Walsh Receives Honor for Transfer Pathways and Student Support

TROY, Mich., March 27, 2020 — Walsh was one of three schools in Michigan and 122 institutions across the United States to be named to the 2020 Transfer Honor Roll by Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society (PTK). The award recognizes colleges and universities committed to providing the pathways, resources and support community college transfer students need to be successful.

Recipients were selected based on the Transfer Friendliness Rating determined by each school’s Transfer Profile created in PTK Connect, an online tool designed to help students find relevant school data and make informed transfer decisions. Schools with ratings in the top 25 percent are named to the Transfer Honor Roll.

PTK recognizes the academic achievement of students at associate degree-granting colleges and is made up of more than 3.5 million members and nearly 1,300 chapters in 11 nations.

Walsh has partnered with other schools for more than 50 years, first offering courses for students who had completed two years at community college or a four-year institution in 1968. Today, Walsh accepts up to 91 transfer credits and has built a reputation for providing a seamless and affordable transfer process.

“Walsh is committed to providing an efficient and supportive transfer process from community colleges and four-year institutions,” said Patti Swanson, Vice President, Chief Marketing and Enrollment Officer. “We value our transfer partner relationships and are proud to receive this recognition.”

For more information about transferring to Walsh, visit www.walshcollege.edu/transfer-college-credit

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ABOUT WALSH
Walsh is an all-business, private, independent, not-for-profit, fully accredited college offering undergraduate and graduate business and technology degrees, as well as certificate programs. Founded in 1922, Walsh is one of the region’s largest business schools and Michigan’s third largest graduate business school, offering classes in several locations as well as online. Our nationally ranked programs integrate theory and application to prepare graduates for successful careers. Walsh degree programs include accounting, finance, information technology, management, marketing, taxation and other fields. For more information, please visit www.walshcollege.edu.

Walsh is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (www.hlcommission.org) and the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (www.acbsp.org).

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

As COVID-19 continues to spread across the U.S. and cases in Michigan increase, it is important to remain calm and informed on the status and threats. Over the past week, Gov. Whitmer has declared a state of emergency, confirmed cases in Michigan have increased to 12, and state and local officials are recommending social distancing – limiting events and gatherings and closing schools. Read the latest updates for Michigan.

Preparedness, awareness, and education are key during these uncertain times to avoid panic. COVID-19 is not slowing anytime soon, but there are ways to contain the virus.

These are the top 10 things to know, sourced from The Conversation:

1. We know what it is

The first cases of AIDS were described in June 1981 and it took more than two years to identify the virus (HIV) causing the disease. With COVID-19, the first cases of severe pneumonia were reported in China on December 31, 2019, and by January 7 the virus had already been identified. The genome was available on day 10.

We already know that it is a new coronavirus from group 2B, of the same family as SARS, which we have called SARSCoV2. The disease is called COVID-19. It is thought to be related to coronavirus from bats. Genetic analyses have confirmed it has a recent natural origin (between the end of November and the beginning of December) and that, although viruses live by mutating, its mutation rate may not be very high.

2. We know how to detect the virus

Since January 13, a test to detect the virus has been available.

*Note, health professionals and officials in Michigan have access to conduct 1,300 tests. They are actively working with the CDC to obtain additional testing.

3. The situation is improving in China

The strong control and isolation measures imposed by China are paying off. For several weeks now, the number of cases diagnosed every day is decreasing. A very detailed epidemiological follow-up is being carried out in other countries; outbreaks are very specific to areas, which can allow them to be controlled more easily.

4. 80% of cases are mild

The disease causes no symptoms or is mild in 81% of cases. Of course, at 14% it can cause severe pneumonia and in 5% it can become critical or even fatal. It is still unclear what the death rate may be. But it could be lower than some estimates so far.

5. People recover

Much of the reported data relates to the increase in the number of confirmed cases and the number of deaths, but most infected people are cured. There are 13 times more cured cases than deaths, and that proportion is increasing.

Recoveries per day. Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases by Johns Hopkins CSSE

6. Symptoms appear mild in children

Only 3% of cases occur in people under 20, and mortality under 40 is only 0.2%. Symptoms are so mild in children it can go unnoticed.

