Walsh Hosts Virtual Doctor of Management Information Session July 22

Troy, Mich., June 15, 2020 – Walsh will host a virtual information session about the Doctor of Management (D.M.) program on July 22, 2020, from 6-7 p.m.

Ann Saurbier, D.M., professor and chair of Walsh’s doctoral programs will lead the session. Topics will include a program overview, career opportunities, financial aid and scholarship information and a Q&A period. Advanced registration is recommended.

“Designed with working professionals in mind, Walsh’s D.M. program develops candidates by advancing their knowledge through a combination of academic theory and applied research,” said Dr. Saurbier. “By connecting this new knowledge with their past professional experiences, graduates are prepared for the highest levels of leadership in business or careers in consulting or business education.”

Walsh’s D.M. has both full-time and part-time pathways allowing students to progress through the program at the speed that best matches their needs. With flexible scheduling the program can be completed in as little as three years. Admission is competitive and based on a candidate’s entire portfolio of both academic and professional experience.

To learn more and register for Walsh’s virtual doctoral information session, visit apply.walshcollege.edu/register/degree-info-dm

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ABOUT WALSH
Walsh is an all-business, private, independent, not-for-profit, fully accredited college offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral business and technology degrees, as well as certificate programs. Founded in 1922, Walsh is one of Southeast Michigan’s largest graduate business schools, offering classes in several locations and online. Our internationally and nationally-ranked programs integrate theory and application to prepare graduates for successful careers. Walsh degree programs include accounting, finance, information technology, human resources, management, marketing, taxation and other fields. For more information, please visit www.walshcollege.edu.

Walsh is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (www.hlcommission.org) and the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (www.acbsp.org).

Walsh Waives Application Fees Every Wednesday in March

TROY, Mich., March 10, 2020 — Walsh will host Waiver Wednesdays for prospective students on March 11, 18 and 25 from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Prospective students can meet with a Walsh academic advisor virtually, by phone or at all locations to have transcripts evaluated, learn about Walsh’s bachelor’s and master’s programs in business and technology and receive an on-the-spot admission decision. Application fees will be waived and advanced registration is recommended.

“Students who choose Walsh typically have very busy lives, and we are known for our flexibility and personal attention,” said Karen Mahaffy, Executive Director, Admissions and Enrollment Services. “Whether meeting virtually or on-site, Waiver Wednesdays provides prospective students all the information needed to take the next steps to move their future forward.”

To learn more and register for Walsh Waiver Wednesdays, please visit https://www.walshcollege.edu/waiver-wednesday

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ABOUT WALSH
Walsh is an all-business, private, independent, not-for-profit, fully accredited college offering undergraduate and graduate business and technology degrees, as well as certificate programs. Founded in 1922, Walsh is one of the region’s largest business schools and Michigan’s third largest graduate business school, offering classes in several locations as well as online. Our nationally ranked programs integrate theory and application to prepare graduates for successful careers. Walsh degree programs include accounting, finance, information technology, management, marketing, taxation and other fields. For more information, please visit www.walshcollege.edu.

Walsh is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission
(www.hlcommission.org) and the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (www.acbsp.org).

OCC to Offer Full-Ride Scholarships for First Academic Year To 100 of Oakland County’s High School Seniors

OAKLAND COUNTY, Mich. — Oakland Community College is offering 100 qualifying high school seniors in Oakland County an incredible financial head start on their higher education next fall with a $3,500 scholarship.

Graduating high school students considering OCC for the 2020-21 academic year are encouraged to apply for a Chancellor’s Scholarship, which helps incoming, qualified students with a $3,500 award ($1,750 for the fall semester and $1,750 for the winter semester) that covers full tuition and fees for their first academic year beginning Fall Term, 2020. OCC has a total of $350,000 available for this year’s Chancellor’s Scholarships.

To qualify, students must be a high school senior graduating from a public, private, and charter or home school program in Oakland County this spring with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.6 to 4.0 and a minimum SAT score of 1200 or a minimum ACT score of 25. Adult and alternative public or private graduating high school students in Oakland County can also qualify with a GPA of 2.5 or higher.

“I am honored to again offer this scholarship to our Oakland County students because it helps to reduce the financial barrier that often limits students from achieving their dream of a college education,” said OCC Chancellor Peter Provenzano. “I received a scholarship toward college and recognize the difference that it made in my life, and want to give that same opportunity to this year’s class of high school seniors.”

