Kyyba Xcelerator, Bodman PLC and TiE Detroit to host Pitch Club Nov. 29th at SPARK Ann Arbor

Kyyba Xcelerator, Bodman PLC and TiE Detroit are hosting Pitch Club on Wednesday, November 29th at SPARK Ann Arbor. Pitch Club is a mentoring and funding program aimed at connecting the various ecosystems and smart zones throughout Michigan. Pitch Club has ongoing monthly events that provide entrepreneurs the opportunity to learn from seasoned entrepreneurs and investors. The events are meant to educate, network, inspire and provide valuable experiences for being investable. As part of the events, 3 lucky entrepreneurs will receive the opportunity to practice their pitch and discuss business plan with funding experts, giving them a better understanding the mindset of an investor. Events are hosted monthly on Wednesday evenings in Michigan cities including: Ann Arbor, Detroit, Lansing and Grand Rapids.

The November 29th event at SPARK Ann Arbor will include 3 startup presentations, a pool of judges, and a special guest “Founder & CEO” keynote speaker. The application deadline for startups is Sunday November 12, 2017. Apply here: http://kyybaxcelerator.com/pitch-club-application.php

Keynote Speaker
Paul Glantz, Founder and Chairman of Emagine Entertainment, Inc. and CEO of Proctor Financial Inc.

Judges
Robi Mitra, CEO, K&A Resource Group
Steve Jbara , Owner, Grand Rapids Drive
Tember Shea, Director inGAGE, Inforum
Patrick Falle, Global Chief Evangelist/Founding Investor, Avalara
Sridhar Lakshmanan, Educator, Entrepreneur, Mentor, University of Michigan, Dearborn
David C. Bloom, Founder and Principal, Factotem

Agenda
5:10pm – 5:25pm Registration
5:25pm – 5:30 pm Opening Remarks
5:30pm-6:30pm Company Presentations
6:30pm-6:35pm – 2 minute break, and introduction of Keynote
6:35pm-6:55pm –Keynote, Paul Glantz, Founder & Chairman of Emagine Entertainment, Inc. & CEO, Proctor Financial Inc
6:55pm – 7:10 pm – Q&A with Audience
7:10 pm – 7:30 pm Networking

Thank you to our sponsors
Rehmann
Bondman PLC
TiE Detroit
Ann Arbor SPARK

Check out the entire calendar and get registerd here: http://kyybaxcelerator.com/calendar-registration.php

The select pool of the companies chosen to pitch at the monthly Pitch Club events will be provided investment opportunities in the form of presenting to the investment team of Kyyba Xcelerator and TiE Detroit Angels during their quarterly Angels meeting. Investment opportunities will range from $25,000 to $100,000. TiE Detroit Angels funded companies, if qualifications are met, also could have the chance to present to the TiE Global Angel Alliance (TGAA). TGAA is a global platform for funding that exposes startups to a broader investment pool and opportunities to raise additional funds much larger than any single TiE Chapter or local Angel Group. TGAA recently invested $395,000 in Zeto, and $450,000 for Hemex Health from the TiE Global network.
Testimonials

“Pitch Club provides a tremendous opportunity for cross-pollination and increased deal flow across Michigan, something that currently is not at the level it should be. This program will be very valuable for both the startup entrepreneurs and investors and will hopefully create a meaningful dialogue, as well as a technological and economic impact for the entire region,” said Tel Ganesan, Managing Director, Kyyba Xcelerator. “In order to make this initiative even more successful, I encourage seasoned entrepreneurs in each of these areas to join us by serving as a mentor.”

“From the elevator pitch to the public pitch to the investor pitch, the more successful entrepreneurs are pitching, the more integral this will become to their success. We are pleased to partner with Kyyba Xcelerator to help entrepreneurs to gain exposure, insights and support that will help them truly move the needle,” said Paul Riser, Director of Technology-Based Entrepreneurship at TechTown Detroit.
“Access to investors and the opportunities to pitch without having to travel are signs of a healthy startup ecosystem,” said Paul Krutko, president and CEO of Ann Arbor SPARK. “We are excited to have the Ann Arbor region included in Pitch Club; this new avenue for connecting startups and potential funders is a terrific addition to the existing ways entrepreneurs are able to attract capital as well as the investors already interested in what’s happening here.”
About Kyyba Xcelerator (KX):
Kyyba Xcelerator is a global second stage startup accelerator investing in technology and IP related startups in broad based industries. KX provides a custom acceleration program and scaling services to startups, including Customer Development, Product Development and Investment in exchange for equity. Industries Include: Health, Mobility, IoT, Industrial, Energy, Automotive, BlockChain and Fintech.


