MICHauto on the Paul W. Smith Show

August 7, 2019

WJR

MICHauto Executive Director Glenn Stevens and Sen. Wayne Schmidt (R-Traverse City) joined WJR’s Paul W. Smith from CAR Management Briefing Seminars at the Grand Traverse Resort to discuss MICHauto and the Michigan Auto Caucus’ focus to protect and grow the automotive and mobility industry.

Listen to their conversation:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MICHauto Investors Gather in Lansing for Annual Meetings with Legislators

“Meeting with legislators is crucial to ensuring that policymakers understand the industry’s issues, opportunities, and our collective economic impact,” said Glenn Stevens, executive director of MICHauto and vice president of automotive and mobility initiatives for the Detroit Regional Chamber.

On Tuesday, April 16, the Chamber’s MICHauto initiative gathered executives from 25 automotive companies to meet with 25 legislators in Lansing for the 2019 Automobility Day at the Capitol. Automotive experts and executives discussed the industry’s impact with legislators including MICHauto’s 2019 policy priorities. This year’s priorities focus on the further development of talent, technology, and trade as the key drivers of progress.

“The MICHauto policy priorities were created with the automotive industry and represent their thoughts on what we need to focus on to ensure future economic success,” Stevens said.

MICHauto values the opportunity to foster collaboration between industry leaders and the state government, which will ultimately strengthen Michigan’s economy and reinforce its standing as the automotive capital of the world. Many individuals contribute to this shared effort, and each year MICHauto recognizes one of them for their commitment to supporting the automotive and mobility industry in Michigan.

This year, MICHauto named Rep. Rebekah Warren Legislator of the Year for her dedication to driving next-generation vehicle R&D, her sponsorship and creation of the framework to allow the establishment of the American Center for Mobility, and her appointment on the Michigan Council on Future Mobility.

The sixth annual Automobility Day at the Capitol highlighted how a strong partnership with Michigan’s political leadership will continue to promote a promising future for the state’s automotive and mobility industry.

 

Rolled out new car presentation type motor show

January 17, 2019

Wedge Infinity

Teru Nakanishi

This article has been translated from Japanese.

The North American International Auto Show, which is held in January every year in the US Detroit known as “Motor City”, opened on the 14th and was released to reporters. Approximately 5000 media from all over the world gathered and about 750 vehicles including the latest models were exhibited by automobile manufacturers in the United States, Europe, China, Korea, Japan, India and others.

In the automobile show other than Detroit, the Shanghai show backed by the Chinese market attracted attention, and the world’s largest technology trade fair (CES) held in Las Vegas on the 8th was attracted to automatic driving and “flying car” etc. Many of the latest technologies of the next generation will be exhibited and attracted interest from concerned parties. Since the exhibition of traditional car makers was the center focusing on the North American auto show that opens shortly after that, the impact was weak and the shadow became thin compared to CES.

For this reason, officials of the North American auto show with a feeling of crisis will decide to change the opening time from winter to June from 2020, aiming to restore the position as a car show. From next year I will increase the number of outdoor exhibitions etc and I will call on BMW etc. to resume exhibition and I would like to take in new technologies such as automatic driving and make it a new type of show.

Mr. Glenn Stevens, Executive Vice President of the Detroit Chamber of Commerce and Industry and Vice Chairman of the Automated Driving Council, said, “We have to turn it into an auto show to prepare for a new era of the automobile industry such as automatic driving and mobility services etc. From next year it will be summer So you can also add events of famous Detroit music and fireworks.

We need a new concept not only for automobile manufacturers, but also for people involved in automatic operation, start-up and movement, “the era when only leading traditional major automakers lead the North American auto show It is not pointed out that.

View original article here

GM’s job cuts mean new kind of worker needed

November 6, 2018

Detroit Free Press

By: Jamie L. LaReau

General Motors is a technology company that makes cars and the skills its employees had yesterday are continuously becoming outdated.