7. The virus can be wiped clean

The virus can be effectively inactivated from surfaces with a solution of ethanol (62-71% alcohol), hydrogen peroxide (0.5% hydrogen peroxide) or sodium hypochlorite (0.1% bleach), in just one minute. Frequent handwashing with soap and water is the most effective way to avoid contagion.

8. Science is on it, globally

It is the age of international science cooperation. After just over a month, 164 articles could be accessed in PubMed on COVID19 or SARSCov2, as well as many others available in repositories of articles not yet reviewed. They are preliminary works on vaccines, treatments, epidemiology, genetics and phylogeny, diagnosis, clinical aspects, etc.

These articles were written by some 700 authors, distributed throughout the planet. It is cooperative science, shared and open. In 2003, with the SARS epidemic, it took more than a year to reach less than half that number of articles. In addition, most scientific journals have left their publications as open access to the subject of coronaviruses.

9. There are already vaccine prototypes

Our ability to design new vaccines is spectacular. There are already more than eight projects underway seeking a vaccine against the new coronavirus. There are groups that work on vaccination projects against similar viruses.

The vaccine group of the University of Queensland, in Australia, has announced it is already working on a prototype using the technique called “molecular clamp”, a novel technology. This is just one example that could allow vaccine production in record time. Prototypes may soon be tested on humans.

10. Antiviral trials are underway

Vaccines are preventive. Right now, the treatment of people who are already sick is important. There are already more than 80 clinical trials analyzing coronavirus treatments. These are antivirals that have been used for other infections, which are already approved and that we know are safe.

One of those that has already been tested in humans is remdesivir, a broad-spectrum antiviral still under study, which has been tested against Ebola and SARS/MERS.

Another candidate is chloroquine, an antimalarial that has also been seen to have potent antiviral activity. It is known that chloroquine blocks viral infection by increasing the pH of the endosome, which is needed for the fusion of the virus with the cell, thus inhibiting its entry. It has been demonstrated that this compound blocks the new coronavirus in vitro and it is already being used in patients with coronavirus pneumonia.

Other proposed trials are based on the use of oseltamivir (which is used against the influenza virus), interferon-1b (protein with antiviral function), antisera from people who recovered or monoclonal antibodies to neutralize the virus. New therapies have been proposed with inhibitory substances, such as baricitinibine, selected by artificial intelligence.

The 1918 flu pandemic caused more than 25 million deaths in less than 25 weeks. Could something similar happen now? Probably not; we have never been better prepared to fight a pandemic.

Content for this blog post is from The Conversation, by Catesby Holmes, global affairs editor.

The Future of Michigan’s Booming Cannabis Industry      

View the full video playlist from this event: 

Last week, the Chamber’s “The Business of Cannabis: Impact and Opportunities” showcased the potential of Michigan’s already booming cannabis industry. Speakers shed light on the future of drug testing in the workplace, economic opportunities in the industry, and workforce development through criminal record expungement. 

“It’s not just a medicine, it’s always been a business,” said Denise A. Pollicella, founder and managing partner at Cannabis Attorneys of Michigan. “It is on pace to bring in more revenue than that of the national football league.” 

Since Michigan voters moved to legalize the adult use of cannabis last year, businesses have begun to revise their hiring and management procedures when it comes to drug testing and criminal records. Eric Mahler, assistant general counsel at Meritor Inc., said the automobile components manufacturer may consider revising their policy on cannabis. 

“There’s a struggle in our company whether or not to keep the zero-tolerance policy when we need workers,” said Mahler. “Are we going to sacrifice workers that we really need?” 

For the people who served time behind bars for cannabis-related crimes, most still face the repercussions even with the legalization of adult use.  

Most people formerly incarcerated for cannabis-related crimes are not taking advantage of expungement laws, said Maurice Morton, managing partner of The Morton Law Group. This hinders their ability to obtain jobs, which is why law firms like The Morton Law Group offer expungement services for free. 

“There’s talk of automatic expungement which is what is needed,” said Morton. “It’s necessary to make it easier for them because jobs in this state are great, they’re high paying.”  