About Bodman PLC:
With more than 150 attorneys in offices throughout Michigan, Bodman PLC has delivered extraordinary results to our clients for more than 85 years. Our attorneys provide savvy business counsel to some of the region’s most successful companies and individuals on a broad range of issues, and we provide clients with the personal attention of a small firm with the talent and skill expected of the nation’s leading law firms.

About TiE:
The Indus Entrepreneurs (TiE), was founded in 1992 in Silicon Valley by a group of successful entrepreneurs, corporate executives, and senior professionals with roots in the Indus region. There are currently 13,000 members, including over 2,500 charter members in 61 chapters across 18 countries. TiE’s mission is to foster entrepreneurship globally through mentoring, networking, education, incubating, and funding. Dedicated to the virtuous cycle of wealth creation and giving back to the community, TiE’s focus is on generating and nurturing our next generation of entrepreneurs.

Sarah Myrand
Kyyba Xcelerator
sarahm@kyybaxcelerator.com
248-254-4043

Pitch Club, for Entrepreneurs and Startups, Will be Hosted at Techtown in Detroit

Kyyba Xcelerator, Bodman PLC and TiE Detroit are hosting Pitch Club on Wednesday, October 18th at Techtown in Detroit. Pitch Club is a mentoring and funding program aimed at connecting the various ecosystems and smart zones throughout Michigan. Pitch Club has ongoing monthly events that provide entrepreneurs the opportunity to learn from seasoned entrepreneurs and investors. The events are meant to educate, network, inspire and provide valuable experiences for being investable. As part of the events, 3 lucky entrepreneurs will receive the opportunity to practice their pitch and discuss business plan with funding experts, giving them a better understanding the mindset of an investor. Events are hosted monthly on Wednesday evenings in Michigan cities including: Ann Arbor, Detroit, Lansing and Grand Rapids.

The October 18th event at Techtown will include 3 startup presentations, a pool of judges, and a special guest “Founder & CEO” keynote speaker. The application deadline for startups is Sunday October 1, 2017. Apply here: http://kyybaxcelerator.com/pitch-club-application.php

Keynote Speaker:
Donald Hicks, Founder, President, & CEO of LLamasoft

Judges:
Wendy Jarchow, Chief Investment Officer, River SaaS Capital
Robi Mitra, CEO, K&A Resource Group
Neil Kane, Director of Undergraduate Entrepreneurship, MSU
Patti Glaza, VP & Managing Director, Invest Detroit
Steve Jbara, Owner, Grand Rapids Drive

Agenda:
5:10pm – 5:25pm Registration
5:25pm – 5:30pm Opening Remarks
5:30pm-6:30pm Company Presentations
6:30pm-6:35pm – 2 minute restroom break, and introduction of Keynote
6:35pm-6:55pm – Keynote Speaker
6:55pm – 7:10pm – Q&A with Audience
7:10pm – 7:30pm Networking

Sponsors:
Bondoman PLC
TiE Detroit
Techtown

Check out the entire calendar and get registerd here: http://kyybaxcelerator.com/calendar-registration.php

The select pool of the companies chosen to pitch at the monthly Pitch Club events will be provided investment opportunities in the form of presenting to the investment team of Kyyba Xcelerator and TiE Detroit Angels during their quarterly Angels meeting. Investment opportunities will range from $25,000 to $100,000. TiE Detroit Angels funded companies, if qualifications are met, also could have the chance to present to the TiE Global Angel Alliance (TGAA). TGAA is a global platform for funding that exposes startups to a broader investment pool and opportunities to raise additional funds much larger than any single TiE Chapter or local Angel Group. TGAA recently invested $395,000 in Zeto, and $450,000 for Hemex Health from the TiE Global network.