Experts say that is the underlying message of GM CEO Mary Barra’s move on Oct. 31 to offer voluntary buyouts to GM’s North American salaried workers with 12 or more years of experience with the company.

On the surface, it’s typical cost-cutting ahead of a potential dip in new-car sales and rising raw material costs. But look closer.

“GM is signaling a change in vehicle technology. If they go into electric more rapidly, then they do not need the same engineers they have now,” said Maryann Keller, principal of Maryann Keller & Associates in the New York area. “The advent of electric vehicles has profound implications for employment in the auto industry’s competition and the skill sets needed to compete.”

Consider that Barra hails from a human resources background, so targeting employees with long seniority and high pay grades is strategic when a company is moving toward the development of more electric cars, fuel cells and autonomous vehicles, experts say. It means redeploying the workforce and freeing up significant capital, said Marick Masters, professor of business at Wayne State University.

“Technology has changed so fast and is changing so fast that if you’ve been out of school 10 or 20 years, you’re not at the leading edge anymore,” said Masters. “This will give GM an opportunity to create a greenfield of sorts, to create a new company within a company.”

The New Worker

Besides wanting to be futuristic, GM’s cost cutting is also a necessity.

Its current cost structure and product mix make it more vulnerable to a sales downturn than Ford and Fiat Chrysler, said market economist Jon Gabrielsen, an adviser to the auto industry. He said GM can afford to lose only a quarter of its current car sales in North America before going in the red.

GM won’t say which jobs or which areas of the business it looks to trim beyond saying the offers are voluntary — for now — and will go to employees with 12-plus years experience.

But GM has been adding a younger workforce with technology-heavy skills in recent years. In fact, only about 17,700 of GM’s 50,000 salaried workers in North America have the 12-plus years seniority to qualify for a buyout offer. Experts say that indicates the bulk of GM’s workers are new to the company, possibly with a focus beyond traditional vehicle design and engineering.

A GM spokesman confirmed that “about 40 percent” of its U.S. workforce has been with the company five years or less.

The company’s changing focus opens up opportunities to millennials, those people ages 22 to 37 who might change their perception of GM from that of a stodgy carmaker bankrupt a few years ago to a technology company that offers some advantages over that of a start-up, Wayne State’s Masters said.

But for older workers already in the auto industry, it means they must up their game and continuous training is a requisite.

“I don’t know if they’re extinct or need a new degree, but they need to be engaged in continued learning and advancement,” said Masters. “They need to be agile. Organizations do not guarantee lifetime employment anymore. This is a statement that the world is changing.”

A New Company

The “new” GM will want workers who are highly creative and capable of working autonomously as well as collaboratively, Masters said. The future employee will take initiative and have a strong technology background, good communication skills and project-management capability. GM might do more contract hiring to keep fixed costs low and GM’s agility high, he said.

“China is taking the lead in electric vehicles. Ford has an aggressive plan to redeploy its investments along those lines, too,” Masters said. “So GM has to have the flexibility to free up staff and have the capital available to invest in this technology.”

GM has been on an aggressive hiring spree in part because it wants to be first to deploy a fleet of self-driving electric cars in a city next year. In fact, the same day GM said it would trim its workforce, a GM spokesman told the Free Press GM will continue to hire in certain areas it is expanding, namely engineering and technology for its work on self-driving and electric cars.

Two years ago, GM bought its self-driving vehicle arm, GM Cruise. GM Cruise employed 40 people at that time. Today it employs about 800, said GM President Dan Ammann.

GM’s hiring reflects a statewide trend. The skills needed for future automotive jobs in Michigan are shifting as the auto industry here transitions to a future of mobility beyond tradition personal car ownership, said Glenn Stevens, executive director of MICHauto and vice president of Automotive and Mobility Initiatives for Detroit Regional Chamber.

“You have the convergence of the auto and the tech industry going on,” said Stevens. “The different modes of transportation and the development of electrification are increasing, so we have to make sure we’re leading for the next generation of mobility. The companies here have to make sure they do the same thing.”