The industry’s growth is also generating new job opportunities in Michigan. One in-demand job is as a “budtender” which are salesclerks who guide buyers with their cannabis purchases, explained Allison Ireton, founder of cannabis dispensary Bloom City Club. 

“These are $20 an hour jobs that aren’t going away,” said Ireton. “They’re revitalizing retail. You can’t order this on Amazon.” 

Michigan’s Talent Shortage Requires Preparing All Types of Citizens

To ensure we are building the future workforce that the economy demands, the Detroit Regional Chamber is focused on supporting smart policy that will empower and prepare all types of Michiganders to fill the talent demand for employers across the region and state that tell us their top issue is a talent shortage.

The Chamber has advocated in the education and workforce space for decades with a focus on increasing postsecondary education attainment through policies such as increased dual enrollment and expanded, need-based financial aid, among other focuses on K-12 education.

There is a significant opportunity for the nearly 700,000 people in Detroit that have started college but “stopped out” before receiving a degree or credential to connect with the required education or training businesses need in their talent pool.

To get more of Michigan’s citizens into the workforce and continue to grow the economy, the Chamber supports:

  • Michigan Reconnect, to help connect a large portion of the adult population without degrees or certificates on a path towards continued education. This policy work is supported by the Chamber’s education and talent strategy program work that is already reengaging adult students with some or no college experience in the Detroit region to get them on a track to a degree or training certificate.
  • Going Pro in Michigan, to upskill and rescale adults who find themselves left behind in our rapidly changing economy.
  • Criminal Justice Reform, to reduce lengthy and costly sentences and provide age-appropriate rehabilitation. Currently, the Chamber is advocating for a six-bill expungement reform package is going through the Michigan House of Representatives that will open up the expungement process to many Michigan residents who struggle to find a job because of past criminal records and open up eligibility for a number of low-level offenses such as traffic offenses that are ineligible under the current expungement law.
  • Immigration Reform, to fix the broken immigration system and provide businesses with global talent that will help keep our economy competitive.

The data shows that getting our high school graduates into the right universities or skilled trade programs is not enough to produce the workforce pipeline needed to be competitive in a 21st-century economy and beyond. By engaging all kinds of populations, Michigan can meet the talent demands businesses require and be an economically competitive state.

 

Detroit Regional Chamber’s Core Principles on Auto Insurance Reform

With auto insurance debates heating up in Lansing, the Detroit Regional Chamber is highly involved in the discussions working with bipartisan legislators and the governor’s office. The Chamber membership and Board are united in the recognition that the high cost of auto insurance is a critical issue that impacts our state’s economic development, talent attraction, and citizen well-being, and must be addressed.

The Chamber is eager to support legislation that meets the following criteria:

  • Result in a statewide and quantifiable reduction in auto insurance rates.
  • Recognize that rate reduction must be even greater in urban areas. Even a 20% reduction in urban areas leaves auto insurance unaffordable for low-income residents.
  • Reduce the number of uninsured drivers through rate reduction and increased mobility options for low-income residents.
  • Maintain Michigan’s high-quality health care delivery system.
  • Reduce insurance related fraud.

Detroit Regional Chamber Reform Vision

Auto insurance is a statewide issue that demands to be addressed. While our membership does not have a consensus view regarding detailed solutions, the Chamber supports the following core principles.

  • Reform should provide additional oversight of attendant care, particularly when delivered by relatives of the injured.
  • Michigan should pursue insurance fraud at all levels through a strong fraud authority or another enforcement mechanism.
  • Any proposed regulation of reimbursement rates should consider:

– The impact on motorists requiring catastrophic care, particularly care in trauma centers.

– The ability of health care providers to provide quality care.

– The need to lower rates for drivers across geographic, socioeconomic, and other demographic factors.

– Michigan’s insurance rates are high across the state, however, drivers in urban areas are disproportionately impacted. Reviewing the factors that cause high rates should be a special focus of policymakers.

  • Uninsured drivers in high-cost areas, like the city of Detroit, are left with few alternatives to driving illegally because of the region’s lack of effective and efficient public transportation. The number of uninsured drivers is a key component of insurance costs and the region’s consistent failure to provide mobility options has exacerbated the problem.