The application deadline is May 1, 2020. Recipients must attend OCC at least full time (12 credit hours minimum) for both fall and winter semesters. If the student does not attend classes, the scholarship is forfeited.
Eligibility criteria and applications are available online at https://www.oaklandcc.edu/finaid/chancellors-scholarships.

About OCC

Offering nearly 100 degrees and certificates, OCC is Michigan’s largest multi-campus community college and No. 1 transfer institution in the state. The College provides academic, career training and enriching experiences, designed to empower students to reach their potential and enhance our community. More than 1 million students have enrolled in the College since it opened in 1965. A seven-person Board of Trustees governs OCC. Board members are elected on a non-partisan, at-large basis, serve as volunteers and are not paid. Mission statement: OCC is committed to empowering our students to succeed and advancing our community. Learn more at oaklandcc.edu.

OCC Appoints Dan Jenuwine Vice Chancellor for Advancement

OAKLAND COUNTY, Mich. – January 11, 2020 — Oakland Community College has promoted Daniel Jenuwine to Vice Chancellor for Advancement. In his newly expanded role, Jenuwine will be responsible for philanthropy, alumni affairs, corporate and foundation relations, and community and government relations.

Jenuwine most recently held dual roles as executive director of the OCC Foundation and interim vice chancellor for marketing and communications. He will continue in his marketing and communications role until OCC names his replacement.

“Thanks to Dan’s expertise, the Foundation achieved three consecutive record years in fundraising, and his leadership helped the College pass its millage renewal last November with a resounding 72 percent approval,” said OCC Chancellor Peter Provenzano. “Dan has a special talent for relationship building. OCC and our students will benefit from his expanded role in nurturing our connections to the communities we serve.”

Jenuwine joined OCC in January 2017 as executive director of the OCC Foundation, working with the Foundation staff and volunteer Board of Directors to advance OCC’s mission through philanthropy. He has led OCC’s award-winning marketing and communications team since May 2019, when he was named to his interim post.

“Our community partners are generous to the College in many ways,” said Jenuwine. “I look forward to working more comprehensively with them to empower our students to succeed and advance our community.”

Prior to joining OCC, Jenuwine spent ten years as a consultant with Richner + Richner, a nationally recognized fundraising consulting firm based in Ann Arbor. He also held leadership positions with the Michigan Colleges Alliance, University of Michigan-Dearborn and Wayne State University.

Jenuwine is a member of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Planned Giving Roundtable of Southeast Michigan, International Association of Business Communicators and National Council for Marketing & Public Relations.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Wayne State University, graduating summa cum laude, and Master of Science degree in Finance at Walsh College, where he distinguished himself with honors for academic excellence. He and his family live in Troy, Mich.

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About the OCC Foundation
The Oakland Community College Foundation started in 1979 to raise private donations, increase opportunities for students, and enhance the quality of education through gifts that support students with scholarships, equipment purchases and program development. The OCC Foundation is governed by a board of directions made up of community leaders.

About OCC
With five campuses in Oakland County, OCC is Michigan’s No. 1 transfer institution, offering nearly 100 degrees and certificates. The College empowers academic and developmental experiences, allowing students to reach their potential and enhance their communities. More than 1 million students have enrolled in the college since it opened in 1965. A seven-person Board of Trustees governs OCC. Board members are elected on a non-partisan, at-large basis, serve as volunteers and are not paid. Mission statement: OCC is committed to empowering our students to succeed and advancing our community. Learn more at oaklandcc.edu.

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OCC Launches Virtual Maps and Tours on College’s Website

OAKLAND COUNTY, Mich. – Jan. 3, 2020 — Finding the right building or the best place to park on a college campus can be challenging, especially for new students and visitors. OCC has made it easier with Virtual Tours and Maps to find classrooms, student centers, bookstores and even a good cup of coffee on any of the College’s five campuses in Oakland County.

Maps are one of the most visited pages on the OCC website. The new Virtual platform provides detailed information with interactive 360-degree tours of each campus and each building with student-narrated video tours of key facilities.

OCC student Katherine Lichtenberg said when she was a new student, she took a cell phone photo of a map hanging on the wall of the Auburn Hills campus to help find her way on campus. “These new interactive maps will be a great help especially for new students trying to find their way around the campus,” she said.