Deeper Cuts

GM said it does not have a target for how many salaried workers it wants to take the offers. But if it doesn’t remove enough costs from that and other efforts, such as halting renovation work at two Michigan facilities, it will consider involuntary job cuts after Jan. 1.

For that reason, Keller said she expects the voluntary buyouts will get a higher than usual take rate.

“Knowing that there will be cuts no matter, and the labor market is strong, should increase the take rate,” said Keller. “I don’t recall what it was in the past, but it was low when jobs were scarce.”

Gabrielsen believes only 10 to 20 percent will take the offers and GM will be forced to cut jobs to support earnings amid plateauing new-car sales and rising commodities costs. In total, he estimated about 7,000 salaried GM employees in metro Detroit will be gone through the voluntary or involuntary termination.

“Typically, in downturns, they start off hoping they won’t have to cut too bad,” said Gabrielsen. “But as things cycle down in the industry, you have to do another tranche and another tranche and another.”

GM’s Troubles

Recently at CityLab 2018 in Detroit, Mary Barra was asked if GM is a technology company, not just a car company. Her unwavering reply was: “That is my goal.”

So as Barra has worked to pour resources into developing AV/EV technology including forming investment partnerships with Japan’s SoftBank and Honda earlier this year, it has also been cutting costs for several years in other areas. GM said it would make $6.5 billion in reductions for 2018, but the voluntary job cuts will not benefit GM until 2019.

Since emerging from bankruptcy in 2010, GM has added about 28,000 employees in North America, about half of whom are hourly, said Gabrielsen. But GM has not gained North American market share.

Gabrielsen, who pulls his data from GM’s SEC filings, said in 2009 the automaker had a 20 percent market share in North America selling 2.5 million vehicles. Each year since, GM’s market share has slid. Last year, GM sold 3.6 million vehicles, but its market share was 16.6 percent, he said.

“They can’t support as much fixed cost with the smaller market share,” Gabrielsen said. “This is an economy-of-scale business. When you get above a certain sales volume you can print money. When it drops, you bleed money.”

He said GM is precariously vulnerable to a sales downturn.

“GM can afford to lose 25 percent of its unit sales in North America before it goes into the red. That’s if they slash heads on the way down,” Gabrielsen said. “Chrysler and Ford can afford to lose 50 percent of their sales in North America before they’re in the red.”

But GM is not alone in wanting a leaner company. Ford also is working to reduce its salaried workforce. Ford has not provided specifics on how many jobs will be cut or over what time frame in its $11-billion “fitness” plan.

Wall Street Woes

While economists agree that a storm of economic headwinds is swirling around the auto industry, threatening profitability, GM faces one more challenge: Wall Street.

Since taking the helm in January 2014, Barra has yet to satisfy investors. Right before reporting third-quarter results on Oct. 31, GM shares traded about 6 percent below the $33 per share price at which they launched in 2010 in a post-bankruptcy initial public offering, according to Reuters. GM’s stock price hit an all-time high of $46.48 on Oct. 24, 2017, but had declined to $36.25 as of Nov. 5.

Last month, Reuters reported it contacted several shareholders who said GM could face a third major action by activist shareholders in less than four years if the share price does not improve.

GM’s voluntary buyout program and halts to renovations will appease Wall Street for some time, analysts said.

“I wouldn’t want to be any of the auto company CEOs right now,” said Gabrielsen. “None of them want to slash anybody, so if they’re doing it at all it’s because of Wall Street pressure.”

View the original article

 

Overview Of 2018 MICHauto Summit: Explore Your Automobility Future

October 18, 2018

Michigan Business Network

Chris Holman welcomes Glenn Stevens, Executive Director, MICHauto; Vice President, Automotive and Mobility Initiatives, Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce, Detroit, MI. Glenn gives a recap of the 2018 MICHauto Summit: Explore Your Automobility Future.

MICHauto’s signature event offers automotive industry leaders, students and interns the unique opportunity to connect and help explore future career opportunities directly from leaders working in the industry. Conversations and topics will explore the future of the automotive, mobility and technology fields and how the industry is rapidly changing from decades past.

