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Black Economic Equity

Bernard Parker III, director of government relations at the Detroit Regional Chamber joined council President Jones along with Dr. Ken Harris, President/ CEO of the National Business League, Inc. and Shannon E. Dulin external affairs manager Comcast for a discussion on Black Economic Equity.

Each panelist gave different perspectives on how to achieve black economic equity in Detroit and the nation. All panelists agreed that governmental policies, digital innovation, and business equality are needed to achieve this goal.

“One of the things we had to find out through our work on racial and economic justice is that we have to do a better job at our internal focus, being able to support other organizations, and expanding our own programs,” said Parker.  knows that counting to be a leader and creating programs that elevate business opportunities to all.

“If people are working, if people have a job, then guess what you have to buy less police cars, you will have fewer police officers because you will see less crime” said Detroit City Council President Brenda Jones.

All speakers agree that equity is not as simple as giving marginalized and oppressed communities more resources its also about dismantling oppressive systems that are working exactly as they were designed. Dr. Ken Harris and City Council President Brenda Jones emphasized the need for transparency when it comes to city jobs and city contracts. “In an 80% back city, I hope we understand the importance of asking how many Detroiters are employed on city contracts and I hope we equally understand the administration’s refusal to answer questions and work collaboratory to change laws” said Jones. Jones encourages all businesses to play their role and can contribute to achieving equity.