 


About Bodman PLC:
With more than 150 attorneys in offices throughout Michigan, Bodman PLC has delivered extraordinary results to our clients for more than 85 years. Our attorneys provide savvy business counsel to some of the region’s most successful companies and individuals on a broad range of issues, and we provide clients with the personal attention of a small firm with the talent and skill expected of the nation’s leading law firms.
About TiE:
The Indus Entrepreneurs (TiE), was founded in 1992 in Silicon Valley by a group of successful entrepreneurs, corporate executives, and senior professionals with roots in the Indus region. There are currently 13,000 members, including over 2,500 charter members in 61 chapters across 18 countries. TiE’s mission is to foster entrepreneurship globally through mentoring, networking, education, incubating, and funding. Dedicated to the virtuous cycle of wealth creation and giving back to the community, TiE’s focus is on generating and nurturing our next generation of entrepreneurs.

Contact:

Sarah Myrand
Kyyba Xcelerator
sarahm@kyybaxcelerator.com
248-254-4043

Gord Advisors Small Business Unit Hires a New Manager

Gordon Advisors, a leading CPA and consulting firm, welcomes their new Small Business Unit Manager, Gregg Roberts to their team. Gregg will be replacing Cheryl Bida, Manager of the highly successful Small Business Unit upon her retirement.

Ms. Bida’s dedication, hard work and innovative spirit is the reason for her success and the expansion of the Small Business Unit of Gordon Advisors. Jeff Farrington, Gordon Advisors’ Chief Operating Officer says “Cheryl Bida has done a tremendous job for our small business clients over the past 20 years. She will be missed when she retires but it will provide an opportunity for Gregg Roberts, who has extensive experience with financial statement preparation, tax filings and heading a group of dedicated Accountants and Bookkeepers. We are excited to have Gregg on the Gordon Advisors Team”.

Mr. Roberts brings to the Small Business Unit 17 years of public accounting experience with a background of taxes and accounting focusing in the franchise, retail and service industries. He received his Bachelor of Arts in Business with a major in Accounting from Walsh College and went on to earn his CPA license in 2003. Mr. Roberts is excited for this opportunity to be a part of a company voted one of the 101 Best & Brightest Companies to Work for.

Ms. Bida joined Gordon Advisors in the 90’s, as a staff accountant and worked her way to become the leader of the Small Business Unit at Gordon Advisors. Ms. Bida is retiring to chase her dreams of traveling, something she has always been fond of, volunteering and most importantly grandparenting. She is pleased knowing someone as experienced and competent as Gregg will be taking over the sector she’s worked so hard to grow. Ms. Bida was a great asset to Gordon Advisors; her devotion, bubbly personality and her knowledge will be missed greatly.


Gordon Advisors, P.C. (www.gordoncpa.com) is a full-service certified public accounting and business consulting firm that maintains an office in Troy, Michigan. Ranked as the 17th largest CPA firm in Michigan, they specialize in personal and business income tax, accounting, auditing, strategic planning, business valuations, litigation support, fraud, forensic and risk services, as well as business consulting.

Clayton & McKervey shareholder explains the 5 most common mistakes small to mid-sized business make with GAAP – and how they can impact the purchase price when a company goes for sale

Kevin Johns, a shareholder in the Small and Mid-sized Entities practice at Clayton & McKervey, an international certified public accounting and business advisory firm located in metro Detroit, says his work with new small to mid-sized businesses have a common theme when it comes to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) mistakes. GAAP, the most common accounting framework for the preparation of financial statements in the U.S., provides a standard set of rules in order for readers to properly understand and interpret financial results, and serves other purposes as well.

“GAAP is also the most common framework used when composing contract language for mergers and acquisitions; errors and omissions in applying GAAP can be costly in such business transactions,” Johns said. “They can impact credibility with lenders and lead to incorrect decision-making.”

GAAP violations can also cause inaccurate reporting for internal and budgeting purposes, as well as a reduced reliance on prepared financial statements for third party readers.