Glenn joins Chris for a recap below:

View the original article here.

Mayor Mike Duggan Proclaims Oct. 7-12 Mobility Week in Detroit

Mayor Mike Duggan has joined businesses across the city and region to celebrate Detroit’s global leadership in automotive next-generation mobility technology by issuing a proclamation that recognizes this week, Oct. 7-12, “Mobility Week” in Detroit.

Through collaborative efforts by the Detroit Regional Chamber’s MICHauto initiative, Quicken Loans Community Fund and the Michigan Economic Development Corp. and PlanetM, TechStars Mobility and Henry Ford Health System, a number of events will take place across Detroit to showcase the industry highlighting career opportunities, the cross-section between health care and mobility, and the transformational technology being developed.

“Detroit has historically been the center of the automotive universe, and now our city is leading the way into the next generation of the industry,” said Mayor Mike Duggan. “It makes perfect sense to shape the future of mobility right here in Detroit, and I’m proud to proclaim this week as Mobility Week.”

Many of the region’s assets will be on display, including Detroit’s growing startup ecosystem, technology development of the region, and the work Detroit’s Transportation and Mobility Office is engaging in the city and neighborhoods around transportation solutions.

“This proclamation calls attentions to the diverse players in mobility to celebrate our leadership in next-generation mobility,” said Glenn Stevens, executive director of MICHauto and vice president of Automotive and Mobility Initiatives for the Chamber. “We have come so far, and it is important to share and celebrate the new technology the industry offers with the public.”

Learn more about some of the Mobility Week Detroit events, including the 2018 MICHauto Summit below or visit www.mobilityweekdetroit.com.

MICHauto Summit: Explore Your Automobility Future

Oct. 10
The Beacon at One Woodward

MICHauto’s signature event engages automotive industry leaders with students and interns from regional universities, colleges and trade schools for a full day of programming. The Summit offers a unique opportunity to discuss the evolution of the automotive industry and its career pathways. Automotive and mobility industry professionals will share the career pathways with more than 160 students and interns. Conversations and topics will examine the future of the automotive, mobility and technology fields and how the industry is rapidly changing from decades past.

 

Henry Ford Health System all for you logo

The Eye, The Brain & The Auto
Oct. 7-9
MotorCity Casino

 

The 8th World Research Congress on Vision and Driving is focusing on the autonomous vehicle technology and its impact on health care. The three-day world congress will look at the way mobility technology is disrupting the way IT, big-data management and health care does business. Sessions will touch on how vision and cognition will play a key role in connected and autonomous vehicles, their development and how users interact with them. It also will highlight how the medical field can contribute and benefit from the development of driverless cars, trusts and other forms of transportation.

 

TechStars Demo Day 
Oct. 9
Detroit Film Theater

 

 

The 2018 Class of startups enrolled in the Techstars Mobility Accelerator will be center stage as they graduate from this unique mentoring program. More than a thousand investors, community members, students and representatives from the automotive and transportation industries will be in the audience to hear about new technology, autonomous advances and mobility answers from the Techstars participants. The event is the largest single-day startup and innovation event nationwide, organizers say, giving these up-and-coming entrepreneurs a venue to share their ideas and network with industry executives in real and substantial ways. Techstars with its worldwide network that focusing on helping entrepreneurs succeed offers its mobility program solely in Detroit. Its current class of 11 companies is the most diverse to date, has businesses that span a wide array of mobility solutions and comes from countries across the globe, including Hong Kong and London.

 

Detroit Moves
Oct. 10-11
Spirit Plaza

 

This free and family-friendly two-day outdoor festival brings people together with mobility companies, industry leaders and the latest in technology at Detroit’s Spirit Plaza. Now in its second year, Detroit Moves is a showcase for connected and autonomous vehicles as well as the people who make these high-tech machines, organizers say. The festival also includes art exhibits, musical performances, food and family-orientated activities such as a mobility-themed scavenger hunt. Additional activities include an educational village featuring STEM careers and area universities such as Wayne State and the Center for Creative Studies, a startup village with mobility-related startup companies and a social hour featuring food, beverage and entertainment from 5-7 p.m. on Oct. 11. Some exhibitors included May Mobility, which has an autonomous transport that takes Bedrock Detroit employees around the downtown core, as well as MoGo, Maven, Chariot, Airspace and America’s Automotive Trust.