The Chamber Board endorsed these principles in 2017. The Chamber’s Government Relations team urges that all impacted parties must be at the table and compromise equally – there is no one single aspect of this challenge that can solve this problem – or can escape reform.

Marsh & McLennan Agency Welcomes Geoff Brieden as Vice President, Health & Benefits

Troy, Michigan – February 11, 2019 – Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC (MMA) recently appointed Geoff Brieden as a vice president with the health and benefits practice in Troy, Mich. In his new position, Brieden identifies best practices and strategic solutions that optimally fit his clients’ group benefit needs.

Prior to joining MMA, Brieden owned Kane Atwood Group Services for over ten years, assisting employers with their benefits strategies. During this time, he developed a particular affinity for and understanding of the unique needs of the health care industry. Before starting his own firm, Brieden garnered thirteen years of experience with a third party administrator.

As a vice president of health & benefits with MMA, Brieden will leverage his extensive background to help employers design strategic benefits plans that meet their business management goals as well as help achieve their talent recruitment and engagement goals.

“We are honored to welcome Geoff to our team: his entrepreneurial spirit and thoughtful approach are a great addition to MMA. Geoff understands the complex and changing needs of mid-size and larger employers and takes a thorough approach to addressing those challenges,” said Rebecca A. McLaughlan, president & ceo of Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC’s Michigan Health & Benefits operations.

“I chose to join MMA because of the energy and intelligence of the people, and the resources that MMA brings to the table. I am excited for what the future holds,” added Brieden.

Brieden received his BA in Business & Economics from Kalamazoo College and an MBA in Business & Finance from Michigan State University’s Eli Broad College of Business. A competitive sailor, Brieden is also an active supporter of Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries, Wreaths Across America, and the LivLife Foundation.

If you would like more information, or to schedule an interview, please contact Ryan Bowers at (248)822-6231 or rbowers@mma-mi.com.

New Co-Chairs of Michigan’s Automotive Caucus Prioritize Future of State’s Signature Industry

DETROIT, Mich., January 15, 2019 – Today, the Michigan Legislative Automotive Caucus announced the new co-chairs for the 2019-20 legislative session as Rep. Jim Lilly (R-Park Twp), Sen. Mallory McMorrow (D-Royal Oak), Rep. Joe Tate (D-Detroit), and Sen. Wayne Schmidt (R-Traverse City).

The announcement was made as legislators attended the 2019 North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) preview week with representatives of the state’s automotive and mobility industry at a meeting convened by MICHauto, Michigan’s only automotive cluster association.

“For over a century, Michigan’s automotive industry has undoubtedly shaped the global economy along with how people engage with one another,” said Rep. Tate. “I am thrilled to be working with my esteemed co-chairs, and there is no more appropriate place for us to announce this renewed focus than at NAIAS as we celebrate the legacy and the future of this storied relationship between Detroit and the automobile.”

The incoming leadership represents a diversity of experience and geographical representation of Michigan’s automotive industry and the communities so closely tied to it.

“This issue is incredibly timely and relevant to our priorities as a legislature. Our automotive industry touches every corner of the state and reaches well beyond the assembly line and manufacturing floor in terms of jobs and economic impact,” said Sen. Schmidt. “Whether it be raw materials mined in the north and shipped on our Great Lakes, advanced manufacturing in West Michigan, or testing the latest innovation at the American Center for Mobility, a strong automotive industry means a strong Michigan.”

Founded in 2015, the Auto Caucus is dedicated to ensuring Michigan’s business climate remains competitive and supports the state’s global leadership in next-generation mobility technology and its signature industry. Since its formation, the Caucus has taken a leadership role in defining policy such as the SAVE Act legislation put in place in 2016 to establish regulations for the testing, use and the eventual sale of autonomous vehicle legislation.

“My colleagues and I are dedicated to ensuring our state addresses key challenges in terms of stakeholder engagement and infrastructure improvement,” said Sen. McMorrow. “I look forward to bringing my years of experience in and around the automotive industry to the table to ensure Michigan stays well-positioned to lead the nation in the development and deployment of electrification and connected and autonomous vehicles.”