“The ripple effect of damaged credibility due to GAAP errors can have an additional negative impact on the purchase price when a business is put up for sale,” Johns said.

Johns offered a list of the five most common GAAP violations that he and his Clayton McKervey colleagues routinely uncover when working with a new client.

  1. Escalating Rent
    Lessors often offer financial incentives to solicit a lessee into entering a rental contract, such as “free rent” at either the beginning or end of the lease arrangement. GAAP accounting requires that lessees divide the total rent payments over the lease term by the number of months in the lease to calculate monthly rent expense unless a more rational basis is found. Any difference between payments and expenses is classified as either a current or non-current asset or liability on the balance sheet.
  2. Depreciation
    Over the past decade, the tax code has allowed for accelerated depreciations methods and bonus depreciation. These accelerated tax methods of depreciation do not comply with GAAP reporting rules, as outlined in FASB ASC Topic 740. In addition to accelerated depreciation, structural building improvements made to leased property would normally be depreciated over 39 years for tax purposes; however, GAAP stipulates that these improvements should be depreciated over the shorter of their useful life or the lease term, including renewable options that are expected to be exercised. It is common for businesses to incorrectly default to using the tax method of 39 years of depreciation for GAAP reporting for leasehold improvements.
  3. Capitalization of Overhead Costs
    Many times only direct costs, such as labor and raw materials, are used to value the production of inventory, and overhead is typically either not associated or applied incorrectly to the basis of the value of inventory. By not applying overhead calculations, large inventory valuation errors can occur on the balance sheet, and with related cost of goods sold on the income statement.
  4. Accrued Vacation/PTO
    Vacation or Paid-Time-Off (PTO) policies often incorporate a “use it or lose it” rule whereby employees lose the unused portion of their vacation. However, there are many companies that will pay cash for unused vacation time. A formal plan in a human resource handbook does not by itself dictate a potential employer liability. Instead, a verbal and accepted policy is enough to trigger an employee’s potential right to compensation of vacation or PTO that has not yet been accrued. Depending on the length of employee tenure and vacation/PTO time awarded, the liability associated with these policies can be significant. The impact is even more pronounced when a business is for sale and the buyer factors this liability into the required working capital target, as well as the computing enterprise value, as a multiple of earnings.
  5. Uncertain Tax Positions
    FASB ASC Topic 740 established a threshold condition where a tax position taken in a previously filed tax return, or to be taken on future tax returns, be recognized currently in the financial statements. Uncertain tax positions must be recognized under a two-step process:
  • A “more likely than not” (more than 50%) approach that a tax position will be sustained under an IRS audit.
  • The tax position is measured at the largest amount of tax benefit/expense that is greater than 50% likely.

The ability and ease to reach new markets outside of the businesses state of residence continues to propel businesses into new markets. Depending upon the nature and duration of the activity conducted outside of their home state, businesses could face an income tax liability in these states. If the company does not register to do business and does not register to file tax returns in these states, they would not preclude the GAAP financial statements from accruing the tax liability and disclosing it on the financial statements.
To read about additional common tax uncertainties that need analysis, as well as the Framework for Small and Medium Sized Entities (FRF for SMEs) as a potential non-GAAP reporting option, visit the Clayton & McKervey website.

About Clayton & McKervey
Clayton & McKervey is a full-service CPA firm helping middle-market entrepreneurial companies compete in the global marketplace. The firm is headquartered in metro Detroit and services clients throughout the world. To learn more, visit claytonmckervey.com.

15 years in the making, new revenue recognition standard has CPA firm coaching clients for change as 2018 and 2019 deadlines are phased in

Approximately 15 years ago, the accounting industry vocalized the need to form a single, unified global revenue recognition strategy. Fast forward to the present where Clayton & McKervey, an international certified public accounting and business advisory firm located in metro Detroit, is aggressively informing clients of the change and coaching them on taking action.

The final revenue recognition standard, which offers two adoption method options, the retrospective method of the cumulative effect method, was announced in May 2014 and takes effect in 2018 for public company financial statements and 2019 for private entities. The time for companies to absorb and implement the changes is now, according to Clayton & McKervey shareholder Julie Killian, CPA, who is leading the firm’s revenue recognition efforts for clients who fall under the privately held deadline.