Top Automotive Executives to Meet with Legislators on MICHauto Policy Priorities; State Senator Wayne Schmidt Named Legislator of the Year

DETROIT (May 17, 2018) – Today, MICHauto, a statewide initiative of the Detroit Regional Chamber, convenes 23 automotive executives for meetings with 27 state legislators in Lansing. For the fifth consecutive year, MICHauto has brought together the automotive industry and legislators to discuss the impact of the industry across the state. This year, industry leaders identified policy priorities that are most important to their continued growth.

The 2018 policy priorities focus on the following areas:

  • Industry Talent Pipeline: Development of a strong talent pipeline for the automotive industry and next-generation mobility development.
  • Connected and Automated Vehicle R&D and Testing: Ensure that Michigan remains at the forefront for companies and research institutions.
  • International Trade: Encourage productive efforts to promote fair trade through the pursuit of high-standard trade agreements.

View the full policy priorities.

“The MICHauto policy priorities were created with the automotive industry and represent their thoughts on what we need to focus on to ensure future economic success,” said Glenn Stevens, executive director of MICHauto and vice president of automotive and mobility initiatives for the Chamber. “Meeting with legislators is crucial to ensuring that policymakers understand the industry’s issues, opportunities, and our collective economic impact.”

Additionally, each year, MICHauto recognizes a distinguished legislator for his or her commitment to the state and the automotive industry. This year’s honoree state Sen. Wayne Schmidt (R-Traverse City) will be recognized during a luncheon reception between meetings.

Sen. Schmidt’s commitment to automated vehicle R&D, his sponsorship and advocacy on behalf of the Good Jobs for Michigan legislative package, and his support for modernization and expansion of the Soo Locks, all serve as compelling testaments to his leadership in supporting Michigan’s largest industry and creating jobs across the state.

“I am honored to be named Legislator of the Year,” Schmidt said. “The policy priorities outlined by MICHauto highlight the importance of protecting our state’s legacy automotive industry. As Michigan positions itself to lead the industry’s transformation, I look forward to working with our industry to protect its future.”

Past recipients of the Legislator of the Year award include Sens. Steve Bieda (D-Warren), Ken Horn (R-Frankenmuth) and Mike Kowall (R-White Lake).

Detroit Is Becoming the Silicon Valley of Smart Mobility Tech

March 5, 2018

By Marcus Amick

Silicon Valley might be the first place that comes to mind when one thinks of groundbreaking technology, but there’s another major tech revolution underway some 2,300 miles east. 

Building on decades of experience putting the world on wheels, Michigan has been busily establishing its own reputation as a place for high-tech innovation, from engineering the next level of electric batteries to the development of driverless ride-sharing vehicles. It’s a shift that’s quickly transforming the Detroit-anchored manufacturing hub, long known for its growling muscle cars and massive luxury SUVs, into a burgeoning tech spot that’s poised to drive the future of mobility.

The area’s transformation into a hotbed for mobility ideas is being driven by an expansive partnership across the state with car companies, automotive suppliers, universities, local agencies, startups and others in the public and private sectors, which has created a research and development ecosystem unlike any other in the world.

Playboy recently had a chance to get an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at some of the collaborative efforts that are leading the charge, touring places like the Toyota Research Institute (TRI) and University of Michigan’s Mcity.

Launched in 2016, TRI aims to bridge the gap between research and product development in the mobility space, spanning from artificial intelligence to cutting-edge robotics. The Ann Arbor-based Mcity, which opened in 2015, brings together leaders from the auto sector, government and academia to work on new innovations for practically every facet of self-driving vehicle technology, from pedestrian detection systems to connected vehicles. In fact, later this year, Mcity will launch operations for what is believed to be the first fully autonomous shuttle to be used on a college campus to transport students, faculty and staff.