The co-chairs will be spending the upcoming weeks educating new legislators on the caucus and solidify membership before holding their first meeting of the new legislative session, which is tentatively expected to be held in February.

“As a caucus, we look forward to announcing an ambitious schedule of education opportunities, site visits, and policy priorities for our colleagues in the legislature,” said Rep. Lilly. “We will be looking to collaborate with our partners in the automotive and energy industries as well as state and federal regulators to ensure that Michigan remains the automotive and mobility capital of the world.”

The new co-chairs succeed Sen. Steven Bieda (D-Warren), Sen. Mike Kowall (R-White Lake), Rep. Michael McCready (R-Bloomfield Hills), and Rep. Adam Zemke (D-Ann Arbor), all of whom were termed out of their respective offices at the end of the 2017-18 legislative session.

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About Michigan Legislative Automotive Caucus

The Michigan Legislative Automotive Caucus is a bi-partisan, bi-cameral group of legislators from across Michigan focused on the future success of the state’s automotive industry. The Auto Caucus is committed to ensuring Michigan provides the competitive climate to remain the global automotive capital through their support of relevant policy priorities and working in partnership with Michigan’s business, philanthropic, and regulatory communities.

About MICHauto

MICHauto, Michigan’s only automotive cluster association, is a statewide economic development initiative of the Detroit Regional Chamber. Dedicated to promoting, retaining and growing the automotive and next-generation mobility industry in Michigan, MICHauto embodies a public-private strategy, championing Michigan as the global epicenter of the automotive industry and providing a platform for collaboration on advocacy, business attraction and retention, and talent attraction. To learn more, visit MICHauto.org.

Statement on the Michigan governor’s race results:

DETROIT, Mich. Nov. 6, 2018 —

“We congratulate incoming Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and look forward to working with her administration to continue Michigan’s positive momentum.  Michigan has benefited from strong, stable and calm leadership for eight years and we are committed to continuing this positive flywheel.  The Chamber’s Political Action Committee (PAC) endorsed Whitmer and is ready to help the new governor deliver on plans for improving infrastructure, regional transit and education outcomes.”

Sandy K. Baruah, President and CEO, Detroit Regional Chamber

 

Howes: Strong economy poses risks for next governor — whoever it is

November 5, 2018

The Detroit News

By: Daniel Howes

Michigan’s next governor will inherit something the state’s last three CEOs didn’t — the strongest economy in close to 50 years.

Job creation is up, unemployment is plumbing record lows and per-capita income is rising. State tax policy is once again deemed competitive. And for the first time in decades, Detroit is on generally solid financial footing, attracting billions in private capital and fundamentally changing the narrative of America’s poorest major city.

The challenge for Gov. Rick Snyder’s successor: don’t screw it up. Whatever you think of the Republican incumbent, he used the lessons of the “Lost Decade” over the past eight years to assemble a record of disciplined financial management and pragmatic problem-solving that reassured business and often transcended the partisan divide in a hyper-partisan era.

With the notable exception of the Flint water crisis, Michigan is on sounder economic ground than any time in at least a generation. Its auto industry is restructured and, for now, profitable. Its tech sector is growing. And its metrics of performance are consistently improving instead of declining as they did in the run-up to the Great Recession.

If history is any guide — and it usually is in this state — the most likely outcome of Tuesday’s election won’t so much mean more of the same, even if Republican Bill Schuette proves the polls wrong and wins. It’ll be what Business Leaders for Michigan’s CEO, Doug Rothwell, calls the state’s “consistent inconsistency” on the priorities and policy-making that impact investment, growth and job creation.

Meaning that whenever the out-of-power party regains the governor’s office, control of the Legislature or both, Michigan’s political tradition pretty much ensures that tax, spending and economic development policies are overturned summarily, whipsawing business by rewarding friends and punishing enemies. It’s not helpful.

“The Lost Decade was not an accident,” said Patrick Anderson, CEO of the East Lansing-based Anderson Economic Group. “We lost that decade. It was a self-inflicted wound. It wasn’t just bad conditions. It was bad management.”

