 2013 and formerly known as the Detroit Scholarship Fund.
The program has helped more than 2,200 students attend college; support from WKKF will ensure that the scholarship and supportive programs are fully developed and available to Detroit youth as public funding becomes available during the next couple of years under the Detroit Promise Zone, a tax capture program initiated by Mayor Mike Duggan.

“The support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation will bring Detroit Promise closer to becoming a permanent part of the city’s effort to remove barriers to opportunity for young Detroiters,” Duggan said. “This grant will help transform more young lives.”

Students have until June 30 to apply for the promise for the fall 2017 semester. Students can apply at www.DetroitPromise.com.

The WKKF grant also will support a pilot of a new cutting-edge coaching program, Detroit Promise Path. The program supports full-time counselors who work one-on-one with Detroit Promise freshmen to stay enrolled and succeed at the five participating community colleges: Wayne County Community College District, Oakland Community College, Macomb Community College, Henry Ford College and Schoolcraft College.

The Detroit Promise Path “success coaches” meet regularly with Detroit Promise students, develop a supportive community for these students and work to help them reach their academic goals. As an example, the Detroit Promise Path program, including the installation of a success coach and student wrap-around services at Henry Ford College, was piloted this year with a grant from the Applebaum Family Foundation.

Working with Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), a nationally recognized research and policy organization, the goal of the program is to significantly increase college completion and graduation for low-income Detroit college students. Created in 1974 by the Ford Foundation and a group of federal agencies, MDRC is the primary implementation and research partner for Detroit Promise Path and will coordinate program and all research-related activities for the evaluation.

“Preliminary results (which will be released in early summer) are promising,” said Colleen Sommo, the lead researcher for MDRC. “Students who received the additional services were more likely to persist into their second semester and to enroll full time in both the first and second semesters than students who received only the scholarship.”

“The W.K. Kellogg Foundation investment will assure that more Detroit youth will enter college and successfully earn post-secondary degrees,” said Sandy Baruah, President and CEO of the Detroit Regional Chamber. “Thousands of young Detroit residents will be better prepared for and able to succeed in the 21st century global economy.”

This grant also will support the results and lessons drawn from the Detroit Promise Path pilot to educators across Michigan including the 17 universities partners who have joined Detroit Promise to provide qualified Detroit graduates a tuition free path to a four-year bachelor’s degree. Many universities run similar supportive support and coaching programs for scholarship students and those who are the first in their family to attend college. Thus, the work supported by WKKF will provide a replicable model that will benefit low-income, first time college students from across Michigan and across the country.

About W.K. Kellogg Foundation

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF), founded in 1930 as an independent, private foundation by breakfast cereal pioneer, Will Keith Kellogg, is among the largest philanthropic foundations in the United States. Guided by the belief that all children should have an equal opportunity to thrive, WKKF works with communities to create conditions for vulnerable children so they can realize their full potential in school, work and life. The Kellogg Foundation is based in Battle Creek, Michigan, and works throughout the United States and internationally, as well as with sovereign tribes. Special emphasis is paid to priority places where there are high concentrations of poverty and where children face significant barriers to success. WKKF priority places in the U.S. are in Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico and New Orleans; and internationally, are in Mexico and Haiti. For more information, visit www.wkkf.org.

About the Detroit Promise

The Detroit Regional Chamber Foundation administers the Detroit Promise on behalf of the Michigan Education Excellence Foundation and the Detroit Promise Zone. The scholarship program was initially started as the Detroit Scholarship Fund in 2013 as part of the effort put forth by Governor Rick Snyder to provide Detroit high school graduates a tuition fee path to college. The program has supported the college education of over 2,200 Detroit residents. With the establishment of the Detroit Promise Zone authority in 2016, Mayor Mike Duggan has paved the way for public funding to sustain the scholarship program in future years.

About the Michigan Education Excellence Foundation

The Michigan Education Excellence Foundation (MEEF) is a nonprofit, philanthropic organization dedicated to supporting innovative education initiatives for students in Michigan. By investing in innovative, education initiatives, MEEF seeks to build an attractive workforce, foster entrepreneurship, and nurture economic growth in Detroit and the state of Michigan. The Foundation funds these educational initiatives with a focus on supporting education for Michigan students who need the support most. MEEF is currently focused on raising nearly $30 million to support the Detroit Promise program as it faces increased demand, the need for innovative coaching services, and private funding before public financing is available.

Detroit Regional Chamber’s Political Action Committee Unanimously Endorses Mayor Mike Duggan For Re-Election

Today, the Detroit Regional Chamber’s Political Action Committee (PAC) Board of Directors announced its unanimous endorsement of Mayor Mike Duggan in Detroit’s municipal election in November.

“Four years ago, the Detroit Regional Chamber felt Mike Duggan was the right leader at the right time for the city of Detroit,” said Sandy Baruah, president and CEO, Detroit Regional Chamber. “Since then, Mayor Duggan has demonstrated bold leadership and a track record of results coming out of bankruptcy. The economic impact under his guidance has been felt throughout the city, positively impacting the entire Detroit region. The Mayor has earned the opportunity to lead the city for four more years. The continued progress for all Detroiters has much to do with Mike Duggan’s continued leadership. The Chamber is proud to stand by his re-election effort.”

Grand Valley State University Partners on Detroit Promise 4-Year Program, Madonna University Also Signs On

By Daniel Lai

Grand Valley State University (GVSU) is the latest higher education institution to partner with the Detroit Promise program. Officials announced the university’s commitment during a signing ceremony last Friday, making Grand Valley the 13th public university to offer a tuition-free path to a bachelor’s degree for qualifying Detroit students.

“Grand Valley is delighted to become a full partner in a program that puts a college degree within the reach of many more students from Detroit,” GVSU president Thomas Haas said. “Grand Valley has the best graduation rate among Michigan’s regional universities, and we know that college-bound students from Detroit will find their passion and obtain a degree at our university. We’re excited about the partnership with students, the Chamber and the city.”

The Detroit Promise picks up on the work that began with the Detroit Regional Chamber’s Detroit Scholarship Fund initiative, Gov. Rick Snyder and the Michigan Education Excellence Foundation (MEEF), by providing a dedicated funding source to guarantee students in Detroit will be able to attend college tuition-free, no matter their economic status. It is funded through a combination of private fundraising through the MEEF and the Detroit Promise Zone, a program created by the state Legislature that allows for the capture of a portion of property tax revenue generated in the city.

“This partnership is an unprecedented opportunity for the city of Detroit,” said Chamber president and CEO Sandy Baruah. “We are honored to have Grand Valley on board, participating in this true partnership among the state, the city and our university and philanthropic communities.”

Citing the long-term economic impact of retaining local talent, Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan called the Detroit Promise, “one of the most important” initiatives for the city.

There are more than 260 students currently enrolled at a four-year university.

In addition to GVSU, Madonna University also signed a partner commitment with the Detroit Promise.

“We are excited to see Madonna University join the list of participating Detroit Promise partners, offering our students another high-quality university option close to home,” said Greg Handel, vice president of education and talent for the Chamber.

For more information on the Detroit Promise, visit www.detroitchamber.com/econdev or contact Greg Handel at ghandel@detroitchamber.com.

Daniel Lai is a communications specialist and copywriter at the Detroit Regional Chamber. 


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