“The Google maps we were using are not kept up to date and can be difficult to use,” said Michele Kersten-Hart, OCC manager of multi-media and web services. “They don’t provide the level of detail needed by students and visitors. Our new online maps continue to provide directions to each of our campuses but now offer so much more information in an easy-to-navigate, visually interactive way.”

OCC worked with CampusTours, a national multimedia provider, to develop this next level of mapping software, which also features online guided tours. When students and visitors click on an OCC building in the virtual 3-D map, they get a description of key areas, a room directory, photos and, in some cases, a 360 degree video of featured areas. The new maps also provide information on specific OCC academic programs located on those campuses and a direct link to the program page on the OCC website for more information.

OCC Auburn Hills’ campus bookstore student-worker, Rachel Foltz, said she uses the new virtual maps to help answer questions from students about where certain buildings are on campus. “It is much easier to show students where things are now with these new maps than it was using the old basic maps,” she said.

While these virtual maps and tours are a navigational benefit for current students, they also assist OCC Admissions coordinators to provide details about each campus and the college’s programs to prospective students. The coordinators can now provide students with detailed visual images of the campus they are likely to attend, based on their academic program interest or geographic proximity from home or work.
Videos with students pointing out the features of each campus and virtual 360 degree photo tours of buildings give students the feeling they are actually on campus. It also helps increase the time that prospective students interact on the website.

“These virtual maps and tours are an excellent way to introduce prospective students, parents and high school counselors to OCC when we are out at college events, recruiting fairs and high schools,” said Keith Pawlovich, interim director of admissions. “The virtual maps and 360 degree virtual tour showcases our campuses in a way words simply can’t.”

To view the Virtual Tours and Maps, visit Maps.

Winter semester classes at OCC begin Jan. 13, 2020. Online registration is currently available online at https://oaklandcc.edu/open-door/registration.aspx. Final registration ends Jan. 12, 2020 and Winter Semester classes begin Monday, Jan. 13, 2020.

About OCC
With five campuses in Oakland County, OCC is Michigan’s number one transfer institution, offering nearly 100 excellent degrees and certificates. The College empowers academic and developmental experiences, allowing students to reach their full potential and enhance the communities they serve. More than a million students have enrolled in the College since it opened in 1965. Learn more at oaklandcc.edu.

Walsh Joins Detroit Promise as First Bridge Partner

Walsh will allow qualified students graduating from community college to transfer and continue their education towards a bachelor’s degree.

TROY, Mich. Jan. 3, 2020 – In an effort to provide more students with the opportunity to advance their learning, Walsh has entered into a partnership with Detroit Promise, administered by the Detroit Regional Chamber, offering transfers and scholarships to Detroit Promise two-year students graduating from a participating community college, beginning in the winter 2020 semester.

“For more than 50 years, Walsh has provided an accessible, seamless pathway for community college students to finish their degree at a nationally ranked, private institution. We are very proud to continue this practice as the first bridge partner for the Detroit Promise,” said Marsha Kelliher, President and CEO of Walsh.

Walsh has committed to being an unlimited partner to Detroit Promise, which means they will provide a tuition-free path to an unlimited number of Detroit Promise students who meet the general requirements.

To qualify for the transfer to Walsh, Detroit Promise community college students must have 60 credits or an associate degree from a participating community college: Henry Ford College, Jackson College, Macomb Community College, Oakland Community College, Schoolcraft College or Wayne County Community College District.

If the student meets these qualifications, they can apply to transfer to Walsh subsequently applying to continue their education and earn a bachelor’s degree.

Since 2013, the Detroit Regional Chamber has administered the Detroit Promise, which is funded by the Michigan Education Excellence Foundation and university partners. Through this funding, the program ensures that any Detroit-resident student graduating in the city of Detroit will have a tuition-free path to an associate, technical certificate, or bachelor’s degree at participating community colleges and four-year universities.

For more information on the Detroit Promise, please visit www.detroitpromise.com.

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ABOUT WALSH
Walsh is an all-business, private, independent, not-for-profit, fully accredited college offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral business and technology degrees, as well as certificate programs. Founded in 1922, Walsh is one of Southeast Michigan’s largest graduate business schools, offering classes in several locations and online. Our nationally-ranked programs integrate theory and application to prepare graduates for successful careers. Walsh degree programs include accounting, finance, information technology, human resources, management, marketing, taxation and other fields. For more information, please visit www.walshcollege.edu.

Walsh is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (www.hlcommission.org) and the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (www.acbsp.org).