“This is not your typical accounting standard change, which may inspire yawns and mild irritation on the part of impacted industries,” Killian said. “The new standard switches from a rules-based approach that accountants are used to in U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and moves to a more principles-based approach. Gone is the industry specific guidance that provided fairly straightforward methods of recognizing revenue in an entity. Instead, there are very broad guidelines requiring significant judgment to recognize revenue across most industries. Rather than determining which U.S. GAAP standard to apply to a transaction, management must now determine how to apply this single standard to all transactions.”

Different industries will see varying levels of impact from implementation of the new standard. Some of the most significant indicators of change can be determined by contracts that:

  • Involve multiple goods and/or services
  • Span more than one year
  • Change during the contract term
  • Have multiple revenue streams, such as a contract providing tooling and production parts
  • Are complex, with numerous variables or terms and conditions
  • Are not well documented, resulting in data that will be difficult to accumulate
  • Are costly to obtain of fulfill, such as contracts involving sales commissions
  • Have licenses or royalty agreements
  • Have compensation or debt linked to revenue
  • Have customer warranties, provide a customer with the right of return or have customer acceptance provisions

“It’s important that businesses start reviewing their contracts, purchase orders and other documentation of a sales arrangement, as the language likely includes implied contracts,” Killian said. “These arrangements with customers should be looked at individually in the context of the new revenue recognition standard to assess how the requirements will affect them. The changes to the standard have vast and far-reaching implications for almost all industries and sectors. If you have contracts and you have customers, you are likely going to be impacted.”

Despite its relative complexity (156 pages in the initial standards update plus subsequent clarifications) the standard has five distinct steps that have to be performed in order to recognize revenue. The five-step plan is to:

  1. Identify each contract the company has with a customer
  2. Identify the performance obligations in the contract
  3. Determine the transaction price for the contract
  4. Allocate the transaction price to each specific performance obligation
  5. Recognize the revenue when the entity satisfies each performance obligation

Killian notes that large companies are already speaking out on the challenging efforts to begin complying with the new revenue recognition standard.

“Many publicly traded companies have commented on the sheer volume of contracts that need to be reviewed, not to mention the high number of individual performance obligations that can be found within a single contract or amendments to contracts. It’s daunting,” Killian said.

About Clayton & McKervey

Clayton & McKervey is a full-service CPA firm helping middle-market entrepreneurial companies compete in the global marketplace. The firm is headquartered in metro Detroit and services clients throughout the world.

To learn more, visit claytonmckervey.com.

Can You Feel the Love? 5 Ways to Get Your Business Out of the Friend Zone.

By Sammie Schneider
Social Media Marketing Coordinator
AGA Productions

This post is part of the Digital Marketing Boot Camp series, a new set of blog posts across different mediums designed to provide intel to people and companies looking to improve their digital marketing strategy.

It’s that time of year again. Valentine’s Day is here, seeking to remind us all to love each other. Some are already in relationships, expecting cheap boxes of those Russell Stover assorted chocolates. Others are not quite there and depend on this day to push past the Friend Zone.

emoji faces - Digital Marketing Boot CampBut what does this have to do with digital media and business? Well, it turns out brands experience the same effects of Valentine’s Day. Brands are constantly in the Friend Zone with potential consumers until a contract is signed. Every company wants to share the sweet, cream-filled delight of loyalty with their consumers, but doesn’t want to take the cheap Russell Stover route.

Social media platforms are the key to being the Lady Godiva of your streets. To be bold, modest, and leave a legacy. I’m not suggesting you ride horseback and naked through your town to prove your allegiance to the people of your community. Just be authentic and stand by what you claim. After all, a brand is a promise to a consumer. Make sure your social media reflects and enhances that promise.


MORE: Learn more about improving your relationship with clients at the Digital Marketing Boot Camp, Feb. 15


That being said, here are the five steps to help you move toward a relationship with a client.