Michigan also just celebrated the opening of the American Center for Mobility (ACM), a state-of-the-art proving ground for connected and automated vehicle technology. The 500-acre site will provide researchers and engineers with real-world driving dynamics when testing driverless vehicles, and includes a 2.5-mile highway loop, a 700-foot curved tunnel, two double overpasses, intersections and roundabouts.

At the U-M Energy Institute Battery Lab, researchers are working on ways to develop cheaper and longer-lasting energy-storage devices that will make automobiles more efficient in the future. Even the Michigan-based pizza company Domino’s has jumped into the fray, teaming up with Ford Motor Co. to conduct a pilot project in Michigan, where pizza deliveries were made with an autonomous Ford Fusion Hybrid, and customers were able to use GPS technology to follow their delivery vehicle with an upgraded version of Domino’s Tracker system. Ford is now revving up to apply the lessons learned in the Michigan pilot project to launch its first self-driving vehicle business in Miami and Miami Beach, in a partnership with Domino’s and the food delivery service Postmates.

Trevor Pawl, Group VP of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC), an organization helping to connect the dots in the state’s mobility strategy, says it only makes sense for Michigan to take a leading role in the space.

“Seventy-six percent of the American auto industry’s research and development happens in the state of Michigan. Ninety-six percent of the top 100 automotive suppliers in North America have a presence in Michigan. And Michigan has the greatest concentration of original equipment manufacturers in the world,” notes Pawl, who also serves as VP of PlanetM, an arm of MEDC that focuses solely on mobility issues. “If a new vehicle technology is going to be produced for the masses, that technology will likely run through an executive, designer, buyer or engineer in Michigan.”

According to PlanetM, Michigan has led the nation in mobility-related patents over the past five years, and is home to 49 connected and automated vehicle projects—more than any other state. The North American International Show, held in early January in Detroit, devoted an entire area to showcasing some of the strides the city is making in the tech-driven mobility space.

Playboy had a chance to get a more hands-on take on some of that progress, when given the opportunity to test drive the 238-mile-range Chevrolet Bolt EV in Los Angeles, a city in which one gets a true sense of the dire need for smarter mobility. All of the engineering, battery development and vehicle integration for the electric Chevy hatch, which was first introduced at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show (CES), was done in Michigan. The surprisingly peppy Bolt EV, which starts at around $36,000, is now widely considered to be the go-to example on how to successfully pull off a “true” electric vehicle for the masses, a mark that even the Northern California-based Tesla has struggled with, despite its popularity as a brand.

Still, the idea, Pawl tells Playboy, is not for Michigan to compete with Silicon Valley, but rather to build a more cohesive partnership with California. “Both regions need one another,” he says. “California can leverage Michigan’s production expertise, and Michigan can benefit from Silicon Valley’s software prowess and startup ecosystem.”

For Detroit, the state’s shift into the area of mobility has become a pivotal part of the city’s local development strategy, as a means of solving transportation issues for Detroit’s nearly 700,000 residents, and luring more businesses and people to the city.

“Getting from A to B is one of the basic functions of life. And as we grow as a city, both for people that have been here for 50 years as well as potential new residents, both have that same need of getting where they need to go and doing it in a way that’s safe, fast and affordable. And that’s what we are striving to do,” says Mark de la Vergne, the City of Detroit’s chief of mobility innovation. “We need to continue to make investments in transit and make it easier for people to do it. We want this to be able to provide the mobility that allows people to get where they need to be, whether that’s their job, whether that’s a doctor’s appointment, whether that’s their school. It’s important part of life.”

The city’s partnerships with groups like Techstars, a global mentoring and funding network that has an automotive mobility arm in Detroit, are more specifically focused on fostering the other side of that development strategy, namely attracting new startups to the city.