ABOUT DETROIT PROMISE
The Detroit Promise scholarship, administered by the Detroit Regional Chamber, ensures that any Detroit-resident student graduating from a high school in the city will have a tuition-free path to an associate degree or technical certificate at participating community colleges, or a four-year degree at participating universities. Since 2013, the Chamber has administered the Detroit Promise (formerly the Detroit Scholarship Fund), which is privately funded by the Michigan Education Excellence Foundation to fulfill Gov. Rick Snyder’s pledge. In 2016, Mayor Mike Duggan announced the Detroit Promise Zone authority to dedicate a portion of tax dollars to permanently fund the two-year scholarships.

OCC on Cutting Edge of National Initiative to Ensure Students Receive the Degrees They Earned

Earning a college degree can be one of the greatest achievements of a person’s life. But colleges nationwide are finding that many students who complete the requirements aren’t taking the steps needed to be awarded the official degree. They are among students known as the “some college, no degree” population, and according to a recent publication by the National Student Clearinghouse, there are more than 1 million of these students in Michigan.

Why students are not receiving the degrees they’ve earned is a trend that OCC is a working to remedy. The college is on the forefront of the Degrees When Due initiative being led by the Institute for Higher Education Policy.

OCC Registrar Stephen Linden was recently quoted in a national news article on the higher education website, EdSurge.com, which highlighted the “4 Reasons Why Students Don’t Receive the Degrees They’ve Earned” and looks at this initiative.

Linden says there are a number of reasons why some students “stop-out” (students who stop attending OCC for a variety of reasons and do not transfer to another institution) and don’t receive their degree:

1. The student’s academic focus is on a different program, and they are not aware of degrees they complete along the way;
2. The student never came in for academic advising and they are unaware of the requirements to be awarded the degree;
3. Their focus is on transferring to a four-year institution, not on completing a degree at OCC;
4. They don’t understand the value of receiving the degree until after they are in the work force.

To help bridge this degree-award gap, Linden said the College has recently identified 900 students who, in a six-year window of time, earned a degree but never had it posted to their records. These students have also never earned a degree anywhere else. These stop-out students were sent a certified letter indicating they have met all graduation requirements for one or more degrees, their earned credentials will be posted to their student records and diplomas will be mailed directly – unless they specifically request otherwise.

In addition to this initiative, OCC is also working to improve automated systems to better flag a student record when the student has qualified for a credential in real-time and ensure students reap the benefits of their efforts sooner, Linden said.

“While helping students complete the degree they are pursuing is the ultimate goal of completion efforts, it is very rewarding to let them know they completed a degree they didn’t expect.”

“It’s the Christmas of higher ed,” said Linden. “We’re able to provide a gift they’ve truly earned already but never received.”

Re-engagement efforts with Degrees When Due will continue in 2020. OCC will be contacting hundreds more “some college, no degree” students who are one or two courses away from degree completion with the hope these students will return to OCC to complete those final courses. Students who have left the area can complete OCC online courses, or even take them at another nearby community college or university and transfer these final credits back to the College.

Linden said there are many completion pathways former students can follow, and OCC is committed to empowering students and guide them to exploring the many options available that work best for them.

If you believe you have earned a degree or would like more information on the Degrees When Done project, please contact OCC’s Registrar Stephen Linden at 248.341.2192.

About OCC
With five campuses in Oakland County, OCC is Michigan’s number one transfer institution, offering nearly 100 excellent degrees and certificates. The College empowers academic and developmental experiences, allowing students to reach their full potential and enhance the communities they serve. More than a million students have enrolled in the College since it opened in 1965. Learn more at oaklandcc.edu.

A New Report About Metro Detroit Is Out. Here Are 3 Takeaways

December 5, 2019

Detroit Free Press

John Gallagher 

The Detroit Regional Chamber released its latest annual State of the Region report Thursday, and I have three takeaways from it.

A rich compendium of facts and figures about the 11-county southeast Michigan region, the full report can be found at the website detroitchamber.com.

Useful as a guide and mirror of where metro Detroit finds itself, the packed report defies easy summary. But back to my top three points:

Economy taking a breather

First, the booming growth enjoyed in southeast Michigan and the state as a whole since the Great Recession has finally cooled a bit. Not dramatically so, nor are we in a new recession. It’s just that the above average growth of recent years cannot be sustained forever.

Sandy Baruah, president and CEO of the Chamber, acknowledged as much as he briefed the media Wednesday on the new report and emphasized the positive.