1. Make a confident approach

You have nothing to lose and everything to gain. If business with this client is your goal, then approach them confidently and be ready with reasons why it will work and why you are the best option for them. Don’t just stand by, frustrated, as you watch said client “date” another company. Think about how many relationships start on social media. Someone “likes” an Instagram post and suddenly sparks are flying. How is this any different when it comes to business profiles? Win them over through social interaction. Figure out your brand’s voice and make it personable and honest. Be inclusive and open, whether this means posting a “selfie” at an event, or reaching out to possible clients in the area by “liking” their photos or commenting on posts.

2. Evaluate perspective

Ever think about someone close to you and wonder why you’ve never dated? You start going through a mental list of pros and cons and base it off of what you want, and never look at things from their point of view? If you’re a business who is only focused on superficial commerce, the likely result is a friends-with-benefits deal. Maybe you’re into that. But chances are your customers want a real relationship. They want someone they can trust with their finances and values. Knowing what your target audience wants will lead to reliable, long-term investment. Social media acts as a great resource in finding out just what it is that your consumers want.

Host a Twitter chat answering questions, or craft regular Twitter polls to accrue valuable and instant feedback. Many media outlets allow for businesses to build a customer service program with listed hours of availability dedicated to speaking directly to people. Consumers want to be a part of the brands they value; they want to be able to shape them. It’s not just about what you want.

3. Don’t play the sex card

This isn’t just about the appeal anymore. Consumers want transparency; they want to know the inside you. They care more about the intentions of the brand than your Instagram aesthetic and wordy, fluffed up mission statement. Take this time to post behind the scenes moments of a typical work day, or post a picture of your view from the office window. You can be creative in the ways you execute your purpose and promote your products, but there’s no need to pass yourself off as something you’re not. Build your brand organically without attempting to imitate others.

4. The “C” word

Commitment. The only word that might be scarier than that “love” one that saturates all of our timelines and feeds around Valentine’s Day. So how can you reinforce the commitment between you and your consumers? It takes time to cultivate strong relationships. If they’re not ready to take the plunge after your first interaction can you really blame them? There’s no need to trick them into purchasing packages they don’t actually want, or to give false information that will lock your consumers into an unchanging contract. Sit down with your potential clients, ask them what they want out of your relationship, and provide flexibility so that your relationship can grow and evolve as the company does.

5. Be persistent

Your client may need time to process this information; no pressure, and no demands for an answer from your end. There’s a difference between persistence and pressure. Use Facebook Connections to target those who might be on the fence about an upcoming event. Send a brief, light reminder encouraging them to attend. Use Instagram Insights to learn about your followers so you can tailor your content and post at the best times. Use software such as Hootsuite to manage Twitter and Instagram profiles. With this, you can post based on analytics so that your followers have a better chance of seeing your content more frequently. You can also rotate ads every three to five days for fresh, but effective marketing. This allows for persistence on a more subtle level, without direct pressure.

They have the information needed. You’ve given your pitch. Continue fostering that relationship by keeping up the friendly social media connectivity and being genuine in your posts. If a consumer sees the true face behind a company, they will be more comfortable getting to know you better. And you will increase the possibility of a relationship.

←Back to Digital Marketing Boot Camp

Read more about customer relationships:

Think Like a Customer

 

Think Like a Customer

By Eric Hultgren
Director of Marketing
MLive Media Group

This post is part of the Digital Marketing Boot Camp series, a new set of blog posts across different mediums designed to provide intel to people and companies looking to improve their digital marketing strategy.

Whenever you get into a conversation about the digital marketing landscape, you are going to hear people say “be authentic,” “don’t sell,” or “make a connection” and these are all correct – but how do you do all that?

One of the biggest questions I get from clients is on how to be authentic, which as a question seems silly, right? Just be yourself. However, in a larger marketing context connected to an entire campaign, that answer is pointed in the wrong direction. The key to social is not necessarily for you to be yourself (although that helps), the major key is that you act like your customer.

What does your customer want from the brand? What should their journey be through to conversion? What should the experience be after the sale? What do you want them to say to a friend? The answer to these questions stems from you understanding what your customer is like in the first place.

Say you are a lawn care business who wants to execute a campaign on Facebook because you understand that your audience is there waiting. The thing is, they aren’t waiting for you. Nobody is using Facebook for the ads, or the sponsored content, or the native advertising. They are on Facebook to connect with friends, laugh, blow off steam, or waste some time.