To date, Techstars has bought in a group of more than 30 diverse companies from around the world that are focused on developing new automotive mobility technologies. “A handful came from Michigan. It’s almost all external, companies that actually wanted to come to Detroit,” says Ted Serbinski, managing director of Techstars mobility. “Startups know that if you want to be in automotive, you have to come here.”

Detroit’s positioning in Michigan’s growth as a major mobility development hub is also being fueled by longer-standing businesses such as the Lear Corporation, an automotive supplier that develops high-tech seating systems, which opened a satellite innovation center in the city’s downtown area in 2016.

Stephen Rober, VP of engineering at Lear, says the downtown location gives the company prime access to one of the most critical resources needed when it comes to automotive innovations. “This lets us tap more directly into the city’s infrastructure, the schools that are here, the local universities,” Rober tells Playboy. “It gives us more direct access…to that raw talent.”

Looking to make a more direct connection in its mobility strategy, Ford, which is headquartered on the outskirts of the city, is also gearing up to open a new office in downtown Detroit focused on autonomous and electric vehicles that will house more than 200 employees. The popular ride-sharing services Lyft and Uber have been pushing to make a bigger play in Detroit as well. In addition, the University of Michigan startup May Mobility has been using Downtown Detroit as a major hub for testing its new driverless shuttles as part of its future growth strategy.

Of course, the city long known as the “car capital” of the world is nowhere close to abandoning its core tradition of crafting cool cars out of hunks of sheet metal, which has shaped the area for more than 100 years. But it’s clear that the region is more focused on redefining itself for the future of transportation, rather than reveling in its legacy.

“We fully design, integrate, engineer and build some of the most world-class vehicles. But mobility is changing and it has to,” says Glenn Stevens, executive director of the Detroit Regional Chamber MICHauto and vice president of the chamber’s Automotive & Mobility Initiatives. “These forces that are hitting us—where people are moving to cities, scarcity of resources…and everything in between—means that we need to use our base platform of innovation in automotive to transform our industry here in Michigan and Detroit to the way the world is consuming mobility.”

This article was originally published on www.playboy.com on March 5, 2018. 

Industry experts emphasize talent needs and changing perceptions of automotive on “Autoline”

If you’re a mobility startup, you need to be in Detroit. That was the overarching consensus from an “Autoline” Supplier Symposium panel hosted by John McElroy at the 2018 North American International Auto Show on the show floor surrounded by newly unveiled vehicles Tuesday. McElroy discussed the transformational mobility ecosystem and importance of AutoMobili-D with Glenn Stevens, vice president of automotive and mobility initiatives for the Detroit Regional Chamber and executive director of MICHauto; Chris Thomas, founding partner of Fontinalis Partners; and Alisyn Malek, chief operations officer for May Mobility.

Having the talent to compete in the race for connected technology is a key challenge industry leaders in Michigan face.

“Culture is how to attract talent. We are working really hard on the perception of the industry,” Stevens ensured.

Four years ago, MICHauto commissioned a survey of 900 students and adult influencers on their perceptions of the automotive industry and perceptions were not great. In December 2017, MICHauto released a second Automobility Career Perception Survey that showed an improvement in perceptions.

Stevens said this time around the survey included autonomous vehicles and mobility and moved the needle on automotive, but there is still a lot of work to do.

Malek echoed that sentiment and explained that her company has had no problem attracting talent to Ann Arbor because people know that is where the connections and opportunities exist.

“One of the exciting things we are working on is building our brand and name, but in Michigan with the work that MICHauto is doing, people are becoming more aware of the tech startups and the new job opportunities,” Malek explained.

Thomas agreed, crediting Techstars Mobility and the work Managing Director Ted Serbinski is doing in Detroit.

“We are seeing more funders stand up and want to be part of this,” he explained.

Thomas was one of the first venture capitalists in Detroit to invest in the mobility ecosystem and continues to spread the message that mobility is happening now and Detroit needs to continue to attract tech startups to stay ahead.

McElroy ended the panel on a positive note encouraging all three to keep moving the needle in this space.