“Our regional economy continues to grow,” Baruah told reporters. “Jobs continue to grow. Per capita income’s on the rise. Median home values are strong and getting stronger. … Population is up slightly and that is a better direction than in past years. Labor force participation rate, poverty rates, all those have slightly improved in the new data.”

But he continued, “Over the last two years now we have seen some leveling off and in this year in particular we have noticed decreases for some key metrics, including exports, housing permits, foreign direct investment. And our unemployment has actually ticked up just slightly.”

Other data sources have made the same point. Economists generally agree Michigan’s economy will continue to expand for at least another couple of years. But there’s enough hints in the data of a little softening to start putting away a little extra for a rainy day.

Education woes remain a ‘flashing red light’

Second, the State of the Region makes clear that our biggest challenge, or what Baruah calls our “flashing red light,” is the failure of our education system.

Data in the report show that over the past five years, graduation rates in the region have been trending upward, slightly lagging behind the national average. But for city of Detroit students, graduation rates within four years have fallen 1% since 2014.

Then, too, fewer than 10% of city of Detroit high school students are considered college-ready, based on SAT scores above 1,060 or ACT of 21 or higher.

And southeast Michigan high school grads who reach for some post-high school education or train too often drop out. The Chamber report shows that 47% of regional high school grads and 73% of city of Detroit grads have not earned a degree or certificate within six years of enrollment.

And while there are some improvements in a few areas, Baruah added, “It is a very mixed picture. We lag our peers. We lag the nation.”

Given the stakes involved, for our young people and for a region that desperately needs a trained and educated workforce, we have got to put more thought and resources into training our kids for the future.

The region really needs to act like a region

And, third, the Chamber’s report makes me wonder whether this region acts often enough as, well, a region. That is, the disparate communities in the Chamber’s 11-county report too often remain riven by city-suburban rivalries or conflicts between the rural exurbs and the more densely populated communities closer to the center.

True, as Baruah told me, we’ve gotten better at cooperating. That’s especially true now that Democrat Dave Coulter has succeeded the late L. Brooks Patterson as Oakland County executive, smoothing the way for a more cooperative relationship with Democrats Warren Evans in Wayne County and Mike Duggan in Detroit.

“I have never seen the kind the high-level collaboration between the mayor and the three key county executives than I have just in these recent months,” Baruah said in response to my question. “I think that’s a hugely positive sign that we have leaders that are not just willing but are already showing demonstrable evidence that they’re working together.”

That will especially be true as these leaders shape a new referendum on regional transit for the 2020 ballot. They’ll need help from Gov. Gretchen Whitmer to get there.

“I think the big thing we’re going to be asking the state for now is support from the governor’s office for updated RTA (regional transit) legislation that will allow our regional leaders to put together a more flexible plan, and we’ve got that support from the governor’s office,” Baruah said.

My conclusion: I hope Sandy Baruah’s right about things looking better on regional transit and a host of other issues. For unless we start thinking of metro Detroit as our unified home, and less like a cluster of fractious competing communities, we’ll never achieve our full potential.

Read the article here

Detroit Regional Chamber Receives $765K Grant to Expand Strategy to Fill Talent Gap From Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation

DETROIT, Oct. 17, 2019 – The Detroit Regional Chamber announced an expanded strategy to help fill the talent pipeline for employers and a grant of $765,000 from the Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation to fund this work for the next 24 months. The Chamber’s effort is targeting the region’s population who have some college experience but haven’t earned a postsecondary degree or credential. The work removes barriers for these individuals to pursue their degree or credential and offers a pathway to a sustainable career.

With a portion of the funding, the Chamber is in the process of hiring two positions – one will focus on program and employers’ partnerships and the other will focus directly on adult college completion efforts.

The expanded strategy will contribute to increasing postsecondary degree attainment in Michigan to 60% by 2030, a goal established by the Chamber in 2016 and was adopted by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer earlier this year. There are nearly 700,000 people in the Detroit region that qualify as “adult learners” – the population aged 25 years or older with varying levels of prior college experience. In addition to growing the number of qualified workers for employers, the Chamber’s work will also help increase the per capita income for these individuals and contribute to cutting the region’s equity gap in half.

“Over the past year, the Chamber’s strategies to fill the talent gap have gained national attention. The grant from the Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation will build upon that work by targeting Detroiters who are unemployed or underemployed and connect them with a pathway to earn a sustainable living wage by aligning their skills with the needs of regional businesses,” said Sandy Baruah, president and CEO of the Chamber.