Knowing this you could put up a photo of a lawnmower with text that reads: “Book your lawn care appointments before spring and save 10%” and that might work.

The alternative is that you could put up a video of your team making a lawn look amazing and in that video the homeowner is on their deck drinking iced tea and reading a book, the text of that post would read: “what would you do with an extra 2 hours every Saturday this summer?” At the end of the video the book now button would appear and you would have made a connection with your customer.


MORE: Learn to put the human touch back into your marketing at the Digital Marketing Boot Camp, Feb. 15


Why?

The person who is booking lawn care services wants to save time. They either don’t have it to begin with or they just don’t like mowing the lawn. So, if we are thinking like our customer our ads need to address what they are feeling and why they would be interested in you in the first place. What would I do with 8 extra hours a month because of your service? No idea, but you have my attention.

Which, after all, is the goal: attention. Marketers are driving clients to social because people don’t watch TV ads like they used to, they don’t listen to radio like they used to, and they don’t pay attention to billboards like they used to. Marketing continues to change but the single constant is that you need to go where the customer is and start thinking like them. Your customer is very savvy and has zero time for terrible display ads in their Facebook feed.

You want to win in the social space? There are lots of tips and tactics that can help you get there but until you understand what your customer wants and how they want to get there, you are going to spend a lot of time trying out different versions of your brand’s authentic self before you hit a home run. However, if your competition is better at listening, better at creative, and better at connecting than you are, you don’t have time to guess on what might work.

Eric Hultgren will moderate a panel discussion at the Digital Marketing Boot Camp.

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More by Eric Hultgren

Welcome to the Age of Ephemeral Marketing

Magnet Consulting Introduces The Mettle Foundry Featuring The Forge

Professional, career development has taken on an exciting new twist at Magnet Consulting’s ‘The Mettle Foundry’, now open in Rochester Hills.

The Mettle Foundry is a professional development center built on the idea that true leadership is unfinished, rough, and beautifully flawed. The goal at TMF is to examine professional strengths and weaknesses in a fun, productive setting to refine and fortify authentic mettle as an individual or team.

The Mettle Foundry features ‘The Forge’, a problem solving room similar to the escape rooms that are growing in popularity across the country. Unique to The Forge is that it is staffed by trained behaviorists and psychologists who observe and evaluate team and individual behavior.

Each Forge session will include pre-consultation with one of Magnet Consulting’s behavioral experts, an onsite post-Forge class on whatever was the biggest concern for that team, and behavioral reports for the team and each individual. Teams walk away with tools for better communication, problem solving, conflict management and success.

“We believe that better people equals business success,” said Sandy Fiaschetti, Ph.D., Magnet Consulting Co-Founder. “The professionals at Magnet Consulting have spent decades assisting companies with their employee selection, team and leader development, and corporate culture. It was a natural flow for us to create a dedicated space for our clients and the community to sharpen their talents and develop more tools for success.”

In addition to The Forge, The Mettle Foundry will also offer career development workshops, internship training and bootcamps, staff retreats and individual on-site coaching.

“Based upon the response of the community as we have previewed The Mettle Foundry, I’m excited to launch Intern Bootcamp this summer. Intern Bootcamp is the last, and possibly most important, camp a parent will send their high-school senior or pre-college student to 17-22 to and the first place an employer will send a new intern,” said Nicole Lentz, Magnet Consulting Co-Founder. “Here, students will have a week simulation of ‘real work’ and receive real-time feedback on their performance. They will also learn the practical aspects of work that so often are overlooked, like office etiquette, scheduling conference calls, how to talk on that call, and much more.”

Sandy Fiaschetti, PhD and Nicole Lentz, MSF founded Magnet Consulting in 2012, bringing together both organizational psychology and financial experience from automotive, international, and regional industries to clients across the country.

Magnet Consulting works with businesses and municipalities helping them achieve their goals through proven scientific methods of workplace selection and development. Magnet Consulting’s passion is to engage each individual within an organization from the time of hire through the entire career.