His counsel for whoever succeeds Snyder: first, do not undermine the dramatic improvement in Michigan’s business-tax climate, now ranked in the top 10 nationwide. Second, do not succumb to the budget brinksmanship of the Granholm years, including the occasional middle-of-the-night tax increase. And keep the momentum going on Detroit.

“Don’t fall back into the old, poisonous ways,” Anderson added. “Then we’re going to be signaling that we’re slipping back into the kind of incompetence and self-defeating activity that marred some of Michigan during the Lost Decade.”

Detroit is undergoing an unmistakable rebound. Credit the city’s Chapter 9 bankruptcy, which Snyder ordered. Credit business and political leaders in both parties who coalesced behind an agenda of reinvention. Credit private capital driving the resurgence — billions of dollars invested in the old bones of downtown and Midtown under a pragmatic mayor who understands business as well as politics.

And that’s precisely the balance Schuette or Democrat Gretchen Whitmer should emulate upon taking office. They can either build on the bipartisan economic consensus crafted by business, by philanthropy, by Snyder and Mike Duggan — two comparatively nominal partisans with a bias for focusing on what works.

Or the next governor can muck up Michigan’s mojo and alienate half the state and much of the business community by reversing reforms to reward their favorite constituencies and score ideological points, whatever the dollars-and-cents impact to Michigan’s budget and business climate.

Case in point: Whitmer and fellow Democrats running for legislative seats vow to repeal the state’s right-to-work law, to repeal the so-called “pension tax” levied on defined-benefit payouts of public-sector retirees, to reinstate the Prevailing Wage Law. And Schuette promises yet another tax cut, even as Michigan’s roads crumble and education funding mostly flatlines.

An alternative favored by some of the state’s leading business groups is to continue practicing the fiscal discipline favored by Michigan’s current CEO-turned-governor. To continue paying down long-term debt; to continue delivering balanced budgets on time and without drama; to maximize the tax base without discouraging investment.

“That positive flywheel is working,” said Sandy Baruah, CEO of the Detroit Regional Chamber. “We certainly don’t want that tinkered with.”

And continue to avoid the Trump-era polarization defining politics in too many parts of the country. Snyder eschewed such extreme partisanship, preferring to practice a “relentless positive action” that enabled big things (see the Detroit bankruptcy) considered too hard to tackle.

Michigan’s next governor should take care to avoid breaking what’s already fixed. The second half of the past 16 years proved two things: that governors don’t cause macro-economic recessions, and that undisciplined, anti-business financial management at the state level tends to make the predicament worse.

Business cycles don’t conform to electoral cycles, as Granholm could attest. Her successor’s tenure coincided with the longest year-over-year sales and profit expansion for the Detroit auto industry since the 1960s, as well as the longest national economic recovery the country has seen in decades.

Snyder’s successor may not be so fortunate. Even as it reported surprisingly strong third-quarter results, General Motors Co. last week confirmed plans to offer buyouts to 18,000 salaried employees and signaled that rising interest rates and trade uncertainty are combining to create an industry slowdown.

Ford Motor Co. is deep in a global restructuring that is expected to claim a slice of its global salaried workforce. As the Federal Reserve continues to raise rates, equity markets are telegraphing uncertainty and worries that corporate earnings mostly have nowhere to go but down.

Major challenges loom for the state. The educational attainment of its public school students is a national embarrassment, worsening as most other states improve. Repairs to its roads and transportation infrastructure are desperately needed, but the legislators in the state that put America on wheels can’t — won’t — figure out how to pay for it.

Making headway on those and other serious issues won’t be accomplished unilaterally, no matter who prevails in this election. It’ll take consensus and a lot less worrying about who gets the credit.

View the original article here

Southfield Attorney Sworn in at Supreme Court

Foster Swift attorney Stefania Gismondi was among those from the State Bar of Michigan’s Young Lawyers’ section sworn in at the U.S. Supreme Court at a small group bar admission ceremony on Wednesday, October 10 in Washington D.C.

Stefania is a member of the firm’s General Litigation practice group and practices in the Southfield office. She has experience working with small business enterprises and non-profits.