The Chamber is now poised to:

  1. Help employers establish an environment to upskill existing employees
  2. Work with regional community colleges to align programs with business needs and become more adult-friendly
  3. Reach adults from the past 15 years who “stopped out” before earning a degree and help them restart their education
  4. Help adult learners navigate their return to education by connecting them with support services to ensure their success

“With this funding, the Chamber seeks to activate employers and supports community colleges to assist adults in obtaining additional postsecondary training and new skills that prepare them for the in-demand jobs of today and tomorrow in Southeast Michigan.  These goals are closely aligned with the Foundation’s priorities in the Young Adults and Working Families focus area, and we are proud to support the Chamber in leading this collaborative regional effort,” said Lavea Brachman, vice president of programs for Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation.

The Chamber is targeting adults and engaging businesses in the following counties – Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, Washtenaw, and Wayne. To execute the full strategy, the Chamber estimates this work will require an additional $1.5 million in funding.

The body of work funded by the Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation is the result of the Chamber’s Detroit Drives Degrees regional collective impact effort which engages stakeholders from business, government, and education who share the goal to increase regional degree attainment. The work concepts were developed by reviewing national best practices and with critical input from this group. The Detroit Drives Degrees partners will continue to engage in the execution of the work and contribute to its success.

To learn more visit www.detroitchamber.com/D3 or contact Melanie D’Evelyn at mdevelyn@detroitchamber.com.

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About Detroit Regional Chamber

Serving the business community for more than 100 years, the Detroit Regional Chamber is one of the oldest, largest and most respected chambers of commerce in the country. As the voice for business in the 11-county Southeast Michigan region, the Chamber’s mission is carried out through creating a business-friendly climate and value for members, leading a robust economic development strategy, and convening Michigan’s most influential audience at the nationally unique Mackinac Policy Conference.

About Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation

The Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation is a grantmaking organization dedicated primarily to sustained investment in the quality of life of the people of Southeast Michigan and Western New York. The two areas reflect Ralph C. Wilson, Jr.’s devotion to his hometown of Detroit and greater Buffalo, home of his Buffalo Bills franchise. Prior to his passing in 2014, Mr. Wilson requested that a significant share of his estate be used to continue a life-long generosity of spirit by funding the Foundation that bears his name. The Foundation has a grantmaking capacity of $1.2 billion over a 20-year period, which expires January 8, 2035. This structure is consistent with Mr. Wilson’s desire for the Foundation’s impact to be immediate, substantial, measurable and overseen by those who knew him best. For more information visit www.rcwjrf.org.

Walsh Student Loan Default Rate Drops for Second Consecutive 3-Year Term

TROY, Mich., Oct. 1, 2019 — The U.S. Department of Education released its three-year student loan default rate and Walsh’s rate has dropped more than a full percentage point to 2.3%, compared to 11.5% across Michigan and 10.1% nationally. Walsh’s student loan default rate has consistently fallen below both the Michigan and national averages for many years.

“Our students tend to be very fiscally conscious and only borrow what they need to cover tuition and fees,” said Catherine Berrahou, director of financial aid. “In some cases, that amount may be less than the original amount in their financial aid offer, but they don’t want to borrow more than they need to.”

Walsh is an upper-division institution offering internationally and nationally ranked business and technology programs. Bachelor’s and master’s degrees, a doctoral program and graduate-level business certificates are available. Walsh has partnered with community colleges for more than 50 years to offer students a cost-effective pathway to a bachelor’s degree. Students starting at community college and transferring to Walsh to finish their bachelor’s degree can save between $35,000-60,000 on tuition, compared to four-year public and private institutions.

For more information about Walsh, visit www.walshcollege.edu/future-students.

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ABOUT WALSH
Walsh is an all-business, private, independent, not-for-profit, fully accredited college offering undergraduate and graduate business and technology degrees, as well as certificate programs. Founded in 1922, Walsh is one of Southeast Michigan’s largest graduate business schools, offering classes in several locations and online. Our nationally-ranked programs integrate theory and application to prepare graduates for successful careers. Walsh degree programs include accounting, finance, information technology, human resources, management, marketing, taxation and other fields. For more information, please visit www.walshcollege.edu.

Walsh is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (www.hlcommission.org) and the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (www.acbsp.org).