The Mettle Foundry, Magnet Consulting’s onsite development facility, is located at 455 South Livernois Road Suite C12 in Rochester Hills, MI. For more information, visit www.themettlefoundry.com.

Dickinson Wright to Partner with Canadian Government and PNC Bank on “International Insight: Succeeding in Canada” Seminar

Dickinson Wright PLLC is pleased to announce that it will partner with the Consulate General of Canada for Michigan and PNC Bank for a seminar on “International Insight: Succeeding in Canada” on Thursday, November 17, 2016 at Washtenaw Community College in Ann Arbor, Mich.

The event will feature experts to assist those companies seeking to explore new markets in Canada. Key topics will include the Canada/U.S. trade and investment relationship, government and legal practices, and cross border payment. Speakers at this event include: Sebastien Roy of the Consulate General of Canada for Michigan; Dan Ujczo from Dickinson Wright; Richard Corson from the U.S. Department of Commerce; Gerald Solensky from Zomedica; Sue Tuson from Clayton & McKervey; and Ric DeVore, George Hoffman, Daniel McCarty, Louise McDonnell, and David Olson from PNC Bank. Below are the event details:

“International Insight: Succeeding in Canada” Seminar

Date: Thursday, November 17, 2016
Time: 11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (Registration & Lunch Buffet)
12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. (Speaker Presentations)
Location: Washtenaw Community College
Morris Lawrence Building
4800 E. Huron River Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48105

Dickinson Wright’s U.S.-Canada team consists of more than 200 highly-trained, dedicated lawyers who are at the forefront of working with businesses and governments to navigate legal issues surrounding the largest two-way trading relationship in the world. Dickinson Wright’s cross-border expertise in corporate structuring, financing, and taxation – coupled with the firm’s unrivalled regulatory, real estate, immigration, intellectual property, and distribution expertise – makes Dickinson Wright a leading provider of cross-border legal services.

About Dickinson Wright PLLC
Dickinson Wright PLLC is a general practice business law firm with more than 425 attorneys among more than 40 practice areas and 16 industry groups. Headquartered in Detroit and founded in 1878, the firm has seventeen offices, including six in Michigan (Detroit, Troy, Ann Arbor, Lansing, Grand Rapids, and Saginaw) and ten other domestic offices in Austin, Texas; Columbus, Ohio; Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; Lexington, Ky.; Nashville and Music Row, Tenn.; Las Vegas and Reno, Nev.; Phoenix, Ariz.; and Washington, D.C. The firm’s Canada office is located in Toronto.

Dickinson Wright offers our clients a distinctive combination of superb client service, exceptional quality, value for fees, industry expertise and business acumen. As one of the few law firms with ISO/IEC 27001:2013 certification, Dickinson Wright has built state-of-the-art, independently-verified risk management controls and security processes for our commercial transactions. Dickinson Wright lawyers are known for delivering commercially-oriented advice on sophisticated transactions and have a remarkable record of wins in high-stakes litigation. Dickinson Wright lawyers are regularly cited for their expertise and experience by Chambers, Best Lawyers, Super Lawyers, and other leading independent law firm evaluating organizations.

UHY LLP Michigan Hosts Annual Not-for-Profit update

UHY LLP, the fifth largest accounting firm in southeast Michigan, will host their third annual Not-for-Profit Accounting Update on Thursday, November 10 from 8:00AM-10:15AM in Farmington Hills.

Join UHY to learn more about the proposed changes to nonprofit financial reporting, upcoming changes to the Single Audit, and other best practices and developments. Two hours of A&A CPE (qualifies for Yellow Book credit) is available.

“After years of design, there has been significant changes in the presentation of financial statements for nonprofit entities. Our annual Not-for-Profit Update will explain and clarify the changes made in order to prepare your organization”, said Erica Battle, nonprofit specialist, UHY LLP. “It will surely be a valuable resource for all those involved in the financial planning of their organizations.”

Click here to view the invitation: http://www.uhy-us.com/Portals/0/Not%20For%20Profit/NFP_Annual_Update_2016_Invite%20FINAL.pdf

To RSVP contact Jessica Labut at jlabut@uhy-us.com or 586 843 2507.